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Author Topic: fun observations about the magnetic field  (Read 13572 times)

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2015, 01:52:38 AM »
This is a pretty cool video of a large Steel Bearing rotor:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gpaPKlyWKM&list=PLDvggocZX1ekD8BaeYnuQ-xU2qJJuEKVV

I wonder if "Magnet Spheres" might roll if attached to a "Steel Center ball" by tiny disk magnet axles? It might help if the magnet spheres were seperated by paddle Wheel blades. It would shift from a monopole rotor to a N-S rotor very easily.

I don't get it.  Without Mr. Hand, it will just sit there.  When he adds all of those other balls and the mass is increased, he has to take more effort (and time) in spinning it up.  Am I missing something here?

Bill

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2015, 01:52:38 AM »

Offline synchro1

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2015, 04:19:52 AM »
I don't get it.  Without Mr. Hand, it will just sit there.  When he adds all of those other balls and the mass is increased, he has to take more effort (and time) in spinning it up.  Am I missing something here?

Bill

That's nearly 5 pounds of steel spinning around with no axle or bearing. The 2" neo sphere exerts over 100 pounds of pull force. It would take a 3-D printed housing to keep magnets that size seperated. I Imagine an E-Z spin motor like Lasersaber's, with all the coils in series and one Reed Switch would keep the balls Rolling. The coils might need to be soup can size. The "Flux Density" would be enormous!

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2015, 06:49:35 AM »
What 2 inch neo sphere are you talking about?

Quote
We use a lot of large and heavy 37mm balls (from a radial bearing)  and used some strong magnets as spokes and bearing points

No "neo sphere" is mentioned. And 37 mm is only 1.45669 inches.


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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2015, 06:49:35 AM »
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Offline synchro1

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2015, 07:20:03 AM »
What 2 inch neo sphere are you talking about?

No "neo sphere" is mentioned. And 37 mm is only 1.45669 inches.

@TinselKoala,

Substituting neo sphere magnets for the steel balls is my idea. The center ball would remain Steel. The stacked magnet axles would serve to keep one pole facing out, and pivot on the center ball. The magnets and steel ball can be any dimension, as long as they match. 2" is the largest size neo sphere's come in currently. Way over budget for you.

Offline synchro1

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2015, 07:55:03 PM »
Plastic "Bubble Blowers" with  handles and circular loops, could be glued to the center Steel ball by the handle ends and placed over the Spheres, to keep the "Neo Magnet Spheres" apart and secure against parting from the Steel ball. Maybe the spinning balls will reduce "Lenz Drag"             

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2015, 07:55:03 PM »
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Offline barbosi

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2015, 04:40:01 AM »
I'm afraid there is nothing special about these videos. The experiment with the CRT screen and its behaviour in the precence of a magnet is predictable. The electron ray fails to hit the right color, and instead are deflected by the magnetism. Also this electron ray is moving horizontally very fast and its magnetic field will respond to the field from the magnet and cause the screen to swirl.

Is not about the colour, but the "swirl" as you say (the shape). The very first video proves at min 3:20 the spiral motion of magnetic lines, thing which is not presented in any school books.
Sure one could bring into discussion any of the theories behind cathodic tube, but that won't explain WHY that shape occurs. I take the "electrons" as a finer grade of iron filings and if not convinced, here you have another experiment proving the same:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fe-tRsRjxz0

If you could accept that, then you could accept some other major aspects of that video.

Regards.

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2015, 09:47:15 PM »
Is not about the colour, but the "swirl" as you say (the shape). The very first video proves at min 3:20 the spiral motion of magnetic lines, thing which is not presented in any school books.
Sure one could bring into discussion any of the theories behind cathodic tube, but that won't explain WHY that shape occurs. I take the "electrons" as a finer grade of iron filings and if not convinced, here you have another experiment proving the same:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fe-tRsRjxz0

If you could accept that, then you could accept some other major aspects of that video.

Regards.
The electrons are moving charged particles, which will travel in curved paths when passing through a magnetic field oriented in certain ways. This is fundamental, it is entirely calculatable, it is contained in Maxwell's equations, and it is how the CRT designers make the electron beams hit the right places in the face of the CRT when it is displaying an image. Have you ever taken apart a CRT monitor/TV set? Do you see the yoke coils and the fine tuning magnets around the neck of the CRT tube? All this stuff about how electron beams behave in the presence of magnetic fields is QUITE WELL UNDERSTOOD or engineers wouldn't be able to design the CRT in the first place! The reason the "spiral motion of magnetic lines" isn't presented in "any school books" is because it doesn't occur in reality. Your mental model of electrons as "finer grades of iron filings" is also wrong. Electrons are _electrically charged_ particles and iron filings aren't. Moving electrically charged particles produce a magnetic field, and the direction of motion of electrically charged particles is affected by external magnetic fields. These are facts that are proven by literally hundreds of engineered devices that you encounter every day, including the computer that you are using to read this comment.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2015, 09:47:15 PM »
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Offline barbosi

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2015, 03:34:27 AM »

C'mon tk, why did you have to bite?

This is fundamental, it is entirely calculatable, it is contained in Maxwell's equations

Maxwell equations are great but do not reflect conservation of energy. Look at the graph http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_equations#/media/File:Electromagneticwave3D.gif and tell me why B and E fields are max or zero at the same time and how that applies to (or respect) the conservation of energy. At ZERO there is no energy AT ALL. How both fields reborn? Phoenix (the mythical bird) effect LOL?

..., and it is how the CRT designers make the electron beams hit the right places in the face of the CRT when it is displaying an image. Have you ever taken apart a CRT monitor/TV set?

I'll save this for later to give you time to study the "S curve" of electrons' beam and we can debate it when you truly understand it.

An additional question is about the water in the video i suggested. Any idea why vapors have the swirling shape?

You sound and your confidence surely look like a well grounded into proven facts type of professor, but I'm willing to challenge you only after you answer my two questions: Maxwell and my proposed video.

Or just accept your boss' slap and fade away (it's just a pay check and your value can draw income from somewhere else).


Toodly-oo....

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2015, 09:32:44 AM »
C'mon tk, why did you have to bite?

Maxwell equations are great but do not reflect conservation of energy. Look at the graph http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_equations#/media/File:Electromagneticwave3D.gif and tell me why B and E fields are max or zero at the same time and how that applies to (or respect) the conservation of energy. At ZERO there is no energy AT ALL. How both fields reborn? Phoenix (the mythical bird) effect LOL?

I'll save this for later to give you time to study the "S curve" of electrons' beam and we can debate it when you truly understand it.

An additional question is about the water in the video i suggested. Any idea why vapors have the swirling shape?

You sound and your confidence surely look like a well grounded into proven facts type of professor, but I'm willing to challenge you only after you answer my two questions: Maxwell and my proposed video.

Or just accept your boss' slap and fade away (it's just a pay check and your value can draw income from somewhere else).


Toodly-oo....
Your "Conservation of Energy" strawman about propagation of EM waves in space has very little to do with your original bogus misrepresentation of what goes on when a magnet is placed near a CRT, since electrons are not photons and photons are not charged particles. Have you ever heard of the quantities μ0 and ε0 ?

I doubt if you have the necessary  math to understand it, but here is just one of many references you can try to absorb, concerning Maxwell's Equations, propagation of EM waves, and conservation of energy:
http://physics.gmu.edu/~joe/PHYS685/Topic6.pdf

Yes, I certainly do know why the circulation occurs in the magnet-demonstration. But you evidently do not.

The people who design CRTs and electron microscopes and many other devices certainly do understand the "S-curve"  of electrons in magnetic fields as you put it, since they make them reach their desired targets very accurately and so consistently that the devices that perform this magic can be mass-produced by the millions... and these engineers would be laughing in their beers at reading your comments. The very chips that make your computer work are manufactured by producing, carefully manipulating and accurately directing beams of charged particles using time-varying magnetic fields according to the relationships condensed into Maxwell's Equations and the Lorentz Force Law. So if you want to "debate" these facts I suggest you do it with a chip fabrication engineer. Why don't you stake your next paycheck on the outcome of your "debate"? It's just a paycheck...




Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2015, 09:32:44 AM »
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Offline barbosi

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2015, 03:55:08 PM »
tk,
I thought you brought Maxwell into discussion. now I have to go back and check.

However the law about conservation of energy still applies and your share with the pdf document is much appreciated.
I particularly enjoyed the conclusions on “Liénard­Wiechert potentials” which lead to Conservation of Energy and Momentum        (Jackson sec 6.7)

In essence it means that having parkinson disease can have some advantages, namely one can scrub easier the ceramic tiles, especially when is p!ss all over the floor.

your truly,
max well

Offline shylo

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2015, 02:14:35 AM »
Magnetic strength is only as good as gravity will let it travel.
The balance between the two , is very hard to find.
If you could loop a mag track is , that perpetual motion?
artv

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2015, 02:14:35 AM »
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Offline superhero

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2015, 04:03:53 PM »
I have an explanation to the vertical lens in # 2.  Each and every object on the surface of our planet essentially becomes a magnet with a north and south polarity.  when the lens is held vertically perpendicular to Planet Earth surface it assumes the same magnetic Polarity of north and south.  therefore, as the magnet rotates in the upper side of the lens, a clockwise Spin is noted & counterclockwise spIn  in the south side of the lens. 

I forgot to add this video its very informative and wonderful
https://youtu.be/tbnoby4xKP8
concentrate on minute 4


Offline superhero

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #27 on: December 16, 2015, 06:50:17 AM »
https://youtu.be/AMCIeaPISlo
   Guys check this

Offline superhero

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Re: fun observations about the magnetic field
« Reply #28 on: December 22, 2015, 02:48:28 AM »
https://youtu.be/AMCIeaPISlo
   Guys check this
  To all the geek community please someone explain this to me.  2 magnets in repulsion with different sizes.  There is an attraction when smaller cylindrical magnet is right in the center of the larger disk magnet.!!!!!!!!!!!!!   Watch what happens when i moved the smaller magnet out of the center
https://youtu.be/u7_FKwvr3Xg

 

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