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Author Topic: Food for Thought: Our World  (Read 213860 times)

Offline orbut 3000

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #105 on: January 01, 2015, 06:10:37 AM »
It's funny how the most idealistic, caring and opinionated can be persuaded to throw away their vote and be excluded from the governing process. And then, those people are the loudest whining about how disenfranchised and suppressed they are. LOL.


At least they are informed of the latest Alex Jones pen/s enlargament pill sales and other prepper supplies once the shiite hated the fan really bad, or somthang.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #105 on: January 01, 2015, 06:10:37 AM »

Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #106 on: January 01, 2015, 06:27:23 AM »
Quote from: Pirate88179
Do some research.  It died a long time before this.  Check out what FDR did.....that is when all of this started.

Of course you are correct in that the process
was well underway long before this year.

While FDR accomplished much to implement
Corporation U.S. by means of his New Deal and
the Social Security Act of 1935;  his cousin Teddy
got the ball rolling in a large way much earlier.

The 'old system of law' in the U.S. died in 1939
when it was supplanted by the 'new system' of
statutes in the U.S. Code.  By that time FDR had
gotten the old loyal Supremes removed and replaced
by New Supremes who were beholden to the Corporation
and all that it would provide for them.

The True History of the U.S. is very dirty business.
1912 and 1913 were landmark years for the progress
of the AGENDA as they marked the time of the complete
takeover of the political process by the Banksters who
concocted the Federal Reserve.

Aye, the 'Totalitarian Tip-Toe' or gradual Trance-Formation
of the U.S. has been creeping along for a bunch of decades.
So slowly that the People could barely notice...

This year the pace has quickened as the ELITES fear that
they haven't much time before the People awaken.  They
know that they are vastly outnumbered.


Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #107 on: January 01, 2015, 06:32:11 AM »
Quote from: orbut 3000
It's funny how the most idealistic, caring and opinionated can be persuaded to throw away their vote and be excluded from the governing process. And then, those people are the loudest whining about how disenfranchised and suppressed they are. LOL.
...

Mark this spot and hold that thought in the back of
your consciousness as you live more of life.

In ten or so years, after you've acquired some understanding
of the 'governing process' and how it really operates to the
detriment of the People; opine upon this once again then.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #107 on: January 01, 2015, 06:32:11 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline orbut 3000

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #108 on: January 01, 2015, 06:54:28 AM »
Mark this spot and hold that thought in the back of
your consciousness as you live more of life.

In ten or so years, after you've acquired some understanding
of the 'governing process' and how it really operates to the
detriment of the People; opine upon this once again then.
You seem to be very fond of your own opinion but you still have no clue how the world works, son. <--haha


Silly insulting rhetorical routines can't refute sane arguments and facts. Neither can borderline retardist, pointless meme pictures depicting irrational fears held dear by paranoid alphabeticists.

Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #109 on: January 01, 2015, 07:47:51 AM »
Somehow I doubt that your considered opinion will
change over the span of 10 years, but we can none-
the-less hope that wisdom enters in.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #109 on: January 01, 2015, 07:47:51 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline orbut 3000

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #110 on: January 01, 2015, 07:55:22 AM »
As I have thought. No cogent argument, but more prefabbed propaganda posters.

Offline orbut 3000

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #111 on: January 01, 2015, 08:37:06 AM »
You can swallow those Alex Jones inforwars dot com vitamin b12 special TRUTH preparations all you want but it won't help you understand reality at all.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #111 on: January 01, 2015, 08:37:06 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline orbut 3000

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #112 on: January 01, 2015, 08:56:02 AM »
I'm actually happy that the sheeple-meme posting minority keeps themselves away from power and participation. Their material is more fitting to comedy than policy.

Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #113 on: January 01, 2015, 08:45:27 PM »
Is the Real Constitutional Crisis Repairable?

Quote from: Article
There Is a Constitutional Crisis, but Not the One Many People Think ... It's the Bush-Obama record of surveillance and lack of accountability—and not executive action on immigration—that ought to concern citizens. – The Atlantic

Dominant Social Theme:
Lawlessness is the problem, not specific laws or regulations.
Free-Market Analysis: The idea of this Atlantic article is that US governance generally is abdicating its responsibility to counteract lawlessness and this is fundamentally unbalancing US democracy.

This is a perceptive point, though to ignore the legal and regulatory barrage generated by Congress in the past decades doesn't make too much sense.
The larger imbalance faced by US citizens – and citizens of the West generally – is that governments generally have too much power and authority. Too much money flows into government and too much government activism is the result.
Here's more:

Are we at a crisis that threatens the entire system? Do the American people face a lawless, overreaching executive rampaging through immigration and environmental policy?

The ... blame should fall squarely on the GOP caucus. Since 2009, Republicans have tried to pretend that the president is, somehow, not really in office, because, well, they shouldn't ever lose an election. This mummery is not just offensive; it represents unilateral disarmament in the unequal struggle between White House and Capitol Hill.

Like most opposition parties, the Republicans don't have veto-proof majorities. The only way Congress can block a president from taking actions it dislikes is to enact laws—laws and appropriations bills that a president will sign. To do that, the opposition must be willing to sit down and negotiate with the president, giving him part of what he wants in exchange for part of what Congress wants.
That kind of negotiation can't happen if one side wants to pretend the other is illegitimate. Because their base demands this solemn charade, the Republicans have been reduced to silliness that makes them look weaker—multiple useless votes to repeal the Affordable Care Act, shutdown and threat of default, and, silliest of all, the Big Bad Lawsuit, which is the rough equivalent of running away and yelling, "I'm telling Mom!"

As Jack Goldsmith noted last June, "It takes a lot of work for Congress to exercise its constitutional responsibilities of investigation and oversight and pushback. So much easier to call in the lawyers and authorize them to bring a high-profile lawsuit, especially with mid-terms around the corner! And so one can only sigh when House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, who should be leading the charge against the President in his committee, instead defends the lawsuit on the grounds of 'people standing up for the balance of power.'"

The true danger to the republic right now is an executive establishment that, under the past two presidents, has taken on itself the role of deciding where and whether to make war, has made a mockery of constitutional and statutory restraints on surveillance, and has first conducted and then persistently concealed a shocking campaign of torture. The problem is not that Obama is better or George W. Bush was worse—what is striking instead is the continuity between administrations on these matters.

This last paragraph certainly provides us with certain credible points. Much of what seems to be illegal or unlawful these days is never challenged by those with the authority to do so.

Most of the complaining about constitutional problems is therefore just that – complaining. The more difficult and dangerous work of moving beyond rhetoric and into action is less apparent.

This article attributes the lack of confrontation to laziness and opportunism. Fixing problems is a lot harder than talking about them or more cynically running against them. But we'll present another theory that has nothing to do with laziness or cynical political calculation. In our view, a lot of the cravenness of current political actors has to do with fear.

Most everyone – and certainly politicians – have something to hide and something to fear and surely there is a general perception on Capitol Hill that individual policy makers are a target of ongoing surveillance.

Most lawmakers are not heroes or even necessarily men of principle. They get into the field for self advancement. The idea that these people would stick up for certain principles contradicts observable reality.

And it's not in the nature of many lawmakers. These are practical men who have spent a good deal of time and money achieving their positions. They are inclined to work with the system as it is rather than trying to upend it.

The real problem, as we pointed out above, is that government is too big and has too many revenue streams to draw on including most importantly central bank money printing.

This Atlantic article wants legislators and presidents alike to do the hard work of negotiating lawful legislation. But, really, in the US in particular, who is to determine what is "lawful" at this point?

The entire constitutional process has moved far beyond the limited-government perception of US founding fathers. The only way to control lawless governance at this point is to reduce the size of government radically. That is probably not going to happen.

Alternatively, as we have argued, it is up to you to protect yourself and your family and even your community from government incursions. Take whatever steps you can to protect yourself from the system as it is by securing secondary passports, alternative lifestyle communities abroad and gold and silver stocks at home and abroad. We present potential solutions for your consideration in our Special Reports section, including, for instance: "A Second Home ... In A Second Country" Terra Viva http://www.thedailybell.com/haim-investment-opportunities/your-second-home-in-a-second-country-video/ and "Don't Lose Your Gold." http://www.thedailybell.com/haim-investment-opportunities/dont-lose-your-gold-video/

 Conclusion: The idea is to "live free in an unfree world," as Harry Browne suggested. Create your freedom; don't wait for government to do it for you. And, especially, don't wait for Western regulatory democracies to "reform."

- See more at: http://www.thedailybell.com/news-analysis/35962/Is-the-Real-Constitutional-Crisis-Repairable/?uuid=6F808B25-5056-9627-3C1C0B7DA4C0C1D3#sthash.SF5PLh4a.dpuf
 

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #113 on: January 01, 2015, 08:45:27 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #114 on: January 01, 2015, 11:36:04 PM »
Is the Real Constitutional Crisis Repairable?


Quoted from the article you posted: "Free-Market Analysis: The idea of this Atlantic article is that US governance generally is abdicating its responsibility to counteract lawlessness and this is fundamentally unbalancing US democracy." (Emphasis mine)

This fellow that wrote this must be an uninformed idiot.  He should learn a little more about our form of government here in the US.

The U.S. is not now, nor has it ever been, a democracy.  It is a Representative Republic.  This was done by the founding fathers for many reasons.

Many members of the media also get this wrong on a regular basis.  These two forms of government are totally different.  Totally.
Anyone can read in any decent history book about our country's founding and see the difference and why it was decided to go for the republic over a democracy.

How come this guy writing the article did not know even this most basic of facts?  This totally discredits him/her in my mind and I did not bother to read further.


Posting things like this with such a glaring error does not help to make whatever point it is you are trying to make.

Bill

Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #115 on: January 02, 2015, 02:06:10 AM »
While it is true that the Constitution did establish
a Republic with Representatives of the People, that
once thriving Republic has been de-activated by those
in power and replaced with a Corporation.

The District (U.S. Government) has always been a Democracy
as it conducts its business within The District.

The States were formerly Sovereign States of the Republic.
Those States, since the '70s, have each and every one been
re-organized into sub-corporations of Corporation U.S. as
'corporate STATE OF CAPITALIZED STATE NAME.'

The Corporate STATES are all operating under Revised Statute
in accordance with their Corporate re-organization.

Again, the Totalitarian Tip-Toe, done so gradually and without
'full disclosure' in order to prevent the People from taking
notice.

Your Representative and your Senator will admit all of this
to you if you ask the proper questions.


The Constitution and The Republic are, for all practical
purposes, shredded and dead.

The People have been screwed.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #115 on: January 02, 2015, 02:06:10 AM »
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Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #116 on: January 02, 2015, 03:13:57 AM »
2015:  Year of the Militaristic NeoCons

As Sanford used to say in 'Sanford and Son'
"This could be the big one..."

Quote from: Article at Link
These days, militaristic Neoconservatives, or Neocons,have near complete control of the American government under the façade of whoever is president at the time. They direct U.S. policies at the State Department, at the Pentagon, at the U.S. Treasury and at the Fed central bank. They are thus in position to influence and frame American foreign policy, military policy, economic and financial policies and monetary policy.

See more here.


And, 2014:  Two Events that Shook the World



Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #117 on: January 02, 2015, 05:19:51 AM »
A sober report of the year 2014.  The West has
revealed for all to see what sort of Beast it is.

Italian Reporter with heart rending report of
conditions in Lugansk.


It is possible that before long the entire World
and its peoples will experience such conditions.

Offline Qwert

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #118 on: January 02, 2015, 06:07:42 AM »
SM,
how do you know for sure if those journalists are not paid by Moscow?

Offline SeaMonkey

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Re: Food for Thought: Our World
« Reply #119 on: January 02, 2015, 06:33:11 AM »
An Short Video demonstrating how the U.S.
Propaganda Machine (LameStream Media)
'reads' its daily spiel.

One can only hope that media reporting in
other areas of the World are somewhat
better managed.  Sheesh!

 

OneLink