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Solid States Devices => solid state devices => Topic started by: taleo on September 20, 2014, 07:51:46 PM

Title: Regular Transformer connected to the Bi-toroid Transformer (possible issue)
Post by: taleo on September 20, 2014, 07:51:46 PM
Hey guys,

I've replicated the BiTT with successful results, however I found one issue which I could not explain. I have a Kill-Watt-Meter which is just a device that measure the power being consumed off the grid from an appliance that you plug into the wall outlet.

So I hooked up a Kill-Watt-Meter to the wall outlet and connected a regular step-down transformer. Then I connected the output of the regular step-down transformer to input of the BiTT. When I add load to the BiTT I measure overunity from the input of the BiTT to the output for the BiTT. However, when I see the Kill-Watt-Readings from the input of the regular step-down transformer, I see more power being consumed than the output of the BiTT.

I can't come up with an explanation as to why. I am wondering if somehow the apparent power of the input of the BiTT is being somewhat transferred to the input of the step-transformer causing increased power consumption. I don't know if that even makes sense but I just can't figure out why on one side my measurements say one thing but on another side they say something else.

Has anyone had this problem before?
Thanks.
Title: Re: Regular Transformer connected to the Bi-toroid Transformer (possible issue)
Post by: MarkE on September 21, 2014, 12:56:32 AM
Reactance.
Title: Re: Regular Transformer connected to the Bi-toroid Transformer (possible issue)
Post by: taleo on September 21, 2014, 04:14:16 AM
An elaboration would have been appreciated. But it's okay, I figured it out. There's a 90 degree phase shift from the input of the step-down transformer to its output, which is the input of the biTT. The input of the biTT is seen as an inductive load to the step-down transformer so it doesn't matter what the power factor is on that side because its seeing the Apparent power as the True power.

That sucks though, there's gotta be a way around it. I'm gonna look into it some more.
Title: Re: Regular Transformer connected to the Bi-toroid Transformer (possible issue)
Post by: Neo-X on September 21, 2014, 05:08:47 PM
Good job taleo. Can you post screenshots of your bitt? What kind of core did you use?
Title: Re: Regular Transformer connected to the Bi-toroid Transformer (possible issue)
Post by: taleo on September 22, 2014, 06:16:58 AM
Thanks Neo-X. I've attached a photo of it. The top core is silicon steel. The bottom one is metglass with double the cross sectional area. But in reality I think it should be based one surface area not cross-sectional area because ac magnetic field travel on the surface of the core, that's how the wires get induced with the voltage. And I think the name for these cores should be called field divergence cores. It sounds more appropriate but I don't really care I'm just thinking out loud.
Title: Re: Regular Transformer connected to the Bi-toroid Transformer (possible issue)
Post by: Neo-X on September 23, 2014, 09:53:31 AM
@taleo

Your core is good. I cant see any problem here except the airg gap in the center leg. Maybe this airgap affect the secondary flux from bypassing the primary coil.
Title: Re: Regular Transformer connected to the Bi-toroid Transformer (possible issue)
Post by: taleo on September 23, 2014, 06:04:03 PM
Thanks. This one has some gaps on the cuts too which is probably causing loss. The secondary flux is ideally meant to travel through the core beneath the top one. Only the top one has a center leg. I haven't got as good results as other people but on average at 60hz connected to another transformer connected to the wall outlet, I'll get about 130% to 150%. The best I've managed to get using 100hz and 200 hz with an amplifier was 240%.

So if anything I'd say it's good enough to prove the concept. I'll try a better design on the next one. First though, I'm looking into ways to avoid the problem of power consumption when connecting it to the wall outlet. Even if I design one to connect directly to it, the power consumption would be experienced at the next transformer in connection to the grid. Like maybe the one up at the power lines or those big metal green boxes you see outside.

I was thinking maybe rectifying the power and using an inverter made of the BiTT. I don't know if this will work I still have to do the math to see if it makes sense.