Language: 
To browser these website, it's necessary to store cookies on your computer.
The cookies contain no personal information, they are required for program control.
  the storage of cookies while browsing this website, on Login and Register.

GDPR and DSGVO law

Storing Cookies (See : http://ec.europa.eu/ipg/basics/legal/cookies/index_en.htm ) help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
https://overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please LEAVE this website now. From the 25th of May 2018, every existing user has to accept the GDPR agreement at first login. If a user is unwilling to accept the GDPR, he should email us and request to erase his account. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

User Menu

Donations

Please Donate for the Forum.
Many thanks.
Regards, Stefan.(Admin)

A-Ads

Powerbox

Smartbox

3D Solar

3D Solar Panels

DC2DC converter

Micro JouleThief

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

CCTool

CCTool

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Products

WaterMotor kit

Statistics

  • *Total Members: 83730
  • *Latest: allez9

  • *Total Posts: 517558
  • *Total Topics: 15429
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 8
  • *Guests: 23
  • *Total: 31

Author Topic: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.  (Read 99161 times)

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #240 on: September 20, 2015, 09:38:19 PM »
This video shows what happens when magnetic a clutch slips:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHU3oWvG9dk

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #240 on: September 20, 2015, 09:38:19 PM »

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #241 on: September 20, 2015, 10:11:28 PM »
This video is randomly associated with the topic:

WORLD'S SIMPLEST MOTOR amazing new version of homopolar motor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPzJr1jjHnQ

Triple AAA batteries can slide in the core of a diametric tube, the end discs would be set up for a Mendicino Levitator, all that would be left would be to short the discs with a copper wire and, Voila!

Offline antijon

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 211
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #242 on: September 20, 2015, 11:41:39 PM »
Hey synchro1. This is a very interesting topic, regarding the magnetic cogs. I watched the video by mindfreer, and honestly, my only question is why he didn't remove the battery or replace it with a capacitor. An alternator produces 12-14 volts, and obviously a drained battery acts more like a load than a ballast (which it appears he is using it as a type of energy reserve, so to speak). So if I had to guess, I'd say it was not overunity.

If the alternator were driven by a belt, it would be turning at the same rpm as the motor, and the motor would show the load. However, with magnetic cogging, the alternator can slip and run at a lower rpm, just enough to provide 98 watts of power to aid the battery in producing 159 watts to power the bulbs.

The problem with his setup is that we have to assume and draw conclusions, like we assume the battery is mostly dead and the alternator is charging it while powering the inverter. But for that to happen we would need to know that the alternator is at full rpm, which he doesn't show, but we can safely assume it is not because the motor would show 159 watts of power.

In Lidmotor's video, the current increases because he moves the coil away from the magnet. In every motor, or AC motor, the rotor generates a back EMF which opposes the input current. It's not that the load dropped the input current, but that the rotor generated back EMF when it was in the proper position.

And I guess it may have been rhetorical, but a DC motor produces more power when you add magnets because you increase the magnetic lines. However, this is nothing special because if the manufacturers wanted the motor to be more powerful they would have made it twice as big and twice as heavy for you.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #242 on: September 20, 2015, 11:41:39 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #243 on: September 21, 2015, 01:58:51 PM »
Hey synchro1. This is a very interesting topic, regarding the magnetic cogs. I watched the video by mindfreer, and honestly, my only question is why he didn't remove the battery or replace it with a capacitor. An alternator produces 12-14 volts, and obviously a drained battery acts more like a load than a ballast (which it appears he is using it as a type of energy reserve, so to speak). So if I had to guess, I'd say it was not overunity.

If the alternator were driven by a belt, it would be turning at the same rpm as the motor, and the motor would show the load. However, with magnetic cogging, the alternator can slip and run at a lower rpm, just enough to provide 98 watts of power to aid the battery in producing 159 watts to power the bulbs.

The problem with his setup is that we have to assume and draw conclusions, like we assume the battery is mostly dead and the alternator is charging it while powering the inverter. But for that to happen we would need to know that the alternator is at full rpm, which he doesn't show, but we can safely assume it is not because the motor would show 159 watts of power.

In Lidmotor's video, the current increases because he moves the coil away from the magnet. In every motor, or AC motor, the rotor generates a back EMF which opposes the input current. It's not that the load dropped the input current, but that the rotor generated back EMF when it was in the proper position.

And I guess it may have been rhetorical, but a DC motor produces more power when you add magnets because you increase the magnetic lines. However, this is nothing special because if the manufacturers wanted the motor to be more powerful they would have made it twice as big and twice as heavy for you.

@antijon,

Thanks for your participation. A motor twice the size and powerful would consume more input, where-as increasing the motor weight in magnets would reduce it. This is what makes it special. 

Offline antijon

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 211
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #244 on: September 21, 2015, 05:37:26 PM »
@antijon,

Thanks for your participation. A motor twice the size and powerful would consume more input, where-as increasing the motor weight in magnets would reduce it. This is what makes it special.

True, it may reduce the input for a particular load, but that's only saying that the motor wasn't manufactured to be efficient. The motor law is current multiplied by conductor length multiplied by magnetic field equals velocity, or I x L x B = V. Increasing any one of these will increase rotor power. If manufacturers wanted the motor to be more efficient, they could have increased the size of the magnets.

I work with many different types of motors, mostly for fans and blowers, and I can say that what you see is not always what you will get. For instance, you can get two different motors, both rated for the same RPM and HP, yet one will consume 300W more in power. This loss of efficiency goes back to Tesla's descriptions of motor construction. Paraphrasing, but between the stator and rotor the magnetic energy will always equal 100% but the power out is the product of the stator and rotor. So if I had a stator  that was much larger than the rotor, I could say it made up 90% of the magnetic energy. The stator is 90 plus the rotor's 10 equals 100% magnetic energy. But the rotor power out is the product of both, so 90 x 10 = 900. Now if the stator and rotor were more matched in size, say 50 and 50, the magnetic energy would still be 100% but the power out would be 50 x 50 = 2500.

My point in saying that is this, don't assume that a motor is anywhere close to 100% efficient, even a DC motor with no load.

Hey, sorry for not reading the beginning of the thread, but was someone working on a tank circuit motor?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #244 on: September 21, 2015, 05:37:26 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #245 on: September 21, 2015, 06:46:50 PM »
@antijon,

Wasted time designing one before Chaniotakis showed how to link two drain motor cores. He also showed OU results from a magnetic traction motor (Elemen). I sought to combine those two OU effects in one motor generator. I put the finishing touch on that project with the addition of a positioner screw, and no longer any have anything further to add.

I'm searching for a couple of drain motors to do the coil yoking experiment. Even so that would leave me with the extra second rotor right? Good place to start drawing output through a coupler! If you get two motors to try that, the next step could include the other rotor. Mounting that overhead on a screw positioner and testing it's relative strength to distance would be a logical progression.   

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #246 on: September 22, 2015, 08:26:44 PM »
My luck may have taken a turn for the better. I spotted a used appliance parts store in the ally across from my Tico restaurant, and when I went to ask for a synchronous drain tub motor he offered to produce two microwave turntable carousel motors at 3 P.M. today

The next test will be to determine if the 6 pole rotor frequency 0f 3600 hertz is above or below the CMF (Critical Minimum Frequency) for "Lenz Reversal"; One motor driven as an alternator by the other with wall current at 60 hertz and rotor speed of 600 R.P.M. In vs. out comparisons with and without the load of a 120 volt incandescent bulb.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #246 on: September 22, 2015, 08:26:44 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #247 on: September 23, 2015, 02:29:42 PM »
Running the carousel motor as an alternator with the synchronous drain motor would increase the 6 pole magnet frequency by 5 times, from 600 to 3000 R.P.M. That would deliver a frequency of 18,000 compared to 3600. 18K is probably enough speed to achieve CMF and "Lenz Reversal". The twin core synchronous drain motor could spin a long gang of "Reverse Lenz Drag" carousel alternators over the threshold speed. The combination of  powering a spinner with twin core resonance and, generating current with the help of "Lenz Propulsion" alternator output should be capable of self running! We can tap the transformer wrap at 20% to reduce the output voltage from 600 to 120. Attaching the carousel magnet rotor to the drain motor axle solves the bearing issue.

I feel I have a good chance of turning up a few of these synchronous drain motors too to preform these tests.

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #248 on: September 23, 2015, 05:20:06 PM »
I disassembled one of the new Carousel motors, and have unequivocally determined that the magnet rotor polarity is diametric. Six poles N.S. side to side and the case and stator are highly magnetic. After nearly 3 minutes work, the motor's fully transformed into the finished alternator. The magnet rotor runs very strong at 600 R.P.M. The pin bearing is exceptional.

This (Repuestos) parts place stocks the other drain tub synchronous motor too, so I plan to jump right to that test. I'll have two of those used drain motors this afternoon. I should have some exciting results soon after hooking their cores one to the other in series, then connecting them to the turntable alternator.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #248 on: September 23, 2015, 05:20:06 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #249 on: September 23, 2015, 11:14:59 PM »
I have the two different kinds of synchronous motors facing each other with the axles exposed. Look's like nearly a perfect match between the diameter of the plastic rotor gear and the drain motor magnet rotor axle. Shouldn't be any problem at all finding a tiny plastic collar to unite them.   

I set fire to the drain motor impeller with a butane lighter to free it. Worked like a charm. Ready to forge ahead tomorrow. Everyone knows the results I'm looking for: 5 times the rotor speed for the carousel alternator at 3K, should deliver 600 volts at around 20 milliamps for a whopping 10 watts, at a frequency of 18k. CMF would show input drop on load.


Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #250 on: September 24, 2015, 04:25:20 PM »
The tiny sipping straw attached to the disposable beverage cartons fits perfectly around the axle parts. I tested a steady 300 A.C. volts generated by the carousel alternator driven by the drain motor, half of what I pre-calculated. I plan to glue everything tight and try again. So far so good. Came together like magic!

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #250 on: September 24, 2015, 04:25:20 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #251 on: September 24, 2015, 06:23:50 PM »
The plastic straw failed to hold up, got hot and melted after an hour of running. In the meantime I managed to light a 120 volt LED off the carousel alternator, and ran the drain motor backwards with the carousel as a motor. The carousel motor has no problem turning the drain motor as an alternator.

My preliminary measurements show no rise in input amperage with the addition of the 120 volt LED bulb when the turntable motor's reversed as an alternator. I need to search for a better connector. So far the results are as good as could be anticipated. Maybe I can upload some pictures.

Let me add that it's costs a lot of power to turn these kinds of motor rotors alone just due to the magnetic cogging against the stators, regardless of any load, unlike open generator coils. Further testing's in order.

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #252 on: September 24, 2015, 06:53:59 PM »
This carousel alternator has to do the same amount of work whether it's loaded or not and can only run at 60 hertz the way it's configured. The results of no rise in input with addition of load may be illusory at this time.

The Chaniotakis video where he runs a "Lenz Free" D.C. generator appears to be the same illusion. The Generator's already doing it's maximum amount of work against the permanent magnets before the load's connected, so there's no possibility the input can rise. 

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #253 on: September 25, 2015, 01:30:23 PM »
I realized there's no way to get "Slip Turn Torque" from an electrical load with this turntable alternator. The rotor needs a physical load to lower input from drag. It would need a pulley and a fan belt. The Carousel alternator generates a fixed amount of power from a fixed amount of work. The alternator work is the same loaded or unloaded. The anomaly of reduced input from slip is still open for inquiry.

Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4090
Re: Oscillating sine wave LC tank magnet motor.
« Reply #254 on: September 26, 2015, 02:21:52 AM »
The drain motor's rated for 3 Amps at 120 volts. That's 360 watts or nearly 1/2 a horsepower coming from that power hungry synchronous motor. George Chaniotakis shows an "Amazing Drop" in input with a twin core, but the motor is consuming enough power to drive a Go-Cart while ideling.

This makes me wonder what the torque in horse power is with a huge drop in input due to perhaps a saturation "Magnet Switch" effect? Consuming a tenth of the power due to an impedance effect would most likely result in a loss of torque down to .05 of a horsepower for no gain!

Ten times less power input would spin the rotor at 3K, but it would only take ten times less pressure to cause the rotor to slip. Nothing coming!

 

OneLink