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Author Topic: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss  (Read 17964 times)

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2014, 10:24:43 PM »
If reduction in RPM when you "harvest BEMF"  is a problem... just get rid of the rotor.

 ;) ;D ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0sjqoshznU

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Offline synchro1

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2014, 10:29:31 PM »
@Conradelektro,


                        Who wants to grow cynical? The series bifilar coil generates a longitudinal A.C signal over the phase conjunction resonance of 25K that is reinforced by background power that begins to drive a spinning magnet rotor with no additional input. Why don't you remove the magnets from your "Synchro Coil" and try the serial bifilar to power a diametric spinner? The pulsed D.C reed switch motor turns into a synchronous A.C. motor at threshold speed that is so efficient it begins to power itself. This effect is awesome and wrong to trivialize!

Offline dieter

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2014, 12:16:17 AM »
Synchro1 , any working device you can show us?


BTW. Tinsel, yes you can get rid of the rotor, but eg. a  selfoscillating Bedini SSG circuit will draw substancially more current than the same with a rotating rotor., at least that's what some observers of said selfoscillation phenomen (since it is no selfoscillator circuit per sé) said.


Explain that  :P


Regards.

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2014, 12:16:17 AM »
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Offline synchro1

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2014, 12:22:02 AM »
The longitudinal A.C. magnet wave has nothing to do with the A.C. Hertzian sine wave and just penetrates the induction coil, unlike it's transverse compliment. The magnet wave needs a magnet receiver coil to collect the power, whereas the pulsed or A.C. powered series bifilar can inductively couple to another bifilar coil alone, without the magnet core receiver inside the coil to help transform the signal.


The magnet core "Synchro Coil" is not an induction coil that generates current from spinning magnet flux induction, but a magnet wave receiver coil that collects output from the series bifilar power coil generated magnet waves. The spinning magnet powers the series bifilar magnet wave, and the bifilar coil generates the magnet wave output, not the spinning magnet. Not only is this alternator self powering, but the output is Lenz free.

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2014, 01:04:36 AM »
Lucy in the Sky, with Diamonds!
Lucy in the Sky, with Diamonds!
Lucy in the Sky, with Diamonds!
loooooool oh loooooool

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2014, 01:04:36 AM »
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Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2014, 01:00:47 PM »
Synchro1 , any working device you can show us?


BTW. Tinsel, yes you can get rid of the rotor, but eg. a  selfoscillating Bedini SSG circuit will draw substancially more current than the same with a rotating rotor., at least that's what some observers of said selfoscillation phenomen (since it is no selfoscillator circuit per sé) said.


Explain that  :P


Regards.

Why should I? The MHOP is better than Bedini in all respects. It even self-starts. No power need be wasted in turning the rotor. If Bedini motors draw more power without the rotor interfering with their oscillations, that's just too bad for Bedini-builders! When people start desulphating their batteries with the MHOP circuit instead of ridiculous Bedini transistor-burners, they'll see the difference immediately. Heck the money saved by not using the excess copper in the Bedini-coils will pay for the op-amp, and a good high-voltage mosfet is cheaper and outperforms the 2n3055 any day.

Go ahead, prove me wrong!
 ;)

Offline synchro1

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2014, 05:51:39 PM »
@Tinselkoala and Milehigh,


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pr3Olkd_5EI


Here's a good video from Tinselkoala on the Faraday cage. Tinselkoala demonstrates that his wireless transmitter coil is producing two types of waves, a transverse and a longitudinal. The inductive coupling is completely curtailed by the cage, but TK has a magnet inductor inside that registers negative voltage. This looks like a modified Bedini style "Scalar Wave" detecter. My first question is; What would the voltage polarity read if the inductor magnets were reversed in direction, rather then the DMM electrodes?


Secondly; We need a similar test on two pulse coils, one single wrap and the other series bifilar. The Faraday cage should stall the single pulse coil spinner, and allow the series bifilar, magnet wave powered spinner, to continue to turn with what appears to be a negative voltage wave.


I wrote and asked TK to test Chiral Homopolar balance magnets this way to prove or disprove Jerry Bayles contention that they are oscillated by longitudinal gravity waves at 2Pi hertz resonance. These tests are very important, and Tinselkoala already has an apparatus in inventory.   


 

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2014, 05:51:39 PM »
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Offline dieter

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2014, 07:58:06 PM »
This became pretty off topic.

Offline synchro1

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2014, 12:40:14 AM »
@Dieiter,


 The MHOP circuit was developed on the "Self Accelerating Reed Switch Thread". 

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2014, 12:40:14 AM »
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Offline conradelektro

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2014, 10:54:51 AM »
If reduction in RPM when you "harvest BEMF"  is a problem... just get rid of the rotor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0sjqoshznU

I did not understand this rotor-less idea at the time TinselKoala showed it in this forum and on YouTube.

But now finally I get the idea and wonder if this can be done with a hall sensor and an Arduino similar to what Mr. Naudin is doing here http://jnaudin.free.fr/dlenz/DLE23en.htm?

Naudin is using an Arduino and a hall sensor to drive a simple pulse motor (http://jnaudin.free.fr/dlenz/DLE23en.htm), but may be one could also forget the rotor and place the hall sensor somewhere near the (drive) coil. Once a signal from the hall sensor is available one can program the timing for switching the coil (positive or negative feedback).

The opto coupler and the BUZ11 in Naudin's circuit could be replaced by a MOSFET. Although the opto coupler might be a prudent way of separating the high power coil switching from the Arduino.

If the aim is to get good spikes from coil switching, a rotor is indeed not necessary. Going further, the feed back (hall sensor or trigger coil) might not be necessary if using a microprocessor to switch the coil. The timing can be entirely done by the microprocessor.

Greetings, Conrad

Offline synchro1

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #25 on: April 13, 2014, 05:14:19 PM »
@Tinselkoala,


You asked me to show you something. Review this 300,000 rpm magnet spinner of alphacentauro1111:


He's spinning a small tube magnet inside the core of a Tesla series bifilar coil. This rpm is way over any reed switch speed. The reed switch can act as a first stage booster untill the "Scalar Wave" takes over and powers the spinning magnet with it's internal trailing pole vortex amplitude. I use a spiral Tesla series bifilar, and got the same results with a bearing and thread spool Tesla series bifilar solenoid as well, as I described.


What alphacentauro1111 dosen't tell us , is that his power coil is not hooked up to any pulsed input source!


www.youtube.com/results?search_query=300000+rpm+magnet+spinne

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #25 on: April 13, 2014, 05:14:19 PM »
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Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2014, 05:32:29 PM »
Yeah, right. He also isn't confirming the RPM with any other method. I've "reviewed" this video before.

And I note that you have posted one of my "alt.snakeoil" videos with your own interpretation. You certainly aren't afraid of looking silly, I'll give you that much!

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2014, 05:37:57 PM »
I did not understand this rotor-less idea at the time TinselKoala showed it in this forum and on YouTube.

But now finally I get the idea and wonder if this can be done with a hall sensor and an Arduino similar to what Mr. Naudin is doing here http://jnaudin.free.fr/dlenz/DLE23en.htm?

Naudin is using an Arduino and a hall sensor to drive a simple pulse motor (http://jnaudin.free.fr/dlenz/DLE23en.htm), but may be one could also forget the rotor and place the hall sensor somewhere near the (drive) coil. Once a signal from the hall sensor is available one can program the timing for switching the coil (positive or negative feedback).

The opto coupler and the BUZ11 in Naudin's circuit could be replaced by a MOSFET. Although the opto coupler might be a prudent way of separating the high power coil switching from the Arduino.

If the aim is to get good spikes from coil switching, a rotor is indeed not necessary. Going further, the feed back (hall sensor or trigger coil) might not be necessary if using a microprocessor to switch the coil. The timing can be entirely done by the microprocessor.

Greetings, Conrad

BUZ11 is a mosfet. The IRF3205 is cheaper and has similar if not better spec. Using an optocoupler to protect the Arduino is a good idea but even better, if driving a mosfet, is to use a gate current driver (since the Arduino only supplies 5 v at the digital outputs) like the MarkE gate boost circuit. However I've driven the mosfet directly with good results too, for example in my Arduino-controlled magnetic levitation apparatus.

Pretty soon you will be "devolving" all the way back to the simple switched mosfet/inductive load system that is the heart of the "Ainslie affair"! All you need for massive inductive spikes and ringing is a heavy inductance and a fast turn-off of the current through that inductance.

Offline synchro1

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2014, 05:42:33 PM »

Here's a video from Tinselkoala,

This is a piece of crap:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-Xrwt-50AA

Quote from youtube comment:

"I was inspired to build a little magnet spinner by synchro1's interesting work with a large powerful sphere magnet.

I don't have such a magnet, but I did have some little discs. So I mounted a disc magnet on an axle and support, very crude, and wound a couple of coils to exite it with. Assembled with hot glue and driven by the Interstate F43 function generator with a sine or a square wave, the little contraption spins at nearly 12000 RPM.

I've not started looking at output from the system yet. The coils are wired in series. I'll also be trying parallel wiring to see if there's a difference. I would like to use a self-triggering system so that the coil drive power can be triggered by the magnet's rotation directly, but the circuit I tried, posted by conradelectro, didn't work, so I'm still fiddling. Maybe I didn't have the right transistors".

What you fail to understand, is that alphacentauro1111 is not powering the tiny magnet tube spinner with pulse input!

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Reed switches, Hall sensors, trigger coils... discuss
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2014, 05:52:22 PM »
What you fail to understand is that he is not confirming his RPM with any other method.

If you think my work is "a piece of crap"..... then I strongly encourage you to STOP POSTING IT and post some work of your own.




 

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