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Author Topic: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow  (Read 40042 times)

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #45 on: April 05, 2014, 09:45:58 PM »
Dave:

After all that harshness, let me switch it back to the positive.  I am offering to help you understand how a few simple circuits work, including the coils and capacitors if there are any.  But I won't spoon feed you the answers because my experience from being around here a long time is that spoon feeding doesn't work.  If you want to learn then you have set your mind to it and make some timing diagrams as the first step.  If not then that's fine also, your choice.

MileHigh

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Dave45

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #46 on: April 05, 2014, 11:26:32 PM »
Roflmao
Have you gotta surprise coming  8)

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2014, 03:40:44 AM »
 MileHigh

Below is a basic ionization circuit, the electrodes take on a pos and neg charge.

Yet you scoff at the idea of a pos and neg charged coil, why because one's a coil and one's an electrode,


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2014, 03:40:44 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline MileHigh

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #48 on: April 06, 2014, 05:10:18 AM »
Dave:

I'll bite.  What are you laughing about and what's the surprise?

You posted a diagram where in the upper section you have a high-voltage transformer and some diodes.  It has nothing to do with the ordinary operation of a coil in a circuit.  You seem to be fixated on ionization.

The lower part of the diagram you have added coils to the extremities of the ionizer.  That's typical, it's a meaningless nonsensical thing to do.  If you are alluding to the fact that the coils are charged with high-voltage and that means that they are "charged" coils, that's just plain silly again.  The coils at the ends of the wire do not function like coils, they may as well be mylar balloons.  So you are shooting blanks.

The real issue:  Do you want to post a simple normal circuit and go through the exercise of making a timing diagram for it?

MileHigh

Dave45

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #49 on: April 06, 2014, 01:43:49 PM »
 You seem to be fixated on ionization.
Yea I think your right

That's typical, it's a meaningless nonsensical thing to do
lol, for you maybe

they are "charged" coils, that's just plain silly again
You can lead a horse to water but you cant make him drink

The ether is all around you its in the air you breath but its in a combined neutral state, ionization breaks the bonds and separates the charges then they can be collected.
Even a low frequency low voltage system is ionizing the air around it but the problem is by running both pos and neg legs to the same transformer it works like a static neutralizer canceling any gain that is being created.

You should read up on ionization, static eliminators, air purifiers educate yourself a little  ;)

later
dave

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #49 on: April 06, 2014, 01:43:49 PM »
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Dave45

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #50 on: April 06, 2014, 02:21:35 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txmKr69jGBk


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7_8Gc_Llr8
Would you say the charge is only moving in one direction, try both

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #51 on: April 06, 2014, 03:14:10 PM »
Dave:

Quote
You can lead a horse to water but you cant make him drink

Please tell me what your "charged" coils do and how they are different from high-potential mylar balloons.

You are confusing the alleged ether with negatively and positively charged ions.  Just the wind is creating ions all the time.  Big deal.

Quote
You should read up on ionization, static eliminators, air purifiers educate yourself a little

That has absolutely nothing to do with how a coil works.  You are deflecting.

Quoting myself:  "The real issue:  Do you want to post a simple normal circuit and go through the exercise of making a timing diagram for it?"

You are running away from this question.  You have been pondering this stuff for five years but you are afraid to broach the issue of constructing a timing diagram for a simple circuit.  No timing diagram equals no understanding and self-imposed ignorance.  You won't drink.  It's a shame and it's why scammers can get away with stealing other people's money all the time.

MileHigh

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #51 on: April 06, 2014, 03:14:10 PM »
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Offline MileHigh

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #52 on: April 06, 2014, 03:30:23 PM »
Dave:

Quote
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7_8Gc_Llr8
Would you say the charge is only moving in one direction, try both

I would say that there are positive and negative ions in the smoke and that they are attracted to their respective plates.

Now, lets say there is a negative plate on the left and a positive plate on the right.  In between you have the ionized candle smoke.

The positive ions will be attracted to the negative plate therefore will move to the left.  That means conventional current is moving to the left.

The negative ions will be attracted to the positive plate therefore will move to the right.  That means conventional current is moving to the left.

Holy crap Batman, in both cases conventional current is moving to the left.  There is a negative plate on the left and a positive plate on the right.  Conventional current flows from positive to negative, so that means to the left.

See Dave, the big "brain leap" is to note that positive ions moving to the left represent the same current flow direction as negative ions moving to the right.  It's the big "brain leap" that you and others can't cope with with respect to conventional current flow and how it doesn't make a damn difference in the world when it comes to analyzing the behaviour of circuits, which is what it's all about.

And that brings us back full circle where you can't produce a timing diagram for a simple circuit, and therefore you don't understand the operation of the simple circuit, including the operation of the coil in the simple circuit.

MileHigh

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #53 on: April 06, 2014, 04:24:21 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txmKr69jGBk


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7_8Gc_Llr8
Would you say the charge is only moving in one direction, try both

The first one has nothing to do with ionization. The induced eddy currents in the plate cause an opposite magnetic field and the two fields repel and produce the levitation. The induced eddy currents also dissipate lots of power in the plate so you can cook on the levitated plate.

The second one is a standard demonstration, I first saw in high school sometime in the last century. Yes, a flame is a plasma, with both positive and negative ions. So? Positive ions are attracted to the more negative plate, and negative ions are attracted to the more positive plate. Do you have enough information in the video to decide which plate is more positive than the other one?
I was waiting for the guy to accidentally touch one of the plates with his hand.... even though there isn't much energy in the output of that machine, he's still in grave danger if he takes the discharge from one hand to the other across his chest. He's violating the first rule of HV experimentation: keep one hand in your pocket at all times.

Here's a demo of an electrostatic oil jet coming off the top of a tiny VDG machine:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2lTeGH-lws

And here's me, taking a 30 kV shock across my chest:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpemKuf6X_c
Fortunately for me there was not a lot of energy behind that jolt.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #53 on: April 06, 2014, 04:24:21 PM »
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Dave45

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #54 on: April 06, 2014, 05:03:05 PM »
 MH
So what do you think a timing diagram is going to prove.
you do the timing diagram and do it for both voltage and the current
then do the actual experiment

whats it going to prove, nothing

MrT
 Yea the first vid has nothing to do with ionization just thought it was cool

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #55 on: April 06, 2014, 05:09:16 PM »
So tell me MH is your timing diagram going to show the high voltage bemf hitting the switch
http://makeagif.com/i/dLlRx8

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #55 on: April 06, 2014, 05:09:16 PM »
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Offline MileHigh

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #56 on: April 06, 2014, 05:16:30 PM »
Dave:

Quote
So what do you think a timing diagram is going to prove.
you do the timing diagram and do it for both voltage and the current
then do the actual experiment

whats it going to prove, nothing

That's a total cop out.  It's clear that like many "talkers" about electronics on the forums, you run away when you are asked to produce a timing diagram.

It's about you proving to yourself that you will be able to learn and then actually do it yourself after a couple of examples.  Then you won't be putting up nonsensical circuits like the one with the two coils at the ends of the wire.  You will realize how foolish that is.

MileHigh

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #57 on: April 06, 2014, 05:18:31 PM »
Quote
So tell me MH is your timing diagram going to show the high voltage bemf hitting the switch
http://makeagif.com/i/dLlRx8

Of course it will.  That's a simple circuit, why don't you do a timing diagram for it?
   

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #58 on: April 06, 2014, 05:47:24 PM »
Tesla talked about people like you, is this how you evaluate other peoples experiments timing diagrams instead of doing the  actual experiments.
How do you expect to find any anomaly doing experiments this way.

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Conventional current flow VS Electron current flow
« Reply #59 on: April 06, 2014, 06:05:29 PM »
Dave:

I did all of these types of experiments between 35 and 33 years ago in school.  Then I worked for five years where perhaps 30% of my time was spent on an electronics bench with a scope and a logic analyzer.  Meanwhile I am sure that you have read some of my postings where I analyze circuits.  When you read those postings, does it sound to you like I have a decent grasp of electronics?  When people say to me the "you don't do experiments" line it's a cop out.

What's one full year of working on an electronics bench?  50 x 40 = 2000 hours.  So that means from work I have about 3000 hours of work bench time.  I will throw in another 1500 hours for everything else over 35 years.  So I have about 4500 hours of time spent working on an electronics bench.  Is that good enough for you?

Why don't you take a shot at doing the timing diagram?  There is no need to be evasive or afraid.

MileHigh

 

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