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Author Topic: Inductive Pulse Switch.  (Read 6321 times)

Offline Tradie

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Inductive Pulse Switch.
« on: February 18, 2014, 11:26:13 PM »
Hello,
Im having issues with my latest experiment and I have not been able to get any help or advice in which direction to go.
I have been pulsing current through an inductor and out again to a load at between 2000 and 4000hz.
Through basic testing I have calculated that minus the losses through the primary circuit I am achieving a peak of 184% more energy through to a secondary circuit than the initial input.
Even if i dont count the initial losses of the prime mover, I am achieving a peak of 123% output versus input.
Attached is a PDF of some results.
The strange thing about this switch is that the current has to flow through 6 ohms of coils, 4 individual carbon brushes and it still puts out more voltage than it puts in. The losses through the above mentioned and serious sparking should bring efficiency well below 50%.

Some older videos showing the switch.
http://youtu.be/UeiO4JCC1Lk
http://youtu.be/a0KpRymlC0o
http://youtu.be/JoavKWYE0-E
http://youtu.be/EnwkXiSQW6U

Im at a bit of a loss as to how im getting these results and how to move forward.
If any techies could have a look and suggest some options?

Thanks,
Tradie.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Inductive Pulse Switch.
« on: February 18, 2014, 11:26:13 PM »

Offline Floor

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2014, 11:21:20 PM »
What Kind of a "meter" is it,  in your schematic ?  Volt, Amp, Watt ?

Smooth, steady, DC,  Electric  POWER = simply Amps x volts. 

However  Voltage <> power, and  Amperage <> power

Even rectified DC has a pulse (Half wave)  or ripple (full wave),

Either way, the voltage, doesn't measure correctly / with total accuracy,  with a DC volt meter unless the current and voltage are
smooth / steady,  that is to say, with out much of a wave component within the current

Amperage and power meters (Depending upon their design type) are affected by the "form" of the electricity as well.

                                                I hope this was helpful

                                        Happy experimentation

                                                        floor

Offline Tradie

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2014, 11:47:35 PM »
Measurements were taken with a Fluke Process meter and a Cabac T9000 tong.
Attached PDF highlights actual measurements taken during live testing.
Voltages were taken at the same time with different meters then cross referenced with each other to a known source.
Both meters were within .1V of each other.

Rectified AC with Full wave bridge and capacitor cleans up the ripples and in my opinion would not swing results to this extent.
I've tried inline ammeters, however I get totally different results again.
The inline ammeters drop the secondary voltage for no apparent reason.

I've been a sparky for a decade and I have seen plenty of floating voltages, but these all disappear under load.
Some of the loads are 1000W yet the Secondary voltage is still above the primary by a long way.

I agree with the intermittent DC comment but this still doesn't explain the voltage spikes under constant load.
I have no doubt that the secondary wave form is dirty as hell, but that's the entire point of the machine.
I'm measuring AC/DC voltages and currents through the secondary even when it travels through the bridge.
Using standard ohms law is one way to look at these results but i'm wondering if there is a better, clearer way.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2014, 11:47:35 PM »
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Offline Floor

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2014, 04:56:00 PM »
cool

I've watched experimenter after experimenter, struggle with essentially the
same kind of measurement questions arising, here on the forum. 

The only suggestion I have heard proposed, and that I see as a reasonable and direct
approach to the problem, is temperature measurement.

If there is real world anomalous power present  in your "resistive load 4 x 100 watts"
Then it will show as "brute force"  temp change in that load.

You will need thermal insulation of your load and an ambient temperature measurement, for comparison.

                       cheers
                       floor

Offline tim123

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2014, 06:01:18 PM »
Hi Tradie,
  It sounds interesting, but I'm not sure i understand...

 - In your schematic, what exactly is the thing with 2 sets of brushes?
 - What does it mean by '2nd set as close a possible'?
 - What's an 'inductive pulse switch'?
 - And the obvious question - if it puts out more than it consumes - can't you just loop it - to power itself?

:)
Regards, Tim

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2014, 06:01:18 PM »
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Offline Tradie

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2014, 06:33:14 AM »
Thanks Floor,

I have heard the water heating technique mentioned but it raises other variables yet again.
I've got a few thermocouples here so if i get desperate ill rig them up.

The "4 X 100W load" is just an approxiamation of what it should be using at 240V.
The now not so common light bulb is just a handy way to add or remove a load through multiple light sockets wired in parallel.
It is definitly bright and sure does burn my hand if i dont use gloves when removing them so it sure has some "power" there just not exact on how much.

Tradie.

Offline Tradie

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2014, 11:10:23 AM »
G'day Tim,

Check out my videos and they will give you a visual of the below.

The "thing" with the two brushes is a universal motor.
Ive machined a bracket that allows me to install multiple brushes onto one commutator.

The '2nd set is the 2nd set of brushes. Ive found that I can transfer maximum power when the brush is set closest to the primary brush set.
I get different results with the angle of the brushes and also when I split the secondary brushes out of alignment.

The "Inductive Pulse Switch" is as follows.
1.Supply pushes voltage into the coil of the motor and charges the coil, in normal motors this is where it all ends. The motor spins and voila mechanical torque.

2.In this motor the capacitance left in the rotor coil is diverted back into another load.

3.The second set of brushes is where the switching exists, Which is why its in the mechanical section.
   The only electronic part of this machine is the diodes. Induction pulse switch is the best I can describe for the mean time.

4.I have had some successes in using the secondary brushes to divert power back into the motor, shown through increased RPM's.
   To do this I mechanically coupled two motors with double brush sets to each other. The mechanical coupling provided the timing.
   The circuit worked a little like a figure 8 shuffling backwards and forwards between each other.

Under all the other testing procedures Voltage was always lower, which was expected.
The power must travel through the primary motor before it can reach the secondary, plus losses through both sets of brushes and sparking.
Having a higher voltage under load doesnt make a whole lot of sense to me and thats my hangup.

Tradie.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2014, 11:10:23 AM »
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Offline tim123

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2014, 05:00:11 PM »
Hi Tradie,
  thanks for the explanation. It's an interesting line of reasearch. :)

It sounds like you're getting a high-frequency ripple in the output signal that's confusing the DMM.

I notice in your diagram that there's no smoothing cap on the output FWBR. Perhaps if you add one the results would change?

Regards, Tim

Offline Tradie

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2014, 09:23:25 PM »
Hello Tim,
Yes they do change, but if i cant understand whats happening at this juncture then moving forward or sideways is only guessing.
Ive tried putting yet another FWB across the resistive load to remove any AC but it doesnt seem to work.
On the Load side of the 2nd FWB I still get both AC and DC voltages and currents.

For instance in one test im using 136VDC supply.
After the primary brushes im recording 121VDC at 2.6A and 58VAC at 4.5A
after the secondary brushes im recording 116VDC at 2.5A and 4VAC 7.6A
This experiment used in line analogue DC ammeters and changed the results.

I fear if I put a cap in then it will cancel out that ripple and automatically lose power.
At the moment I think im harvesting the DC coming from the motor as well as any harmonics etc. and these are adding to each other through the bridge.

Tradie.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2014, 09:23:25 PM »
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Offline tim123

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2014, 10:22:55 PM »
Hi Tradie,
  Putting a (big as you can) cap in parallel with the load won't change the amount of power available. It'll just stop the ripple.

If you do that - and you meter reads less -which it probably will - you've not 'lost' power - you've just got an accurate measurement - whereas before you didn't.

If you do that and it still reads more - then let us know. :)

Regards, Tim

Offline Tradie

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2014, 04:58:23 AM »
Hello Tim,

I put a 6 milli farad (the size of a pack of cards).
In parallel with the second Bridge.
It made no differance to the results.

The reason I say that it might lose power is beause I believe im getting some flyback from the PM motor/Generator.
This could have been an inverse wave cancelling out the input.
However it seems that this is not the case.

The Cap did not make the slightest of differance under load.
If I remove some of the lightbulbs the voltage will go even higher.

Tradie.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2014, 04:58:23 AM »
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Offline tim123

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2014, 09:58:13 AM »
Hi Tradie,
  Adding the cap should totally stop any ripple - and without one there would definitely be plenty. 6 milli Farads is a lot of capacitance...

It sounds like you need an oscilloscope mate. So you can see what's going on there.

If the output FWBR is genuinely putting out more than the input one - then you just need a (DPST) switch on it - to close the loop once it's up to speed... A switch is cheaper than a 'scope...

You know - the rotor on a Uni-motor - all the brush sections are connected... If you measure the resistance between any 2 pads - it should be the same. The brushes basically 'divide' the rotor coil into two - and there's always current running through *all* the rotor windings.

So that means your 2nd set of brushes on the rotor are *electrically connected* to the input supply. So they contain that current plus any current derived from their motion within the stator field.

EDIT: Not only that - but they will 'short-circuit' the rotor - to an extent - reducing the flux in the rest of the rotor - and presumably decreasing it's torque(?)

Hope that helps... :)
Tim

Offline Tradie

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2014, 10:25:39 AM »
Tim,

Yep that was my drama, the old commoned up commutator trick.
I was hoping to get away without rewiring the rotor but shit happens.

Thanks,
Tradie.

Offline tim123

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2014, 10:42:02 AM »
No probs. Happy to be able to help. I wouldn't have been able to a year ago. :)

I think re-wiring one of those rotors would be pretty hard...
What's your aim - maybe there's a simpler way?

Offline Tradie

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Re: Inductive Pulse Switch.
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2014, 09:18:05 PM »
Tim,

Once I removed the old windings it was pretty easy.
Its running a little hot so i'm starting again with more turns and less coils.
The aim is for mechanical switching mid stream of the motor.
Hoping to be able to negate back emf.

Thanks,
Tradie.

 

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