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Author Topic: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer  (Read 44880 times)

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #30 on: May 13, 2014, 12:53:08 PM »
Something to ponder  :)

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #31 on: May 13, 2014, 02:19:27 PM »
Something that has me stumped if the diagram is correct where does the current come in.

This is perplexing, I will continue to study, everything is subject to change until we have a logical working model.

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #32 on: May 13, 2014, 03:26:30 PM »
The model does not seem to be correct,
If we look a full wave bridge we can see there is a pos and neg pulse hitting both sides of the secondary and if we look at the model it doesnt fit.  :-\


Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #33 on: May 13, 2014, 03:33:39 PM »
Im not looking at the pulse right, if we look at the full wave bridge there is a pos and neg hitting both sides of the primary. The same would be true for the mains coming into our homes, its coming from a transformer.

I think the current portion of the wave is coming into view



Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #34 on: May 13, 2014, 04:08:23 PM »
Rainy day

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #35 on: May 13, 2014, 04:11:04 PM »
Ya know the grid cycles at 120 hz but we get only 60 hz in our homes....................why

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2014, 04:42:33 PM »
Ya know the grid cycles at 120 hz but we get only 60 hz in our homes....................why
If current cycles at 60hz and the voltage cycled at 60hz=========120hz

Wrong terminology

If neg cycles at 60hz and pos cycled at 60hz==========120hz

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2014, 05:18:48 PM »
Why is the current and voltage 90 degrees out of phase
We are hitting the primary at 180 degrees, one side then the other.

Four pulses two pos and two neg alternately broken down - 1/4 phase - 90 degrees

 :-\



Offline MarkE

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6830
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2014, 05:25:28 PM »
If current cycles at 60hz and the voltage cycled at 60hz=========120hz

Wrong terminology

If neg cycles at 60hz and pos cycled at 60hz==========120hz
I think you are confusing voltage and current cycles with the power half cycles.  The mains voltage is a sine wave at 60Hz.  Each half of that cycle the magnitude of the voltage and the magnitude of the current and the magnitude of the power all go from zero to maximum and back to zero.  If the load is purely resistive they all do that in unison. 

Dave45

  • Guest
Re: Russian Overunity Resonance Transformer
« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2014, 08:02:43 PM »
I think you are confusing voltage and current cycles with the power half cycles.  The mains voltage is a sine wave at 60Hz.  Each half of that cycle the magnitude of the voltage and the magnitude of the current and the magnitude of the power all go from zero to maximum and back to zero.  If the load is purely resistive they all do that in unison.
Easily said but put it into a descriptive drawing, I could talk about it all day but to put it into a mechanical format is a little harder.

That being said I do appreciate the feedback.

dave