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Hydrogen energy => Motors or Vehicles running on HHO or Hydrogen only, no gasoline => Topic started by: Photonfanatic on November 20, 2013, 01:05:26 AM

Title: Just curious, questions from a newb
Post by: Photonfanatic on November 20, 2013, 01:05:26 AM
I thought that if anywhere, this is the site to ask. Are any of those high MPG hho claims for real? Is there anyone out there that has proven that their 1992 chevy S-10 blazer has gotten 43 mpg running an HHO setup? Is there any proof? Or was all that stuff just a bunch of hogwash? Taking for granted of course, that the driver has great driving habits.

Does HHO really double fuel economy, as so many have claimed? If its installed and set up properly. Or are the gains just negligible at best?
Title: Re: Just curious, questions from a newb
Post by: Floor on November 20, 2013, 05:00:37 PM
I think it's possible to get 42 mpg in a blazer using an hho system, but probably only at low vehicle speed / wind resistance and other ideal conditions.  There has been considerable and reliable research into the hho subject, but also there are unreliable claims. 

In general straight water injection has produced just as good mpg as hho, although emissions testing has been better with the hho.

hho / water injection cleans up old dirty engines is one reason for increases in mpg.

clean / all ready higher mpg vehicles show less improvement in mpg.

Keep checking the web and you'll find good stats.   Sorry I didn't  find the link I would like to have posted for you.

                       cheers

                                     floor
Title: Re: Just curious, questions from a newb
Post by: truesearch on November 20, 2013, 05:28:00 PM
@Floor:


I'm curious about the "water-injection" option for myself. Do you have any personal experience in that area that you would care to share?


I still have my old-school, non-computer, carbureted big-block that I'd like to get more efficient. . . .  :-\


truesearch
Title: Re: Just curious, questions from a newb
Post by: Floor on November 20, 2013, 09:51:11 PM
@trusearch

My Neighbors dad (year 1972) put water injection on his sons 64 Shelby mustang.  They were convinced that  they got better mileage.
But my only other experience with it,  is just reading on the web.  I'm convinced that it's a proven and simple to apply tech.

There is tons of info on the web, some of which claim to debunk the technology, but most of what I have read supports significantly   improved MPG. 

I have an old ford van (351  cu in) that I would like to put injection on. It needs the timing chain replaced right now as well (not running).
Older vehicles are heavy, and this is one big reasons why newer vehicles have better MPG. 

Try WWW. efficientmileage.com/water-injection html for a good starting point.

                                         cheers
                                                floor
Title: Re: Just curious, questions from a newb
Post by: truesearch on November 20, 2013, 10:21:15 PM
@Floor:


Thanks for the info and direction. I'll check out that link.


What I have is a 1973 model Ford F100 pickup with a 360cu under the hood. It's a blast to drive but only makes about 10mpg  :(  It's in great shape with only 69k original miles but the fuel mileage takes most of the fun out of it for me.


truesearch
Title: Re: Just curious, questions from a newb
Post by: Photonfanatic on November 20, 2013, 10:44:12 PM
Simply plopping in a much newer engine out of the junkyard would probably net you close to 10 mpg. Especially if you got one of those new 5.0's out of the new F150. They only get about 19 on a good day, but your truck is significantly lighter than all these luxury oriented elongated newer trucks. But then, they say, you can't really add HHO to newer engines very well. At least, not without some reprogramming of the computer. From what I've read, it tries to compensate for the detected hho by dumping more fuel lol. Thus destroying the gains.

I've also heard that you don't wanna run it long term unless you get forged pistons, and high grade stainless steel valves in the cylinder heads. Heard it can tear them up. Don't know if there is any truth to any of that though. But these engines were never designed with any other kind of stuff being injected into them, so I'd think its worth a look.

Title: Re: Just curious, questions from a newb
Post by: Floor on November 21, 2013, 03:46:57 AM
Seems reasonable to me, that steam would corrode valves, pistons and cylinders pretty quickly.  Definitely worth looking into that aspect, unless the engine is pretty well shot all ready. 

A DIY hho or water system has to be is a lot easier and less expensive than installing a used engine.

                            floor