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Solid States Devices => solid state devices => Topic started by: DWP on April 20, 2013, 04:56:04 AM

Title: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: DWP on April 20, 2013, 04:56:04 AM
While searching for a practical free energy device I came across the BiTT and it looked promising but when I was about to build one I came across some confusing info in this document http://www.slideshare.net/ThaneCHeins/femm-bi-tt-simulation-1 
I also read some discouraging comments from other people which made me think that the BiTT is not a PRACTICAL free energy device and cannot be used to power even low power equipment  like a laptop or even a 40 Watt light bulb so here is *MY UNDERSTANDING* of the BiTT limitations PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG:



Limitation #1
Getting a high COP depends on the loads on the secondaries


Limitation #2
The load on each secondary must be equal to the load on the other


Limitation #3
All BiTT replications I've ever came across provide less than 20 Watts of free energy
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: Jack Noskills on April 29, 2013, 01:20:58 PM
I built this couple of years ago and it gave more power out than in. Same picture was in the original BiTT thread and more details there arounf page 18. Primary is in the middle and secondaries outside. There must be enough impedance in the primary so that when there is no load idle current is low. Use high number of turns or parallel tuning cap. The amount of free power is proportional to surface area of the cores. I used equal coils in all sections.
 
Later on I tried high frequency version using different permeability cores. I had low permeability ferrite rod core for primary and high permeability toroid for secondary. No picture available but principle is the same. It did not work, maybe permeability difference was too high, or maybe permeability has to be the same for all cores.
 
For high frequency this can easily be made self runner, and I would use caduceus windings for ever coil because they alone amplify power. But my skills are limited so cannot build anything complicated. Maybe a suitable driver could be taken from mobilephone charger if you can get the AC out.
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: TinselKoala on April 29, 2013, 01:42:56 PM
I built this couple of years ago and it gave more power out than in.
No, it didn't.
Quote
Same picture was in the original BiTT thread and more details there arounf page 18. Primary is in the middle and secondaries outside. There must be enough impedance in the primary so that when there is no load idle current is low. Use high number of turns or parallel tuning cap. The amount of free power is proportional to surface area of the cores. I used equal coils in all sections.
 
Later on I tried high frequency version using different permeability cores. I had low permeability ferrite rod core for primary and high permeability toroid for secondary. No picture available but principle is the same. It did not work, maybe permeability difference was too high, or maybe permeability has to be the same for all cores.
 
For high frequency this can easily be made self runner,
So make a self runner then. Oh... wait..... that's right, you have no skills, you want someone else to make it for you. Too bad nobody can, even though it "can easily be made self runner."

Quote
and I would use caduceus windings for ever coil because they alone amplify power.
Prove it. Demonstrate the truth of your statement that "Caduceus windings alone amplify power."
Quote
But my skills are limited so cannot build anything complicated. Maybe a suitable driver could be taken from mobilephone charger if you can get the AC out.

And maybe not.

If your skills are limiting your performance.... practice more. Develop your skills, don't brag about your lack of them.
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: Jack Noskills on April 30, 2013, 09:30:42 AM
I made caduceus coil on a nanoperm toroid that was 170 meters long. I took AC from grid through 1 uf cap and put it through a lamp, there was not much light. Then I put this caduceous monster in between, it had about 48 ohms DC resistance. Lamp got brighter, it should have got dimmer ?
 
That is what I did and that is what I got. I was insane enough to build that but would not recommend to anyone. It is much easier to use high frequency and just few meters of wire to get the same effect.
 
This trafo above needs a push. If it was pushed with X watts, it gave 1.7 times watts out. OU is ratio determined by the ratio of core areas. I used small iron core and it limited power transfer. Easiest way to build would be to use C and E-I cores combined, MetGlass would be good.
 
I am trying to give people ideas, if you don't like them it is not my problem. I have no plans to go further with this, fun part is to figure it out, not make a million copies of it. Anyone is free to try and after all I see nothing new with this, it is just a different version of BiTT.
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: Jack Noskills on April 30, 2013, 11:53:46 AM
Limitation list, referring to my version,
 
Limitation #1
Getting a high COP depends on the loads on the secondaries
 
I used lots of turns on secondaries. There is secondary feedback occurring so more flux secondary can create more power it creates in the other secondary.
 
Limitation #2
The load on each secondary must be equal to the load on the other
 
Secondaries can be connected together provided that polarities match. I actually shorted one secondary and took power from one secondary only. I got more power out that way.
 
Limitation #3
All BiTT replications I've ever came across provide less than 20 Watts of free energy
 
This depends on the size of the core and number of turns. Best result is achieved using high impedance primary, lots of turns or tank circuit to block current flow at used frequency when idle. Also there has to be a push. Even if core could give 1 kw, you can take that with a COP only if primary is pushed at 1 kw.

Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: poynt99 on April 30, 2013, 03:12:49 PM
Limitation #3
All BiTT replications I've ever came across provide less than 20 Watts of free energy
Show us one that has even 2W of free energy (properly proven), and I'll give you my contribution to the OU prize.
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: DWP on April 30, 2013, 10:54:08 PM
@ Jack Noskills
I really appreciate your help
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: Jack Noskills on May 02, 2013, 10:55:14 AM
I built my proto using scrap parts, core from transformer of my Amiga computer and dense coils from christmas light trafos. It took about ten minutes to build and anyone can do it with proper parts. I realised it was like Thane's BiTT after I made it, just no air gap. It was small enough even with iron core so it could be used to power portable PC forever, though its shape should be flattened. With modern high permeability materials it would weigh less that current power sources in portable PCs. Could be made small enough to fit in handsets too.
 
If you look what kind of power levels others have made then this is a toy compared to them, but they do not reveal their secrets unlike Thane. To open the gates, all you need is one device mass productised then others and better ones will soon follow as there will be more pressure from general public.
 
Therefore it is important to prevent all OU devices from entering to market. Even if a device gives just one watt more out than in it must not succeed. There are big players out there whose main and only job is to enforce current status quo, it is a multi million business alone. You can read more about their tactics from PJK's website. These web sites are a major source of information for them so beware.
 
In order to fight this, you must use covert tactics to succeed. You don't say a mass productised device is OU until it is being widely used, or better yet you don't say it at all. People just wonder that hmm, seems that my PC does not need to be recharged, now isn't that odd ? You could say it is using energy from radio stations, body heat, gravity or what ever clever crap you can imagine. Phase one device could be such that it lasts one week at a time and then 'recharges' in 10 minutes. There could be a software running that periodically stops operation. Later on you would release upgrade that terminates this sw.
 
When you put current in a wire, you get magnetic field around it for free. This field can be used to create more power, which in turn creates also magnetic field for free. And so on. It is that simple. Too bad all that is teached about trafos is the stupid E-I/C-I core and step-down model of power conversion.
 
All you need is one device and the domino effect will begin. Thane gave us one, now make it happen people.
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: poynt99 on May 02, 2013, 03:01:27 PM
When you put current in a wire, you get magnetic field around it for free. This field can be used to create more power, which in turn creates also magnetic field for free. And so on. It is that simple. Too bad all that is teached about trafos is the stupid E-I/C-I core and step-down model of power conversion.
For free? So you are saying that the "current" itself didn't cost you anything to apply to the wire?  :o
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: Jack Noskills on May 03, 2013, 09:11:34 AM
You apply current, you get the same current out which you can use, minus some losses. But you will also get the magnetic field. You did not apply any magnetic field in the wire, it comes as a side product of moving charge. If your current is DC you get electromagnet, if it is AC you can use it for power transfer via induction (fluctuating magnetic field). But you should know this so lets not distract this thread further.
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: TinselKoala on May 03, 2013, 02:26:54 PM
There is a difference between the "steady state" condition (tops and bottoms of pulses, or near the sine wave peaks) and what is happening at the edges, when the magnetic field caused by the moving charges is building and collapsing. The field building stores energy, the field collapsing returns this energy. When you open a switch in an inductive circuit, the field collapsing makes the current "want" to continue in the same direction across the switch, delaying the circuit's "turn off" time. This is the magnetic field's stored energy being returned to the circuit as the field collapses. We are all familiar with this. Less appreciated is the reverse process: when you close the switch in an inductive circuit, there is a delay in the current reaching its full value. This is because the magnetic field takes energy to set up. Speed the process up by sending a pulse train or an AC signal to the coil and you see a phase delay between applied voltage and current in the system.
Title: Re: Does the BiTT transformer of Thane Heins have those limitations ???
Post by: poynt99 on May 03, 2013, 02:33:22 PM
You apply current, you get the same current out which you can use, minus some losses. But you will also get the magnetic field. You did not apply any magnetic field in the wire, it comes as a side product of moving charge. If your current is DC you get electromagnet, if it is AC you can use it for power transfer via induction (fluctuating magnetic field). But you should know this so lets not distract this thread further.
The magnetic field is set up as a consequence of applying a current. The magnetic field most certainly did not come "free".