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Author Topic: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions  (Read 371711 times)

Offline aleks

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #390 on: May 21, 2008, 02:52:07 PM »
Pulse supply at 24V. Square wave (under 10ns rise and fall times) from 1KHz - 4 MHz.
Well, it should not work. I've spoken this idea a lot of times on many threads here on OU. You have to use discharges or low duty-cycle square wave. Pure square wave won't work since it is symmetrical. Not to say you are likely not producing enough current with square wave generator. 24V at how much amperes? Avalanche MOSFET pulses should be used, or capacitor discharges. Anything "interesting" was produced with these two only (plus spark gap). I have not seen any good reports with square wave gens: their transients are counter-acting each other thus nullifying overunity energy. Well, low duty-cycle square wave may not work as well: it is still a pulse with symmetrical transients.

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Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #391 on: May 21, 2008, 03:11:04 PM »
sorry - I assumed a lot in my post ...

15% duty cycle pulses and pulse duty cycles down to 1% also tested. No difference. All pulses are extreemly low impedance - ceramic bypass caps are right on the main power supply. Even at low duty cycle the large diameter graphite gets quite warm. All pulses are biased 0 - +ve -- not symetrical around ground.

The switcher is set up to handle 550V at 35A pulses - ceramic caps on the supply are backed up with pulse cap (2KV at 100's amp continuous use - KA's for short bursts). My HV supply is under reconstruction at present which is why the HV pulse tests have not been done -- plus it is prudent to do the 24V tests first to asses the ammount of heating and any other problems that might arise when pulsing with a lot of power.

Offline aleks

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #392 on: May 21, 2008, 03:15:55 PM »
15% duty cycle pulses and pulse duty cycles down to 1% also tested. No difference.
I've added a comment to my post above - varying duty cycle may not work as well. It still has symmetrical transients. Transients should be non-symmetrical like discharges (spark gap) or saw-tooth waves. I'm not talking about DC symmetry. I'm talking about transient (delta) symmetry. With square wave you have +2.4V/nanosecond transient then -2.4V/ns transient, etc. With discharges you have +2.4V/ns transient and then a -0.01V/ns transient.

Low-passed square wave won't work for the same reason: even though it does look like a discharge, its every other high transient negates previous high transient. It may work, but I'm not sure.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2008, 03:46:31 PM by aleks »

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #392 on: May 21, 2008, 03:15:55 PM »
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Offline Koen1

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #393 on: May 21, 2008, 03:33:44 PM »
It even did it when the end of the fricking diode lead was just sticking up in the air, not touching anything.

when I say there was NO voltage across the diode, there was NO voltage across the diode. I checked and re-checked it three times since I posted the photo originally.

No continuity in the circuit until the switch is closed, resistance of circuit is 980 or so ohms. 989. fluctuates a little bit due to el-crapo 3 dollar meter.

NO voltage across diode.
Well that's a bit weird, I would really have expected some voltage...  :-\

Quote
Diode also checks out as good with built in diode tester.

No clue what's going on.

Also, not sure how 9mW would warm my hand unless it was beta that was being focused by C shaped aluminum housing.
Yes, that's exactly what I was thinking... So there does seem to be quite a bit of beta coming off it, but it doesn't show up
on the diode as voltage?
Well knock me down and call me timber... What the flippin flip is going on there?

Quote
Checked continuity between all parts of circuit (resistor, diode (when free standing), circuit board contacts, power, ground, and switch terminals) and the aluminum shield.

NO continuity. Shield is floating electrically, and sits only on insulated PC board. on other side of board is a patch of epoxy that was holding on battery clip from a previous project. recycled PC board. no shorts anywhere on board, since I used a previously unused section of the PC board. Its a DIP breakout board from radio shack.

hmm... what if you hook the aluminium collector to the diode to a cap, and the other cap terminal to a diode to the carbon again? If you're not getting any
volts from the aluminium collector now, you're probably not going to get them then either... idk...

Quote
Totally weird crap, and I'm going to sleep.
Lol well you've given it a good shot. :)


Quote
just some tape, magnets on the resistor, and a diode, and a piece of aluminum foil near the diode. No clue. Try it. Burn your finger.

Join the club!

Rofl :D Burn your finger, join the club! lolz

Offline Feynman

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #394 on: May 21, 2008, 04:13:14 PM »
Nice tests R, you are the McGuiver of EE;  sorry to those who couldn't get the effect yet. Remember use a nice strong magnet bias and try a higher ampere / higher voltage discharge.  See if you pick up anything on your counter.  Put your counter close, and remember your magnets may be causing the beta to curve into some sort of stream.  . . So check around your device at different angles for the presence of beta.  If you still cannot get an effect, post a photo of your setup and maybe  we can figure out what to modify.

My counter is on the way, my setup will be DC pulsed square wave (at variable frequency 1khz and up) into 12mm long carbon rod at  200-500V+ 0.25A-5A, or else around 48V at 30A. I will try both and measure beta output with the geiger. I can also try single-shot 200-1000V at 10uF as well, but this capacitor has not arrived yet.  I will be using 30+lb  N45 neos to bias the rod both axially and anti-axially depending on the particular experiment. 

I will check all configurations against control for beta electrons.  Supposing I can confirm presence of beta in my replication, I will then attempt collection.  If you are trying replication , please do not claim "it doesn't work" unless you are actually scoping for the beta electrons with a working counter and can't find any.  If you cannot find them with the counter, please post a photograph of your setup.  Thanks!


@Koen

I saw your idea, I like it, but I am really bad at LC circuits.  Perhaps you should message groundloop and zerotensor, I think they both were discussing using variations of these... sorry at work will try to read it more carefully this afternoon.

@Mark
Can you post a photo?

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #394 on: May 21, 2008, 04:13:14 PM »
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Offline Earl

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #395 on: May 21, 2008, 04:35:06 PM »
@ R McGuiver

1- Try turning the diode upside down and repeat test.
2- Replace with second diode  and repeat test.
3- Turn second diode upside down and repeat test.
4- Replace with LED  and repeat test.
5- Turn LED upside down and repeat test.

What are the results of these 5 tests?

Earl

Offline xee

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #396 on: May 21, 2008, 04:35:45 PM »
@Inventor81 ,
Did you try reversing the polarity of the diode? Since there is no voltage across it, I assume the results will be the same. Perhaps heat comes from diode lead connected to ground. This could be checked by replacing diode with just a lead that is only connected to ground. Your results are certainly impressive, just hard to understand. Your experiment seems like the kind of test that leads to major new discoveries. Great work.

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #396 on: May 21, 2008, 04:35:45 PM »
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Offline DrSimon

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #397 on: May 21, 2008, 04:48:01 PM »
*Group
I wanted to find out if the heat in the diode was coming from conduction of the leads or a combination of this and the focus of heat from the small resistor at +/-10mW so I performed the following test using a UF4007. Crude yes but it did offer some information. The resistor is a Carbon Composition 2W +/-10%. The mags are in a small Styrofoam collar around the resistor. The connections can be seen in the picture.

What I found was a very slight increase in resistor heat (to be expected) remember it is a two watt unit. The test was run for four (4) minutes for five runs. The resistor was allowed to cool back to ambient temperature before each run was started. What was observed was an increase of +0.8C in the resistor and a -0.3C in the diode. The diode reading is well within the measurement error and I am sure it did not cool. So unless I am really doing it wrong it does not seem to work for me at this time. The voltage was indeed 9V and the diode connected to the ground or negative supply lead.

&&Edit: I forgot to say that there was NO detectable Beta above background. This was check with two very good instruments.


Offline allcanadian

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #398 on: May 21, 2008, 05:16:07 PM »
Here is something you may want to consider, a quote by Henry Moray.
Quote
When an elastic substance is subjected to strain and then set free, one of two things happen. The substance may slowly recover from the strain and gradually attain its natural state or the elastic recoil may carry it past its position of equilibrium and beyond, and cause it to execute a series of oscillations. In other words, there may be a continuous flow of energy in one direction until the discharge is completed or an oscillating discharge may occur, That is, the first flow may be succeeded by a backrush and succeeding backrushes, the oscillations going on until the energy is either radiated or used up in the energizing of the conductors

Now consider what you are doing, discharging a defined amount of energy in a capacitor in an infinately small period of time through a short conductor. This energy in the "carbon" conductor could radiate, it could heat the conductor or it could with the help of the capacitance display the properties of elastic recoil and oscillate. What is seldom considered is that the "rate of change" can be more important than the circuit potential and current flow and that a "single" impulse is always resonant with the circuit it is applied to while a forced oscillation may not be. I think it is very likely this is what is happening, the impulse from the capacitors through the conductor radiates a field at 90 degrees from the conductor and expells the permanent magnetic field from the secondary windings on the core. As well the carbon rod and capacitors form a super low resistance LC circuit which could oscillate at ultra high frequencies and could easily account for the "beta radiation". It is also interesting to note that Tesla is well known for his experiments with massive capacitor discharges through short conductors producing what he and others called "radiant energy" as energy is radiated from the conductor. This technology is very neat as we are not necessarily dealing only with conductors any more, we are producing fields which have unique properties determined by there frequency and potential. Yesterday I charged a 2200uF capacitor to 20v in two seconds using a single wire, the single conductor was 10 feet long and connected to one of Dr.Stifflers SEC oscillators, from the Dr.Stiffler thread. This is a good example of the misunderstanding we have have concerning field energy as most qualified people would tell me what I have done --cannot be done.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #398 on: May 21, 2008, 05:16:07 PM »
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Offline UncleFester

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #399 on: May 21, 2008, 05:29:20 PM »
Not enough capacitance for low voltage run = Not enough current. Has anyone read what Juan said? His statements coincide with data already collected. At 12 volts you need hundreds of amperes of discharge across the rod. The formula is there, you just need to read it.

On a different note, the carbon rod does get hot.....something that will have to be dealt with later.....

Please go back and re-read what Dave posted from Juan, there is no need to re-invent the wheel.

Offline UncleFester

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #400 on: May 21, 2008, 05:37:20 PM »
Wavez,
do you think you can  pump 300 amp pulses
through this pretty thin wire ?
Okay, if you just make them very short maybe...

Better use bigger diameter wire.
Any video or pictures yet available from Uncle Fester and Dr.T ?
Would like to see your selfrunning devices.
Maybe you can go to your neighbour and ask
him to loan his handyphone with integrated camera and
make at least a few pics, if you own camera broke.

You could do this when it is not running,
so you might not fry your neighbours mobile phone....

Many thanks.
Regards, Stefan.

Lol! I have a new camera coming by Thursday and will have video and images.

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #400 on: May 21, 2008, 05:37:20 PM »
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Offline Feynman

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #401 on: May 21, 2008, 05:44:12 PM »
@DrSimon

Hello DrSimon.  Thank you for attempting to scope R's device for beta.  That is unfortunate you were unable to replicate what R tried. Maybe there is something that was done differently.

 Perhaps it will be more fruitful to try a nice voltage/discharge into a magnetically biased carbon rod, and see if that produces beta?  We need discharge voltages 48V-1000V+ (not 12V ;) ), with amps somewhat depending on voltage. This was the original setup as discovered, both by JL Naudin, Juan, Unclefester, and others. Remember it is not just one person who has produced beta, JLN has as well and I have posted an experimental photograph below.  Hopefully I will be able to do this myself by the experiment by the of the week.  I am waiting to do this right so I do not court uncessesary frustration and some of my parts are still on the way.

JLN proof of higher beta production with B-field
(http://jlnlabs.online.fr/vsg/vsgv41e.jpg)

JLN 'fat tail' beta production
(http://jlnlabs.online.fr/vsg/radrecord.gif)

source: http://jlnlabs.online.fr/vsg/vsg41.htm


@unclefester
Keep on rocking in the free world!

@allcanadian
Thank you for your thoughts and for the Moray quote. One trick may be to experiment with 'rise time' in an experimental setup which is generating beta.   Another trick may be to use different methods of discharge in order to cause the most rapid current saturation possible without too much heating.

Offline Inventor81

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Mother_F!!!!ing piece of 54!7
« Reply #402 on: May 21, 2008, 06:22:33 PM »
I'm never staying up until 4AM for anything.


EVER.

Unless it's a lunar eclipse or a once in a lifetime astronomical event.

I was using small gauge wire, about the same gauge as the wires in a ribbon cable.

Stranded wire.

basically ten or fifteen strands of 30-ish gauge wire in a bundle in some insulation.

I soldered my hookups, and apparently there was one strand.

ONE MOTHER F)(KING G()D D_MNED STRAND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It shorted intermittently to the frigging aluminum shield.

Results a fluke.

forcnig the short, i found .88 volts across the diode.

.88V

I'm about as pissed as all get out.

Called Fester at 5 to report results.

Posted here and wasted everyone's time and resources.

WTF.

I'm going out to the forge to beat the shit out of something hard and metallic. I may wind up with a new toroid core, or I might just wind up with some high carbon steel foil.

Either way, I won't be so pissed afterwards.

Cheers.

Offline Inventor81

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #403 on: May 21, 2008, 06:32:58 PM »
To eliminate the possibility of a current transformer effect - think of AC clamp meters - put the clamp around a wire, and measure voltage/current... its a toroid with a hinge... just like what we've got...


Run your carbon rod through the toroid, but bring your ground and power leads out the same face of the toroid. Like in my setup with the resistor mounted vertically... the power and ground leads are anti-parallel, so that any induced field in the toroid (which I did not have on the setup with the shielding in place in the photo) resulting from one lead would be canceled by the opposing lead.

Someone who has beta results, please replicate this setup so that there is no chance of skewing the results. What we need now are accurate numbers.

Actually, that's what I need. I'm moving back to theoretician.

If someone gets good results, please post a schematic and parts list, and I will simply follow those reccomendations. This is obviously not a low voltage effect.

At least, I've partially verified my own *fing* calculations regarding the threshold voltage being between 100 and 300V. 37V pulses seem to do it, but scads better results at 100V.

Well, as long as you've got shielding it's better...lol.

Annnyhow... I really feel like a complete dumbass right now, so again, headed out to the forge unless something super awesome comes up.

Also, thanks for the replication. Even though I'm a dumbass, at least it didn't cost too much to toss a diode in there.

Frick.

R3CuR51<3

Offline MarkSnoswell

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #404 on: May 21, 2008, 06:43:26 PM »
To eliminate the possibility of a current transformer effect - ...Run your carbon rod through the toroid, but bring your ground and power leads out the same face of the toroid. Like in my setup with the resistor mounted vertically... the power and ground leads are anti-parallel, so that any induced field in the toroid (which I did not have on the setup with the shielding in place in the photo) resulting from one lead would be canceled by the opposing lead.


yes -- very good suggestion. (he says kicking himself for not making it) In fact it would be good to get outputs from all experimenters with through and canceling current loop configurations.

cheers

 

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