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Author Topic: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions  (Read 371709 times)

Offline AbbaRue

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #675 on: June 02, 2008, 05:27:23 AM »
I am  hoping that the capacitor bank is only needed for startup. 
Then part of the output is fed back into the rod to keep the unit going.
Using one pulse at a time also makes it possible to test different pulse lengths,
to see what pulse length produces the best output level. 
Unless the capacitor bank is large enough it is unlikely that it could keep a steady pulse train going.
These are my reasons for using a single pulse unit. 
Anyone wanting a pulse train could just use a  standard 555 timer output.
It would be quite easy to use the output of a 555 timer to trigger this circuit if needed.
Just replace the push button with a transistor switch controlled by the 555 timer. 
There are plenty of pulse train generators to be found, what`s hard to find is a circuit that
puts out a single pulse at a set pulse width.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #675 on: June 02, 2008, 05:27:23 AM »

Offline UncleFester

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #676 on: June 02, 2008, 06:22:57 AM »
I am  hoping that the capacitor bank is only needed for startup. 
Then part of the output is fed back into the rod to keep the unit going.
Using one pulse at a time also makes it possible to test different pulse lengths,
to see what pulse length produces the best output level. 
Unless the capacitor bank is large enough it is unlikely that it could keep a steady pulse train going.
These are my reasons for using a single pulse unit. 
Anyone wanting a pulse train could just use a  standard 555 timer output.
It would be quite easy to use the output of a 555 timer to trigger this circuit if needed.
Just replace the push button with a transistor switch controlled by the 555 timer. 
There are plenty of pulse train generators to be found, what`s hard to find is a circuit that
puts out a single pulse at a set pulse width.

The issue is not setting up a single pulse, this has already been done. The required input according to Juan is 109-110 joules. This entire charge is discharged across the carbon rod at a steady pulse rate (in this case 50 or 60Hz depending on the frequency of AC required). This requires large transistors in the 500 volt @ 100 to 300 ampere range with large heatsinks. If you want to do the single pulse setup just use a momentary switch to fire the 555 and thus fire the gates of IGBT or Mosfet. Of course alignment field is needed as well which can be run from the same 555 output to run the gate of a separate transistor running the alignment field coil....

Offline AbbaRue

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #677 on: June 02, 2008, 08:36:37 PM »
@UncleFester
But in the case of your run away events, if the voltage was controlled
the circuit would established it's own frequency based on
the time between feedback pulses.
Then by modifying the circuit one could get the frequency they're looking for.

Your trying to use the capacitors to run the unit, I'm trying to get it to run itself.
In my case the capacitor bank is only used once and then everything runs itself.
No need for high voltage caps or transistors.
You said the unit kept increasing in voltage as it ran.
I am hoping a 50v pulse can start the unit and then it will keep increasing in voltage
until the ideal operating voltage is achieved say 220 Volts.
Then the unit is allowed to run on it's own at that voltage
I can see how the unit could be fired up using a battery bank instead of a capacitor bank.
4 car batteries in series should supply enough voltage and current to start the unit.
Thus it would be quite easy to run a car with this setup. 
In fact running a car with it would be easier then running a house,
because in a house you have to deal with times when little power is needed.
In a car you fire up the unit when you start driving and turn it off when you stop.

This is the direction I'm working on and it was sparked by your report of getting a run away voltage twice.
I thought you would continue along those lines too. 
A varistor across the output may be enough to keep things under control,
and maintain a steady output at the desired voltage. 
Maintaining 50/60 Hz may be a problem, but if the output is rectified it wouldn't matter.
The DC could be inverted to get 50/60 Hz if that's what one wants.

If you want to use the capacitor discharge concept, maybe car batteries in series is the way to go instead of capacitors.
Capacitors take time to recharge, very difficult trying to charge them up in 1/100 S.
Batteries have the current right there as you need it. 
Car batteries should handle 700 A. output pulses quite easily.
Once the unit is running it can recharge the batteries as well as maintain itself.

So we have 2 different routes we can go and both should work.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #677 on: June 02, 2008, 08:36:37 PM »
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Offline AbbaRue

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #678 on: June 02, 2008, 08:54:01 PM »
I should mention the main reason for using pulses of a controlled time.
As a capacitor discharges the voltage keeps dropping.
I believe the lower voltage is undesired, because it only produce heat in the rod.
I believe we need a short strong pulse, as short as possible to produce the reaction.
Also will make charging the caps up again take less time. 

My understanding is based on the concepts of pulsed lasers.
I see this as a sort of "Beta Laser" that uses magnets instead of mirrors.
And maybe that is what is really is?

Offline Elisha

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #679 on: June 03, 2008, 04:40:43 AM »
This is the equipment needed for make the testing. (my opinion best functionality at lower price)

First the oscilloscope, VELLEMAN PCSU1000 USB,  299$ in internet, kitsusa.us and other sites same price.

(http://byfiles.storage.live.com/y1purUX2YnQ61U-HYYmk9fhqsV3yJSPPCfGSxO4Lx5Am09qcbEMWLwQHZyEIDiGJr9MMFbRcTsZRzM)
(http://byfiles.storage.live.com/y1purUX2YnQ61XyaH9v4r-b_JcvY8AP780xW5C5QRCqWMnFZSH5cFH1cZqKfvDeAmqP2ClwY3_Lye4)

Second the function generator, VELLEMAN PCGU1000 2MHz USB, 189$ in internet.

(http://byfiles.storage.live.com/y1purUX2YnQ61U-HYYmk9fhqsV3yJSPPCfGSxO4Lx5Am09qcbEMWLwQHZyEIDiGJr9MMFbRcTsZRzM)
(http://byfiles.storage.live.com/y1purUX2YnQ61VI1UWmqKs6YbgL3ymIBBSJ1yL4uba0C7-wa44_tXEoJzAZ5M8pEhVLtRqSSHUUYZU)
(http://byfiles.storage.live.com/y1purUX2YnQ61WOevRoWaT32y9g_xQNHIq-WITLUlxB6o6VU16-HhyVMUJ-xc2QJaeJ14dUoMplGLI)

Third the power source, MASTECH HY3005F-3 Triple DC Power Supply Dual Colour Dispalys, 189$ in internet
(http://byfiles.storage.live.com/y1purUX2YnQ61WD-1xQO-JQPpaspCOdSCh7_qGlfUnuiqGlCdXtcxvqhrQhA4WnpbVsK2_hEWSwHWg)

Total bugget until now, 680 $

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #679 on: June 03, 2008, 04:40:43 AM »
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Offline zerotensor

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #680 on: June 03, 2008, 07:26:34 AM »
This is the equipment needed for make the testing. (my opinion best functionality at lower price)

...

Total bugget until now, 680 $

*druel*

Um, anybody have 700 bucks they can give me?  I'll do some really good tests-- I promise!

But really, one of the things about this system is that you really don't need all that fancy equipment to do these experiments ('though it would be sweet).  Here's my shopping list:

Carbon electrodes:  $2, internet
SCR, transistors, etc:  ~$50, Digikey or wherever.
Everything else:  $0, dumpster-dive / scavenge.

While I admit that nice f'n gens and scopes would make the design / testing process easier, one should be able to build the device for under $100.

Showing OU would be as easy as closing the loop and running a load without an external power supply.

(I know, easier said than done...)

Offline AbbaRue

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #681 on: June 03, 2008, 07:42:51 AM »
In my hurry to get to work earlier, I forgot to mention one very important point.
To have a self running unit I want to turn the mosfets off as soon as possible so the
feedback pulse from the toroid doesn't get shorted out across the discharged capacitor bank.
I want the whole pulse current entering the carbon rod.

Time to do some testing now, and hopefully the next time I post on this forum I will have some test results to share.
So it might be a few days till you hear from me again.

@Elisha
Good stuff, I was considering getting one of those USB port oscilloscopes myself at one time.
I could use it now. 

Till later happy experimenting, Harold.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #681 on: June 03, 2008, 07:42:51 AM »
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Offline Elisha

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #682 on: June 05, 2008, 04:51:43 PM »
The oscilloscope is to make a more formal, more scientific approach, if this circuit work for overunity then we need to duplicate the circuit for validate, this is essence of the scientific method.

If someone find something then someone else must to corroborate the result. That is the scientific way.

We need the oscilloscope, we need to make multiple test, and fill tables and graphics with the test data.

We have to get organization in our investigation, the money is limited, the time is limited.

If someone have a working overunity circuit please post a photo, describe the circuit, explain the test.

The single shoot circuit is the better first step, we can test the voltage for the caps, the position of the toroid for best alignment field, the size of the carbon rod, the position of the neomagnet.

Then we can work in the self running circuit.  This baby need first learn to walk then run.

@Abbarue
I also thing that is something like the pulsed laser

The battery have the lot of amper needed, but I think that dont work in the speed of discharge needed, the capacitor also have speed of discharge.

@allcanadian
Please post some photos of your circuit.
@UncleFester
Please post some photos of your circuit.

Offline k4zep

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #683 on: June 05, 2008, 08:14:55 PM »
The issue is not setting up a single pulse, this has already been done. The required input according to Juan is 109-110 joules. This entire charge is discharged across the carbon rod at a steady pulse rate (in this case 50 or 60Hz depending on the frequency of AC required). This requires large transistors in the 500 volt @ 100 to 300 ampere range with large heatsinks. If you want to do the single pulse setup just use a momentary switch to fire the 555 and thus fire the gates of IGBT or Mosfet. Of course alignment field is needed as well which can be run from the same 555 output to run the gate of a separate transistor running the alignment field coil....

Hi Uncle Fester,

Several folk have been watching this thread and there is serious testing going on off this list.  No sense talking about it unless absolutely positive results.  I personally would not mind a hand drawn schematic from you, saves time and effort and gets the point across very fast.  My friends and I have all the equipment to build/test this device. 

From what I see so far, the engineering mountains to overcome are pulse current into and then current out of the device.  I so far have EMR pulse problems that really mucks with solid state instruments.  Shorts in the Toroid due to flash over when rod fires, HV supply Caps. that break down in a rapid fire pulse mode. High voltage/current IGBT's that roll over and die on command.   It's not as easy as it would first appear to be. 

Can you use a high current bidirectional sine wave through the rod/reactor or do you find that there is a need for a rapid rise time mono polarity pulse in the rod for maximum output? 


Respectfully
Ben K4ZEP

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #683 on: June 05, 2008, 08:14:55 PM »
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Offline twosox

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #684 on: June 06, 2008, 12:19:26 AM »
phew, read that post just in time, components placed on the board and my soldering iron was about to get plugged in.  :o

ordered a sack load of 555's today just on the off chance a suitable circuit popped up, thanks Abbarue,
is your circuit on veroboard, breadboard or have you etched your own?

Offline Elisha

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #685 on: June 06, 2008, 01:49:03 AM »
@Abbarue

Excellent circuit drawing, but I don?t understand the resistor in the Gate of the MOSFET, is like a Shielding resistor?, because a 10 ohm resistor to ground is like ground, and 2 ohm resistor to ground is like ground.  Please explain what is this.

Also please send me the original file of circuit.

@k4zep
someone before say that a crystal like in the fish cage will stop the radiation from the carbon rod, this idea will also work for the EMF, just the carbon rod and the toroid coil need to be in the cage, the rest of the circuit will be out of the cage.

@UncleFester
Take your time, draw your circuit, document it, when you make a lot of test you can forget something that to make before.  Is not a hurry time, is the time to make all properly.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #685 on: June 06, 2008, 01:49:03 AM »
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Offline k4zep

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #686 on: June 06, 2008, 05:49:19 AM »
I had problems with the 3 transistor pulse circuit, switch bounce caused multiple pulses.
So now I am using the following 555 based circuit, and it works quite well.
(http://)

Circuit won't work as drawn.  Drive dividing resistors are drawn wrong.  You can't pull up the ground to drive the switch.You might want to post a corrected schematic.

Ben K4ZEP

Offline AbbaRue

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #687 on: June 06, 2008, 07:22:36 AM »
Sorry about that Elisha:  I was in a hurry and made an error.
Here is the proper circuit diagram.
Both the 10 ohm and the 2 ohm can be experimented with.  You could even use a 100 ohm and a 1 ohm.
The main concern is to keep the mosfet turned off by keeping the gate as close to grounded as possible.
Of course connecting it completely to ground will prevent the transistor pulse from turning it on. 
Perhaps Stefan can remove the other diagram to prevent confusion for anyone trying to build it.
(http://)

Offline bluedemon

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #688 on: June 09, 2008, 02:09:26 PM »
http://esciencenews.com/articles/2008/06/08/surprising.graphene

"The familiar pencil-lead form of carbon, graphite, consists of layers of carbon atoms tightly bonded in the plane but only loosely bonded between planes; because the layers move easily over one another, graphite is a good lubricant. In fact these graphite layers are graphene, although they had never been observed in isolation before 2004"

"One interesting consequence of this unique band structure is that the electrons in graphene are "sort of free," Li says. Unlike electrons in other materials, the electrons in graphene move ballistically -- without collisions -- over great distances, even at room temperature. As a result, the ability of the electrons in graphene to conduct electrical current is 10 to 100 times greater than those in a normal semiconductor like silicon at room temperature. This makes graphene a very promising candidate for future electronic applications.

Says Li, "By applying a gate voltage to graphene which has been integrated in a gated device, one can continually control the carrier density by varying the voltage, and thus the conductivity." It's this phenomenon that gives rise to graphene's practical promise."

Offline twosox

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #689 on: June 10, 2008, 05:05:01 PM »
@BEP

quote : Now, if I can just find a carbon rod 5 inches long and 6 inches in diameter I could make use of an earlier project.


how does this grab you :-)

http://www.graphitestore.com/itemDetails.asp?item_id=3338&prd_id=26&cat_id=22&curPage=3

lol, expensive though.  ;D

 

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