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Author Topic: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions  (Read 377649 times)

Offline eldarion

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #720 on: June 21, 2008, 03:53:40 AM »
@UncleFester,

I think I may also have the wrong kind of carbon, and it came from a battery as well. ;)

What is the approximate resistance of your rod?  Mine is less than 0.2 ohms.

@K4ZEP,

For my setup I simply bought a solid aluminium rod from Home Depot and drilled out a hole ever so slightly larger than the rod.  I also drilled and tapped a couple holes in the side for securing the rod and one hole in the end for a terminal--this gave me a junction resistance far less than 0.1 ohms.

Thanks!

Eldarion

Offline k4zep

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #721 on: June 21, 2008, 05:12:51 AM »
@UncleFester,

I think I may also have the wrong kind of carbon, and it came from a battery as well. ;)

What is the approximate resistance of your rod?  Mine is less than 0.2 ohms.

@K4ZEP,

For my setup I simply bought a solid aluminium rod from Home Depot and drilled out a hole ever so slightly larger than the rod.  I also drilled and tapped a couple holes in the side for securing the rod and one hole in the end for a terminal--this gave me a junction resistance far less than 0.1 ohms.

Thanks!

Eldarion

Eldarion,

Mine also was less that .1 ohm, unable to measure.   Uncle fester says his is about 1.8 ohms.  That is why I have ordered new rods from source suggested by him.

Good idea on the termination, will do, probably in brass.

Ben

Offline UncleFester

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #722 on: June 21, 2008, 05:25:04 AM »
Eldarion,

Mine also was less that .1 ohm, unable to measure.   Uncle fester says his is about 1.8 ohms.  That is why I have ordered new rods from source suggested by him.

Good idea on the termination, will do, probably in brass.

Ben

Must have lots of impurities in it. Probably Ti and other minerals. Even my 1/2" rod was .8 ohm, so you guys need different rod I think. Both rods I have claim to be 99.95 percent pure, but there are lesser grades that have up to 200ppm of other minerals. I will show you what I did for connecting to the carbon. I machined 5/8" aluminum rod into a sleeve that has set screws on each end and one end is thread with 5/16-18 for a bolt to bolt the #6 welding cable (600V max on insulation) to the ends.

Lemme see if I can make a quick video to show some of the details.

VSG setup video here
« Last Edit: June 21, 2008, 06:19:56 AM by UncleFester »

Offline callanan

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #723 on: June 21, 2008, 07:43:28 AM »
UncleFester,

Thanks for the video! There are more people working on this then maybe realized. Every little bit of practical info helps. The theory is a good and sound theory worth exploration and replication. But as Ben has pointed out, the difficulty is in getting the minimum required amount of energy, to cause a reaction, into the rod. The rod itself and it's low resistance poses the first problem. This is why different types of rods with different resistances will change the result.

The link to your video didn't work for me, so I am posting the URL. I hope you don't mind.

http://tinypic.com/player.php?v=67pqwl&s=3

Regards,

Ossie


Offline eldarion

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #724 on: June 21, 2008, 08:15:04 AM »
I am still having a problem with the 109 joule requirement for this reason:
Assume a 60Hz output.  This will require the capacitors to dump 109 joules into the carbon rod each second if I understand correctly.  This works out to 6540Kw going in to the carbon rod. :o

Am I missing something here?  Does this particular joule requirement only hold for single pulse mode, and maybe what is meant is actually 109 watts minimum into the rod?

UncleFester, with your old selfrunner, how many watts would you guess you were dumping through the rod?

I notice we independently came up with the exact same carbon rod electrodes. ;D

Eldarion

Offline k4zep

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #725 on: June 21, 2008, 02:21:30 PM »
Must have lots of impurities in it. Probably Ti and other minerals. Even my 1/2" rod was .8 ohm, so you guys need different rod I think. Both rods I have claim to be 99.95 percent pure, but there are lesser grades that have up to 200ppm of other minerals. I will show you what I did for connecting to the carbon. I machined 5/8" aluminum rod into a sleeve that has set screws on each end and one end is thread with 5/16-18 for a bolt to bolt the #6 welding cable (600V max on insulation) to the ends.

Lemme see if I can make a quick video to show some of the details.

VSG setup video here

Good Morning Uncle Fester,

Just watched your video.  Most excellent.....as they say, a picture is worth a million words.  I applaud the amount of work you have put into your project!  KEEP it up...... 

Just sitting here circling the wagons now till parts come in.!  You obviously have been working on this for a while, can you shed any words of wisdom on what you found as to the requirements of the duration of the input pulse time wise, vs. the time of the output pulse when a reaction occurs?  As Eldarion below has noted if you put 109J into rod/sec......a hell of a lot of power in the rod so it would seem there is a short duty cycle or a lot of smoke!

Ben

Ben

Offline UncleFester

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #726 on: June 21, 2008, 06:46:42 PM »
@Ossie

Thanks for fixing the url. More work to be done this weekend, but I am close to firing it again.

@Eldarion

High kilowatt pulse only happens for about 200uS, so we wait for 16.55mS before we fire again. Now, we have 8.275 200uS pulses within a 16.55mS timespan, this leaves us with 790 watts average per full cycle, even a small 1500 watt inverter should handle this power requirement temporarily until we have enough power to self run. If you see on your scope that the pulse is dragging out into 500uS or more then you need a different cap that will discharge faster. On the first firing we should have the energy available to loop power back to input and now we have a self runner. It only takes one pulse to see if we have enough energy to self run, just as Juan say's. He loops the system after the first pulse. small self runner was 2000VDC @ .68uF per pulse, measures out to 6 watts continuous.

@k4zep

See above = )

Offline AbbaRue

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #727 on: June 21, 2008, 06:57:56 PM »
This is very interesting data.  Where are you getting the info from Juan? Is it another website?
For a high resistance carbon source has anyone tried using coal cut into rods?
I remember reading that Vallee used coal in his experiments.

I have been using 10mS pulses, so I need to greatly reduce the time.
Also the shorter the pulse width the more current the mosfets can handle.
I'm using 10x150V 40A mosfets. With 60V caps. I may be to low a voltage but I hope not.

My main question now is the toroid. How close to the rod should the inside be?
My toroid has an inside dia. of 28mm and is 25mm wide. It has 4 different windings on it.
I bought it this way. What ratio of windings should we be using.
The rod would count as one winding, so do we use 2 or 3 windings of very thick wire for the collection winding?
 

Offline UncleFester

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #728 on: June 21, 2008, 07:09:26 PM »
This is very interesting data.  Where are you getting the info from Juan? Is it another website?
For a high resistance carbon source has anyone tried using coal cut into rods?
I remember reading that Vallee used coal in his experiments.


Earlier in this thread Juan's info was posted. All details were covered. Enough info to not only replicate but even build a commercial unit (assuming the data is not false). But Juan appears to know too much detailed info for it to be false, even the formula for capacitance, and the resistance of the rod he uses 1.8ohm, it goes on, he knows more than just a bystander.

A schematic was given out off the list to someone as well, but the information already given is all that is needed.

Offline k4zep

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #729 on: June 21, 2008, 07:15:30 PM »
@Ossie

Thanks for fixing the url. More work to be done this weekend, but I am close to firing it again.

@Eldarion

High kilowatt pulse only happens for about 200uS, so we wait for 16.55mS before we fire again. Now, we have 8.275 200uS pulses within a 16.55mS timespan, this leaves us with 790 watts average per full cycle, even a small 1500 watt inverter should handle this power requirement temporarily until we have enough power to self run. If you see on your scope that the pulse is dragging out into 500uS or more then you need a different cap that will discharge faster. On the first firing we should have the energy available to loop power back to input and now we have a self runner. It only takes one pulse to see if we have enough energy to self run, just as Juan say's. He loops the system after the first pulse. small self runner was 2000VDC @ .68uF per pulse, measures out to 6 watts continuous.

@k4zep

See above = )

Hi Uncle Fester,

Understand the numbers above but slightly confused as to some values.  If  2000VDC @ .68uf will excite a rod, (I have everything to duplicate this level right now except for carbon)  why have we been so hung up on the high value 108J per pulse except for high power output.  It would now appear that under the right conditions, there is a wide window of excitation and output!  It also appears that the pulse need never be longer than 200us (and can be MUCH shorter!) and the conditions such as rep. rate, etc are totally dependent on voltage/resistance, etc. in the loop!  What a rich area for R&D!  Darn it, I need my carbon.

My good friend Ossie has also put me on to the idea of using a Xenon strobe tube which is virtually indestructible to fire this sucker!
Right on Ossie.

Ben


Offline AbbaRue

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #730 on: June 21, 2008, 07:20:57 PM »
What kind of tube is used? I don't think a regular Xenon tube could handle the current.

The info I was refering to is this statement.
"Juan say's. He loops the system after the first pulse. small self runner was 2000VDC @ .68uF per pulse"
I don't remember reading that, I must have missed it.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2008, 07:42:29 PM by AbbaRue »

Offline eldarion

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #731 on: June 21, 2008, 07:43:19 PM »
Hi Uncle Fester,

Understand the numbers above but slightly confused as to some values.  If  2000VDC @ .68uf will excite a rod, (I have everything to duplicate this level right now except for carbon)  why have we been so hung up on the high value 108J per pulse except for high power output.  It would now appear that under the right conditions, there is a wide window of excitation and output!  It also appears that the pulse need never be longer than 200us (and can be MUCH shorter!) and the conditions such as rep. rate, etc are totally dependent on voltage/resistance, etc. in the loop!  What a rich area for R&D!  Darn it, I need my carbon.

My good friend Ossie has also put me on to the idea of using a Xenon strobe tube which is virtually indestructible to fire this sucker!
Right on Ossie.

Ben



I feel the same way! :D  What I am planning to try now is a photoflash capacitor of 80uF charged to at least 175V.  Discharge that 60 times per second...

Apparently it is more important to zap the carbon with high voltage and fast impulses than it is to have a certain amount of energy.  I can go up to around 1Kv and run some tests in that region as well.

UncleFester,

In your video, how large is the toroidal transformer (I.D, O.D., and width)?  I assume it has some kind of ferrite core (designed for 60Hz operation)?

Thanks for all the information--it is greatly appreciated!

Eldarion

Offline kewlhead

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #732 on: June 21, 2008, 10:12:17 PM »
well dern, the video is gone   

Offline kewlhead

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #733 on: June 21, 2008, 11:51:54 PM »
its there sorry bout that. Thanks for sharing.  8)

Offline k4zep

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Re: Single circuits generate nuclear reactions
« Reply #734 on: June 22, 2008, 12:21:08 AM »
its there sorry bout that. Thanks for sharing.  8)
 

Hi Gang,

Found that a #2 pencil lead was good for about 2 ohms/inch.  Interesting waveform off lead.  400VDC, 1 uf fired into lead via a relay contact, lead inserted into a 70 ohm solenoid with 100 ohm load.

Pulse across lead is about 20us, normal R/C discharge curve.  Output of coil is most interesting.  Not what I expected.

You get a ragadity waveform for about 10us then a strange almost noise like burst for about 10-25us.  This is with NO magnets, just basic carbon.  This is also folded back in the solenoid so most of the input pulse is canceled out. 

Learning a bit about this beast.  Oh, I do get a very good burst on my radiation detector too.  About 200 ppm.  Picture attached is hard to see but it is there.  10us/div.

Ben