Language: 
To browser these website, it's necessary to store cookies on your computer.
The cookies contain no personal information, they are required for program control.
  the storage of cookies while browsing this website, on Login and Register.

GDPR and DSGVO law

Storing Cookies (See : http://ec.europa.eu/ipg/basics/legal/cookies/index_en.htm ) help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
https://overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please LEAVE this website now. From the 25th of May 2018, every existing user has to accept the GDPR agreement at first login. If a user is unwilling to accept the GDPR, he should email us and request to erase his account. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

User Menu

Tesla Paper

Free Energy Book

Get paid

Donations

Please Donate for the Forum.
Many thanks.
Regards, Stefan.(Admin)

A-Ads

Powerbox

Smartbox

3D Solar

3D Solar Panels

DC2DC converter

Micro JouleThief

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

CCTool

CCTool

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Products

WaterMotor kit

Statistics

  • *Total Members: 84030
  • *Latest: ggvpower

  • *Total Posts: 893768
  • *Total Topics: 15703
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 2
  • *Guests: 9
  • *Total: 11

Author Topic: Joule Lamp  (Read 299811 times)

Offline Lynxsteam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 172
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #225 on: July 06, 2012, 04:58:43 PM »
Jbignes5,

That is a different application which is why I haven't jumped on it.  If you are running different numbers of LEDs it might not work as well.  But if you parallel all LEDs it shouldn't be an issue.  Lets think, if you parallel all LEDs you need about 3.5-3.9 volts.  What voltage will you run?  Is it 12 volt?  You aren't running 120 volt bulbs like we are doing.
If this is 12 volt then you need a step down transformer.
If your primary is 90 turns and your secondary is 30 it should be fine.  The voltage spikes will be higher than 4 volts but will be absorbed by the LEDs as amps.
Look back in this thread and see the LJL Mini.  I would make something like that but use bell wire or CAT5 wire for the primary and secondary.  One layer of secondary, 30 turns, 3 layers of primary, 30 turns each.  You may also want to wind this on a Torroid or one of those snap together ferrite chokes.
Build the circuit as usual and tie the main power into your ignition switch "run" position.
Then feed the secondary output to all your light switches.  You may need to have at least a couple of LEDs running somewhere (tail-lights) all the time so the circuit is oscillating.

In modern cars the LEDs are configured in series so they run off the normal voltage.  I think they use 6 in a string for 12 volts.  Check the LED package.  Reds run on lower voltage than whites, yellows, blues....

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #225 on: July 06, 2012, 04:58:43 PM »

Offline JouleSeeker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 685
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #226 on: July 06, 2012, 06:36:56 PM »
Joule Seeker,

Thank you for doing the testing.  While some of us are after new heights in lumens/watt, I am more interested in brightness using what I gather from the solar panel.  Considering I am using and converting energy that would heat a 2' x 3' rectangle of my shingles each day, I would rather get good brightness from my circuit.  I don't mean that to be a slight.  I am very excited that with this same circuit we can get some outstanding efficacy.  But I would have been disappointed if while attaining efficiency the light given off was paltry.
One last question.  How does the "Blackberry" performance compare to total lumens using grid power?  And lumens/watt using grid power?


The light emitted is substantial, as we see by comparing the performance using grid power.
Using the grid -mains - at 120 VAC, with the same 6 corn-cob LED bulbs in the same light-box, I measure:

120VAC  3.5 W  407 lumens   116 Lm/W -- which is essentially the same Lm/W as using the LJL (both cranberry and blackberry versions reach 114 Lm/W) -- using the ferrite rods.  This suggests to me that the device is probably not OU; since the Lm/W is essentially the same with the LJL or with the grid.

 Without the ferrite rods, the Lm/W goes down, but the total lumens goes way up:
Blackberry  gives 1130 Lumens @ 12.8 V (air core), 13.2 W,  86 Lm/W. 
And at 11V,
the LJL blackberry  gives 728 Lumens @ 11 V (air core), 8.1 W,  90 Lm/W. 
Lots of Lumens, compared with the 407 lumens from the mains!

Thus, with the LJL, one can easily get VERY BRIGHT light given off.

Offline Lynxsteam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 172
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #227 on: July 06, 2012, 07:00:21 PM »
Thank you for posting this comparison.  The fact that we can run as bright as using grid power has been my quest.  That's what I was hoping for.

I didn't endeavor into this project to conquer "Over Unity".  While Joule Thief type circuits seem amazing, they are pretty simple conversions circuits.  However, this forum also goes by the name "Free Energy" and that is what we have when we take solar power and light a garage, outdoor lights, or the house.  You can use solar through a grid tie inverter, into a battery and through an inverter, or direct to 12 volt appliances.  What is special about these circuits is they are perfect for lighting and use less power than standard inverters and can be made in the garage workshop.

Getting the simple dimmer circuit developed was a bonus.  Not having to resort to capacitors, diodes, potentiometers and resistors is nice.

Next up for me is a Morph between a Bedini like motor and a Joule Thief with no solid state components.  It should provide 60 hz AC.  Give me a week.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #227 on: July 06, 2012, 07:00:21 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline NickZ

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4971
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #228 on: July 06, 2012, 09:00:34 PM »
  Steven and All:
  Those are very encouraging numbers there.  I'm hoping to be able to reach them myself sometime. I was also wondering the same thing as Lynx was concerned about, as to how much brightness was obtained comparatively, but had no idea that it would be as high as the 110v grid connections, but at much lower current usage levels. 
Great results guys, especially when using the smaller and more affordable "Blackberry Version".

  Overunity does not exist, and is a misconception, and a misnomer.
You are already there, when connecting to solar panels. Free is free, even if it costs a bit to initially set it up.
Maybe the 6 to 10 led bulbs can be lit from an affordable 10 or 20 watt solar panel set up. Which are not that expensive to buy now.  2  10 watt panels, costs only $60 now, for a total of 20 watts.  So, that's not too bad... especially when using the $2  104 lumen led bulbs. 5 bulbs for $10 = 500+ lumens. Total cost less than $100.
 
  I now keep the joule lamp on all night long lighting a single CFL, I've used two AAs, and after two nights they are still at 1.5 volts. Wow!

  BTW:  the link to the cheap $1.99 2 watt Led bulbs listed on E-bay (about 104 lumens each), that I had mentioned previously are what Hitman uses in his videos. So, they do work well even off of his 6  small 3 volt garden light solar cells, charging a 6 volt battery. I've been working on replicating his set up, also, but it's been overcast the last several days here, and so my 6 tiny garden light solar cells don't add up to much current, when trying to charge a 12 volt battery.

  Also, just letting you know that the CFLs, can be dimmed when they are gutted, and the warm white CFLs give off a light that is very similar to regular incandescent bulbs, which are still my favorites.  I'm still using CFLs, as they are free to reuse when they die, an early death, as many of them do. So, no need to throw them out, and they will never burn out when they are used as in my "Mango Version" of the Joule Lamp.

  Thanks for all you've done, it has not gone unnoticed.
                                                                                  Nick


Offline JouleSeeker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 685
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #229 on: July 06, 2012, 09:14:59 PM »
Thanks Lynxsteam and Nick; looking forward to further working with you.

Quote
"Next up for me is a Morph between a Bedini like motor and a Joule Thief with no solid state components.  It should provide 60 hz AC.  Give me a week.
Can you make the frequency "tunable"?  I'd like that!
Anyway, sounds like a great project.  Pls keep us updated on your progress.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #229 on: July 06, 2012, 09:14:59 PM »
Sponsored links:




cyber19

  • Guest
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #230 on: July 06, 2012, 11:15:34 PM »
 
  I now keep the joule lamp on all night long lighting a single CFL, I've used two AAs, and after two nights they are still at 1.5 volts. Wow!


I missed this setup can you give details or post number. I am guessing the 2 AA are in series.

I am looking to do the same with a CFL plus mod an 11 LED camping lamp that uses 3 AAs in series. I was hoping to use the 3 AAs in parallel for extended run time.

Offline Lynxsteam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 172
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #231 on: July 07, 2012, 02:26:55 AM »
Hi Joule Seeker,

The device I am making will mount to a wall, much like the Joule Lamp.  It will be powered by 12 vdc.  It will have a small wheel, that when you spin the lights will come on.  Stop the wheel, lights off.  I don't think it will adjust to load.  It will back charge if there is no load.  My guess is it will be very efficient based on my work with the SSG Bedini motor (battery charger).

I imagine with some tinkering we can get different frequencies.  What frequency do you want?  Generally the smaller diameter the higher the frequency, or the higher the voltage the higher the frequency.  The idea is to avoid the heat energy lost at the transistor.  I know many people say theirs run stone cold, but when the lights are bright the transistors usually get warm or even hot (heat sink).

Another advantage is we can pull more power off this device because we aren't limited by the transistor in reverse bias mode.  The limit will be the ampacity of the primary.  I am shooting for 60 watts at 120 volts ac.  That will be 5 amps on primary and 0.5 amp on secondary.

I'll hold off on more details in this thread until I make the thing and it works.  Then I will probably start a new thread.

Yes this is fun stuff.  The power is out here so its nice to have the efficient lighting. :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #231 on: July 07, 2012, 02:26:55 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline jbignes5

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1281
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #232 on: July 07, 2012, 05:00:16 AM »
Jbignes5,

That is a different application which is why I haven't jumped on it.  If you are running different numbers of LEDs it might not work as well.  But if you parallel all LEDs it shouldn't be an issue.  Lets think, if you parallel all LEDs you need about 3.5-3.9 volts.  What voltage will you run?  Is it 12 volt?  You aren't running 120 volt bulbs like we are doing.
If this is 12 volt then you need a step down transformer.
If your primary is 90 turns and your secondary is 30 it should be fine.  The voltage spikes will be higher than 4 volts but will be absorbed by the LEDs as amps.
Look back in this thread and see the LJL Mini.  I would make something like that but use bell wire or CAT5 wire for the primary and secondary.  One layer of secondary, 30 turns, 3 layers of primary, 30 turns each.  You may also want to wind this on a Torroid or one of those snap together ferrite chokes.
Build the circuit as usual and tie the main power into your ignition switch "run" position.
Then feed the secondary output to all your light switches.  You may need to have at least a couple of LEDs running somewhere (tail-lights) all the time so the circuit is oscillating.

In modern cars the LEDs are configured in series so they run off the normal voltage.  I think they use 6 in a string for 12 volts.  Check the LED package.  Reds run on lower voltage than whites, yellows, blues....


 No it's a far cry from your setup. But I was thinking it should be able to run off a small rechargable pack. Most likely 6 volts or round about there. It would be nice to get a few days of charge out of a pack under heavy use.


 The power pack for my scooter is 24 volts. But I didn't want to take the chance and tie it into the lighting because I would like them to be separate systems for now.


 I was thinking of running the lights in 2 led strings, one for low beam and another added for high beam. The stop and turn signals I figure should be 2 for each turn signal so 4 for each side. The stop light I haven't figured out yet. Prolly 4 or 5 there.  They are 3.2v 24ma 30000mcd whites. Like I said I got a bunch of them. Maybe if I put them in 4 series all paralleled it would work out. Yeah that will work. So the leds will need 13 or so volts for the series of 4. Not all of them will be running at the same time. Would that be a problem with your system?


 So would a boost from 6v-12v work? or is it 1/3 or 4v work for the battery?

Offline Lynxsteam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 172
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #233 on: July 07, 2012, 12:45:06 PM »
Jbignes5,

I had two scooters, one was a Vespa 90, the other a 1960 Vespa GS.  I loved both.  I totally decked out the GS with every chrome accessory known to mankind.  It was white with red stripes.  Those were fun times.  I managed a college coffeehouse in Calif before it was mainstream.

Attached is a schematic of what I would do.  Study up on various ways to run tail / turn signals.  Often they are the same lights and they are just interrupted by a flasher.  Your LEDs (2 in series) should run fine on 5.8-6.5 volts which is a typical range for a healthy 6 volt battery.  You could add a small 6 volt solar cell somewhere to keep the 6 volt topped up.  Since your voltage is so close to the what your two LEDs need you don't need a series resistor.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #233 on: July 07, 2012, 12:45:06 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline jbignes5

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1281
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #234 on: July 07, 2012, 03:09:48 PM »
 Yeah so how can I fit your system into that? I was thinking of using the leds in groups of 4's to lower the current draw via voltage doubling before the leds system. The groups of 4 work well. I'll see if I can draw it up as to the connections of the various lights. I could even get away with 3 volt supply then converting it up to 12 volts via the air transformer you have devised. I'll draw up the connections to let you see the load and how it should be connected.

 My scooter is an electric 500 watt and is pretty basic of a setup. Future plans include bigger seat and shocks of course. But it does well for a cheaper scooter. The power pack is one I devised of parallel 24 volt 12 ah batts.

 I am working on a new system to power it which means I must get rid of the controller and install a new one of my own design. The 500 watt motor will be redesigned to take advantage of some Tesla features in a new type of exciter/generator/motor. I'm collecting the parts as we speak. The only thing I have left to do is the rotor and housing. I have the field core, magnets(generator for the field exciter) and two different motors. One is the 500 watt dc and another is an ac induction motor. I might even wind my own motor because Tesla was soo specific to the design of the prime mover that it might be worth it to develop and use this design.

 But for the meantime I am gonna need a power supply for the lights and maybe even a small information panel to tell things like speed and battery levels.

 Thanks for the time you are allowing me to distract you from your projects. I really would appreciate the help in designing this system.

 Thanks,
 John Bigness

P.S.
 So it would be 3.2 volts per led X 4 = 12.8 volts per string of 4
 max of 6 strings but not all of them will be on at one time. Max strings active could only be 5 since I'm not including a hazard feature on this version. 2 strings min I'm guessing.

Offline sparks

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2528
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #235 on: July 08, 2012, 09:16:05 PM »
 
   Sorry for the intrusion but it is weird I was thinking about producing a Tesla coil/cap and putting it on a moped I adapted for electric drive.  The bike as it is works on 24vdc.  I control the bike with a variable field flux drive.  You open this baby up at around 20mph and the bike takes off like a rocket till it becomes a little hairy.  Mopeds don't like going over 30mph.  The coil cap is light compared to the batteries but the voltage is really hairy.  How the heck can I step this down to 24 v while still maintaining control of the discharge.  Vacuum tubes capable of 10,000 volt tube bias and grid isolation are hard to come by if at all.  Any ideas would be appreciated.
 
 
 

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #235 on: July 08, 2012, 09:16:05 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline Lynxsteam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 172
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #236 on: July 12, 2012, 04:28:58 AM »
I have been playing with the Bedini SSG again.  I tried making a square wave output using N - S magnets, but failed.  It can be done with more complication.  I tried to use brushes alternating the field but the drag from the brushes wouldn't allow spinup without a lot of power being used.
So back to the classic design with a few mods.  I added an isolated secondary to see if I could backcharge.  It works, but I may have it out of phase. 

If there is a way to have input equal output it seems to me the energy has to enter the system from somewhere.  It can be a seemingly passive entrance of energy from magnets passing by coils, or a siphon of energy from around us.  It is good fun and good exercise for my curiosity.

This topic doesn't belong here.  I should put further information in the right thread.

Here's the video
http://youtu.be/fPAY7eRovwo

Offline JouleSeeker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 685
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #237 on: July 12, 2012, 07:01:35 AM »
  I liked your vid, Lynxsteam -- very nice, as usual! 

  You note at the end that the LED bulb draws half the power, compared to the LJL (if I understood properly).  Any explanation?

   Also, what kind of diodes did you use in the FWBRectifier?
Thanks again.

Offline Lynxsteam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 172
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #238 on: July 12, 2012, 04:30:08 PM »
Joule Seeker,

First - that bulb is a 3w Phillips LED.  For some reason it pulls a lot of power off the grid and off my LJL, so I don't typically use it for analysis.  It would normally run at 1.2 amps and 12 volts.  But on this Bedini motor it pulls about 600 ma.  I think this is because it is half bright.

The Bedini motor or oscillator is not a great way to run the LEDs.  The frequency is slow and the pulses are choppy instead of the nice smooth sine wave from the grid or the fast chopped output off the LJL.  But I am just starting to explore.  A smoothing capacitor would help.

Those diodes are 1000V, 1 amp IN4007

I changed today to a smaller power coil and rpm is much higher, amp draw lower.  If I am going to generate voltage above battery the rpm will need to be high. 

Playing with the trigger to maximize transistor off time and maximize induction time is the key to self running.  I doubt I will do it, but it is fun to try.  And it is fun to watch that wheel spin so fast on such little power.  The video was just a montage of things I have tried so far.  YouTube should be entertaining.
:)

Offline Lynxsteam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 172
Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #239 on: July 18, 2012, 12:25:09 AM »
I found something interesting.  Playing with the larger aircore LJL I hooked up a 120 v LED bulb with no transistor.  No collector at , no base connection.  The bulb lights at .3 watt or .7 watt depending on the dim switch setting.  I will post a video later.  Off to go water skiing.  Its hot!


 

OneLink