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Author Topic: Joule Lamp  (Read 299804 times)

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #195 on: June 28, 2012, 12:36:33 AM »
People make goofy Videos when they hit the 1000 subscribers mark, so I made a video celebrating a lot of my videos and tidbits of my life.  I called the lighting of two bulbs with a 9 volt a "parlor trick" because without explanation it is just a novelty.  Really no trick.  The amp draw is about 580 ma at 8.75 volts.  Why are the bulbs so bright?  Dunno!

I mis-spoke calling them 15 watt bulbs, they of course are together 15-16 watts at full brightness on grid.

I think too, this is proof that a larger coil has more capacitance, just like a larger battery has more ampacity.  When this Bad Boy fires it sends a lot of energy to the bulbs.  The only thing I don't like is this one rings a little.  It rings at the battery and the tube.  Not as bad as an E-Core, but its annoying.  Today I was running two bulbs and through an aluminum wire wrapped around a fluxed welding rod in some water and there is definitely a lot of bubbles and no heating.  I didn't want to try lighting the gas, because so far the day has been pretty nice! :)

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #195 on: June 28, 2012, 12:36:33 AM »

Offline PhiChaser

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #196 on: June 28, 2012, 04:28:29 PM »
Hey, I just wanted to make an observation about the wire guages you are using because I think this is VERY important in how these coils interact with each other. Just like length of coil, number of turns, etc...
14AWG conductor diameter in inches: 0.0641
20AWG conductor diamer in inches: 0.032
Notice anything?
So if we take that idea and apply it to a smaller size wize:
24AWG: 0.0201
30AWG: 0.01
Any thoughts?
PC
EDIT: Yes, I understand the smaller wire can't handle as many amps. :)

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #197 on: June 28, 2012, 05:46:31 PM »
PhiChaser,

I know what you are getting at, that the diameters don't make sense.  Vinyl coated PVC insulated primary wire of 14 awg stranded copper wire is about 0.125" Diameter (depends on manufacturer).  20 awg magnet wire is 0.0319" diameter.  Its is difficult if not impractical to have the wires perfectly next to each other when winding.  If it were possible then for a nine inch length we would have 75 turns primary and 281 turns secondary (843 total).  Its better to shoot for 73-75 turns primary and 258 secondary (774 total).  This gives roughly the 10.6:1 turns ratio. 
So if changes in the size aircoil are made using different wire sizes, its best to calculate based on wire diameters.

My large aircore uses 18 awg secondary and 12 awg insulated stranded primary.  120:1200 turns.

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #197 on: June 28, 2012, 05:46:31 PM »
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Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #198 on: June 28, 2012, 07:39:28 PM »
...

My large aircore uses 18 awg secondary and 12 awg insulated stranded primary.  120:1200 turns.

That is impressive, Lynx.

  As we have discussed, measuring output-power can be tricky from a device such as this, and a simple water calorimeter was suggested by Chet and me.

To follow up on this idea, I've done a short vid this morning -- which shows a very simple water calorimeter and how I tested that it can quite useful and reliable:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ICpD37usIE&feature=youtu.be

One needs to be able to operate the device with the output power going into a simple resistance, and I think we're approaching this point.

The text:
Today I set up a simple water calorimeter, to measure output energy and power with decent accuracy.  I have other calorimeters, but this is to show how straightforward it is, and to allow the experimenter to get a handle on output power -- which can often be tricky with output that is far from DC or sinusoidal AC; for example, from a blocking oscillator or Don Smith-type device.   


   Water is weighed in grams with a scale that cost about $10 and placed in a styrofoam cup.  Or you could use a graduated cylinder, 1ml = 1gram for water. Temperature change (delta-T) is measured in Centigrade using a TK thermometer, that cost about $10 also.  For this check, I used a power supply to give me 14 V and measure the current; I could have used a battery at 12 V (for example) and an ammeter.

The power is dumped into an "immersion heater" (about $7) which is simply a resistive coil; this is stirred in the water to heat the volume of water.  At room temp, the resistance was 53 ohms.  Time is measured with a stop-watch on my wrist.  Easy.

Result:
Power-input = 14V @ 0.264A = 3.7 Watts input.
Energy output = Qheating = 4.19 J/g-degC (H2Omass) (delta-TempC) =
   4.19 x 316g x 0.9C = 1192J
This heating required 5min19s = 319 seconds, so the output power measured in the calorimeter is:
Poutput = Eoutput/Time = 1192J/319sec = 3.7Watts -- which agrees very well with the input power.

Thus, we have tested the simple water calorimeter and shown that it WORKS!  It is a valuable tool for measuring output energy and power.

In another test, I ran at 12V @226mA = 2.7W and the water heated from 21.2 to 21.6 Degrees-C in 210S.  So
Eout = 4.19 (316g) 0.4C = 531J, and the power-out is
Pout = 531J/210s = 2.5W, compared to the known 2.7W in. 
To get decent accuracy, one needs to run for a long enough time to heat the water by nearly 1deg-C or so.

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #199 on: June 28, 2012, 08:11:52 PM »
This is excellent!

My team had a similar problem to solve in testing large alternator output power.  We cross checked meter readings with temperature rise.  We used nine 1500 watt heating elements in various series and parallel arrangements and ran the alternator through its rpm range.  We couldn't find any better way to measure true power output, because we needed a load, and most loads will change resistance when heated so they are a moving target.

Any changes in resistance occurring due to heat are captured at the output with your technique.  We also recorded temperature rise in the alternator.

Now the only question is whether you can be sure running the blocking oscillator output through a resistive load is the same as what it would be through the LEDs.  The only way I might suggest is to find a resistive load that runs the circuit at the same frequency as the LED load.  LEDs give off light energy and heat, whereas heating elements give off primarily heat.  Seems like what you are testing is power output at that frequency into that specific load.

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #199 on: June 28, 2012, 08:11:52 PM »
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Offline NerzhDishual

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #200 on: June 29, 2012, 01:48:29 AM »
Hi Lynx Lampistes, Physics Profs, Joule Robbers, NRG Hunters, Witty Experimenters,
Skeptics, Trolls and my Sister in Law (for ex.)

Sorry for disturbing.

With my (near botched) Lynx Joule Lamp, I'm not (still?) able to run any of these led bulbs.
Just bl' blinkings observed. I'm not interested in these deadly CFLs (and vaccines, BTW)

I have made another primary coil (I mean: the one with less turns) with about twice more turns.
Now I'm drawing about 100 ma (under 12 volts). (VS about 400 ma with my previous primary coil).
I'm definitely more confident with my small fluorescents tubes.

I have noticed that the brightness of these tubes seems not depending upon their
"Watts" but upon their Lenghts!

4 Watts: length 136 mm
6 Watts: length 212 mm
8 Watts: length 288 mm
(Diameter 16 mm)
My 'secondary' coil length is about 230 mm.

A 8 watts bulb 'looks' more efficient than a 6 watts one.
These 4 watts tubes are definitely useless as they refuse to give obvious lights!

IMO, this fluorescent tube just act as a kinda antenna.
It also likes (= needs)  to be placed parallel to the coils.
BTW: I use only one wire.
You add another fluorescent tube. You do not not draw much amp.
It also seems that you gain some more luxs.
Now! using any 'light box' (= a kinda Faraday cage) could be not so evident. But might be done.

In the same vein, and In My Poor Bloody Froggy Opinion (IMYPOBLOFO), trying to measure
-if it is the case-  and -as far as I can catch it- any output of such a LJL device with calorimetry
seems not so appropriate.

Gwella gourhemennou a-berz Jean.

Offline PhiChaser

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #201 on: June 29, 2012, 05:52:58 AM »
PhiChaser,

I know what you are getting at, that the diameters don't make sense.  Vinyl coated PVC insulated primary wire of 14 awg stranded copper wire is about 0.125" Diameter (depends on manufacturer).  20 awg magnet wire is 0.0319" diameter.  Its is difficult if not impractical to have the wires perfectly next to each other when winding.  If it were possible then for a nine inch length we would have 75 turns primary and 281 turns secondary (843 total).  Its better to shoot for 73-75 turns primary and 258 secondary (774 total).  This gives roughly the 10.6:1 turns ratio. 
So if changes in the size aircoil are made using different wire sizes, its best to calculate based on wire diameters.

My large aircore uses 18 awg secondary and 12 awg insulated stranded primary.  120:1200 turns.
My point was that the actual wire diameter IS doubled, which is what you said there at the end; It DOES make sense. You should end up with similar ratios using 30AWG magnet wire and 24AWG WITH insulation (like category wire). A smaller version of your current build is what I'm thinking... Pipe size would have to be scaled down as well (IMO, maybe 3/4"pvc?) but I'm a noob at this so??
I totally understand that you can't get even wraps, it just seems like to me like it would scale down nicely... Maybe a 1.5v to 12v coil? That could be handy! Cat wire can be pretty unpredictable as far as insulation thickness goes (and how much tension you use winding with it heh heh).
Happy experimenting,
PC

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #201 on: June 29, 2012, 05:52:58 AM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #202 on: June 29, 2012, 08:25:24 PM »
That's interesting and quite by accident that the copper portion of the wire diameter is double. 

I am attaching a drawing that might help some of you convert your LJL to this newer version.  Hopefully you can unwind the secondary onto a spool, reconfigure and try this latest setup.  You don't need the PVC end caps, nor do you need the switches.  Basically its just the coil tube and wiring to the transistor and LED bulbs.  This circuit design will light LED bulbs very brightly, or you can dim them at 50% power.

Hopefully someone will try this on bamboo for a cool tropical look!  Sort of a Gilligan version.

Offline ehsanco1962

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #203 on: June 29, 2012, 10:03:39 PM »
Hi LYnxsteam

Thank you for shearing your interesting video and schematic  ,interesting setup you have on the final one the small
Version, the  large  version need expensive wire (12#AWG)but this one is cool  but I have a couple question :
First I couldn't find PVC with same diameter can I use a little bit larger diameter .
Second we don't use in Europe 120v so all the LEDs we have are 220v will these LEDs work with this circuit .

Thank you in advance

Ehsan




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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #203 on: June 29, 2012, 10:03:39 PM »
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Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #204 on: June 30, 2012, 12:13:12 AM »
Hi LYnxsteam

Thank you for shearing your interesting video and schematic  ,interesting setup you have on the final one the small
Version, the  large  version need expensive wire (12#AWG)but this one is cool  but I have a couple question :
First I couldn't find PVC with same diameter can I use a little bit larger diameter .
Second we don't use in Europe 120v so all the LEDs we have are 220v will these LEDs work with this circuit .

Thank you in advance

Ehsan


Ehsan -- the bulbs I'm using here with Lynxsteam's build are actually 220V LED bulbs!  and they work just fine, better than any 120V LED bulb I've tried in fact. 
The particular bulbs I'm using most -- not that you should necessarily use the same bulbs -- are these (shown below).

Also, "First I couldn't find PVC with same diameter can I use a little bit larger diameter ."  That should not make much difference IMHO.


Offline PhiChaser

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #205 on: June 30, 2012, 05:56:38 AM »
That's interesting and quite by accident that the copper portion of the wire diameter is double. 

I am attaching a drawing that might help some of you convert your LJL to this newer version. 
@ LS: So did you already have a smaller version planned or is this a new build?
Happy experimenting,
PC

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #205 on: June 30, 2012, 05:56:38 AM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #206 on: June 30, 2012, 01:21:29 PM »
I have made three sizes of these.  Each diameter is double the next.  3/4" D, 1.5" D and 3" D.  Each has a length about double the other.  What you make will depend on how many bulbs you want to run, and what materials you may have handy.  They all work very well.  Larger LJL Aircores have more capacity and can handle more bulbs.
The medium sized LJL is a nice size, not too big, and can handle at least a room of light.  The larger version can handle several rooms, whereas the small version can handle 4-6 bulbs.

Here is Part 1 of the "How To" series on making these AirCores.  Part 2 will cover wiring the circuit and testing.

http://youtu.be/3C-WW9gd8SM

Offline ehsanco1962

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #207 on: June 30, 2012, 04:01:21 PM »

Hi LYnxsyeam


Thank you for the response and the nice educational video I like these how to videos looking forward for part 2 neat winding ,does it matter if we use strand or sold insulated wire  for the primary ?


Ehsan

Offline ehsanco1962

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #208 on: June 30, 2012, 04:16:07 PM »

Ehsan -- the bulbs I'm using here with Lynxsteam's build are actually 220V LED bulbs!  and they work just fine, better than any 120V LED bulb I've tried in fact. 
The particular bulbs I'm using most -- not that you should necessarily use the same bulbs -- are these (shown below).

Also, "First I couldn't find PVC with same diameter can I use a little bit larger diameter ."  That should not make much difference IMHO.


Hi JouleSeeker


Thank you,  its good for these coils to work on this wide of range of voltage 120-220v.


Ehsan

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #209 on: June 30, 2012, 05:53:16 PM »
You can use solid wire for the primary as long as it is thickly insulated and achieves the turns ratio closely spaced.  You can try most anything and see how it works.  You can use bell wire for the secondary but you wont get as many turns in the same space, so you would need to adjust the primary turns.
We are trying to make this as small and powerful as we can.

 

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