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Author Topic: Joule Lamp  (Read 290893 times)

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #30 on: May 15, 2012, 04:55:28 AM »
Congratulations, Lynx!  indeed its time for lumens/watt testing.Let me see if I can explain how easy this really is, how I'm going about it.  I would like to do these measurements, but I'm way behind you on the builds (you are fast!), so I'm going to encourage you (and all) to build a simple light box.  Here's the vid I put up just now:

http://youtu.be/XoGJ_tG2QBM

  Vid shows the "light box" I put together with my son today for these devices and how it is calibrated.
We first take one bulb of KNOWN lumens output, specified on the package and  place the bulb in the light box.  (I use the middle position on the power strip as seen in the video.) Turn the bulb on.  We note the lux as measured by the light/ lux meter.  We check that the Watts-input is close to that specified for the bulb (on the package again).   

 
The package on this CFL bulb says it puts out 900 Lumens (Lm) running at 13W.   
 I find with repeated measurements -- when the CFL bulb has warmed up -- the light output is 10920 Lux (average).  Then, I divide:
900 Lumens/10920 Lux = 0.082 Lm/Lux.   

 
I repeated this calibration for an LED light, 600 Lumens running at 9.5 W is seen from the Light Box as 7280 Lux, again 0.082 Lm/Lux for this light box.  (Each light box will have its own conversion factor, Lm/Lux, which can be calibrated in just this way.)

 
Repeated for a 60 W bulb, 850 Lm / 10760 lux observed = 0.079 Lm/Lux.
Repeated for a 40 W, 75 W, 90 W and 100 W incandescent bulbs also, the average is about 0.080 Lm/Lux +/- approx 6%. You can just use 3-4 light bulbs for calibration. Close enough to really help us in this research!

 
_____

 So I put in a second bulb (done with incandescent and CFL) in the front position, and got very close to the same 0.080 conversion factor. That is, the second bulb DOUBLED (very close) the lux light output on the meter.  When I put a bulb in the back position (near the switch on the power strip), the conversion factor was about 0.085 showing that a bulb in this position gives a non-linear response; which is OK with this separate calibration for the two bulbs in these positions.

For three CFL bulbs, in the three positions with adapters as seen in the vid, I found:

2700 Lumens / 29600 Lux on the meter  = 0.091
(a larger conversion factor as I expected, because less lux reaching the light meter with three bulbs in this configuration)

____________

Now that the box has been calibrated, we can place an UNKNOWN light source into the box in the same spot, or two  or three light sources in the locations described, and measure the light output in Lux on the meter.  Then,
Lumens output = 0.08 * Lux (for one bulb,as read on the meter). 

For more bulbs, would use the appropriate calibration factor we have determined... Easy!


Finally, we determine the input power (if from a battery and DC, P = I*V, current times voltage), and calculate Lumens-out per Watts input -- Lm/W.

 
  The idea is to MAXIMIZE Lm/W in various test devices, such as Lasersaber's SJR 2.0, and Lynxsteam's Teslamp.  (Great work, gentlemen!)  I strongly recommend use of a light box for quantitative measurements of Lumens-out/Watts-in so we can make solid scientific progress. 

For comparison, we calculate a few known values from bulb packages:
Incandescent, e.g., 850 Lm for 60W bulb => 14 Lm/W
Fluorescent, CFL, e.g. 900 Lm for 13 W bulb => 69 Lm/W
LED, e.g., 600 Lm for 9.5 W bulb => 63 Lm/W.

 
I strongly recommend use of a light box for quantitative measurements.

  A value above  100 Lm/W would be very interesting!  Let's see what we can come up with.   
 
 

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #30 on: May 15, 2012, 04:55:28 AM »

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #31 on: May 15, 2012, 05:18:57 AM »
Attached shows the light meter I used...  Cheap and good! from Amazon.
Input power meter was useful also, monitors input power if 120V 60 Hz -- from ebay, see attached.

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #32 on: May 15, 2012, 06:23:57 AM »
PS -- size of the box doesn't matter too much; needs to clear the lamps by a few inches at least (temp concerns).

I was looking for a Xerox box, removable lid would be nice.  Found a tall box with top flaps -- works well.
Size of box will affect your calibration factor, which you get from measurements from bulbs with known-lumens (see posts above). 

Smallish holes admit wires for power-strip and light-meter as needed.  Took my son and I about 20 minutes to build this morning.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #32 on: May 15, 2012, 06:23:57 AM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2012, 01:32:35 PM »
JouleSeeker,

Great work on the Lightbox.  There is a lot of ambiguity when experimenters are quoting brightness.  Words like "fairly bright with just 600 ma" is pretty loose science.   I always start with loose science to get in the ballpark quickly and then circuits and methods need to be tuned.  I will be happy to send you a 25 watt DC converter as I have built.  It would be great if you would test it for efficiency.  You have spent the money on the Lightbox, no need for us to both duplicate.

There are simple ways to tune the Lynx Joule Lamp circuit without bleeding power through resistors.  Today I will do a video showing how a small 12 v solar panel can easily power LED bulbs. 

Offline b_rads

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Yippee!
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2012, 03:46:55 PM »
 8)
Got my LJL (Lynx Joule Lamp) put together last night on a test board and it works.  This replication was built as near the same specs as Lynxsteam showed.  Running off 12 Volts, I can adjust the current to just below 100 mA and up to 400 mA.  The interesting thing I noticed, when started at 400 mA and allowed to warm up, I could drop the current to 200 ma without any observable degradation in light output.  Below 200 mA and the light gets considerably dimmer.  Using the taps, the minimum number of winds that the light would start up was when the current was highest and the bulb the brightest.  Increasing the number of winds lowered the current draw and the bulb got dimmer (sounds crazy huh).  Next, I need to chart the taps and current draw and graph out to see how this is working.  Thanks again Lynxsteam for the wonderful plans and vids that made this a relatively simple build.
 
Brad S   :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Yippee!
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2012, 03:46:55 PM »
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Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #35 on: May 15, 2012, 03:50:02 PM »
JouleSeeker,

Great work on the Lightbox.  There is a lot of ambiguity when experimenters are quoting brightness.  Words like "fairly bright with just 600 ma" is pretty loose science.   I always start with loose science to get in the ballpark quickly and then circuits and methods need to be tuned.  I will be happy to send you a 25 watt DC converter as I have built.  It would be great if you would test it for efficiency.  You have spent the money on the Lightbox, no need for us to both duplicate.

This is very kind of you, Lynxsteam!  much appreciated and YES, I will test it out.  Glad to do it.

At the same time, I'm hoping some researchers will join in the measurement of light output using the light-box technique -- or some OTHER method that can likewise be calibrated.  I think that such measurements will help us progress more rapidly.

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #36 on: May 15, 2012, 04:08:12 PM »
Awesome!  and a much prettier build too.  Your help in discovering the best setup is much appreciated.

Here is a video showing the LJL with 45 watts of LED warm light bulbs off the larger air-core setup.  I thought this would max at 25 watt output but here its putting out 30 watts (consuming 30 watts).  Next up is to evaluate the light output off 30 watts consumption.  I am excited about this circuit because I know two church groups that install "rain catchers" in the Carribean and bringing some light for these people would be huge.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yftaQD-hsPY

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #36 on: May 15, 2012, 04:08:12 PM »
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Offline NerzhDishual

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #37 on: May 15, 2012, 07:35:56 PM »

Hi Joules  Burglars,

Thanks a lot for all to all of you and specially to Lynxsteam.
This is real Open Source:
clair explanations;
successfull replications;
witty suggestions;
a lot of very informative vids;
no exotic components or parts...

For my part, and for the moment, I would like to ask a question.
Is this LJL CCT interpretation/re-sketching right?
Or I am mixing the wires?  My electronic abilities are not too good. :P
This CCT (CirCuiT) is not conventional. Is it?

Very Best

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #38 on: May 15, 2012, 08:17:55 PM »
Very nice drawing.  Yes, you have it right. 

I have reversed a few wires on accident and it wont work, but thankfully it doesn't fry the transistor.
I am not sure that the reverse winding of primary from secondary matters, maybe someone here knows.  I just don't modify because it works.  I wind the secondary CW and primary CCW.

If you want to run CFL bulbs you need to have a turn ratio of about 20:1.  For the LED bulbs about 10:1.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #38 on: May 15, 2012, 08:17:55 PM »
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Offline conradelektro

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #39 on: May 15, 2012, 10:28:06 PM »
First tests with CoilZilla:

CFLs (tube only) work nicely at 12 Volts (2 x 40 turns primary).

CFLs (tube only) also work at 6 Volt (20 + 30 turns primary).

Some LED-Lamps (as bought for 220 Volt) work at 6 Volt  (2 x 40 turns primary).

In order to run 220 V LED-Lamps at 12 Volt, one needs more turns for the primary (may be 2 x 80 turns).

Also the CFLs at 12 Volt could need a few more turns (may be 2 x 50 turns primary).

A 10K resistor between the base of the transistor and the positive rail is not really necessary but the circuit starts swinging more reliably when it is present.

The MJE17004 transistor worked better than the 2N3055, which often did not start to swing when power was switched on (also a resistor at the base did not help with the 2N3055).

It is possible to light LED-lamps with this coil at 2 to 3 Volt (2 x 30 turn primary), CFLs started at 3 Volt.

I bought some 220 Volt LED-lamps which did not work at all (they blinked). So, not all 220 Volt LED-lamp types will work, it depends on the internal circuit of these lamps. May be they will work with a 2 x 80 turn primary.

I will put a new primary on CoilZilla (2 x 80 turns, taps at 40, 50, 60, 70), but it will take time.

Remember, CoilZilla has opposing coil halves. I do not know whether opposing coil halves are really necessary, because I would have to wind a similar coil without opposing coil halves for comparison.

The power consumption was a bit less than the Wattage specified on the lamps. But for optimal power transfer between primary and secondary the coil probably needs more turns for the primary. Eventually the coil has to be adapted for a specific lamp and a specific supply voltage (I aim for a 12 Volt power supply and a 5 Watt LED lamp or two 2.5 Watt LED lamps).

Greetings, Conrad

Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #40 on: May 15, 2012, 11:12:33 PM »
Hi folks, nice work everyone.
Lynsteam, I can confirm the advantage of these types of circuits, though I made a comparison test using the standard joule ringer 2.0, 2n3055 transistor with a large stock transformer and labelled 15 watt cfl.
Test 1) I used a 12 volt to 120 volt vector inverter to power non-modified 15 watt cfl, amp draw was 2.2 amps or around 26.4 watts.
Test 2) Used joule ringer 2.0 circuit with 12 volt input, 2n3055 transistor, no resistors or diodes, powering non-modified 15 watt cfl, amp draw was 1.2 amps or around 14.4 watts.
In both tests, the bulb brightness looked equal to my eyes.
The 2n3055 transistor in test 2 had no noticeable heat.

If anything, these tests may just prove that these cfl bulbs have incorrectly tuned power factors and these homemade circuits cure that problem.
Though It looks like your tests lynxsteam, also confirm that at least the led bulbs you tested, also have incorrectly tuned power factor or these circuits are just more efficient.
What this means is, we can use these circuits to fully light non-modified cfls and led bulbs for almost twice as long on a 12 volt battery and could be converted to use AC wall power to lower the power bill.
peace love light
tyson ;) :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #40 on: May 15, 2012, 11:12:33 PM »
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Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #41 on: May 15, 2012, 11:37:46 PM »
hi folks, here is a video showing the non-modified 15 watt cfl lighting.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlajB1bRU3w
peace love light
tyson

Offline NerzhDishual

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #42 on: May 16, 2012, 02:02:08 AM »
Hi Lynx_Steam,

Thank your for answering and for your precisions.
IMO, this device is really amazing.
I will replicate it as best as I'm able to  and as soon as my natural laziness allows. :o

Should I dare? Another question please?
In your vid:
"Lynx Joule Lamp - Part 3"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_-6fyeGEaw
At about 8' 12", You use only one HV wire. Do you not?
No apparent potential difference.
That is kinda interesting indeed!
Are there any small diodes here?
Is it some Tesla's "magical trick"?

Very Best

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #43 on: May 16, 2012, 02:23:38 AM »
Great work everyone!  I get a weird feeling I am barging in here and usurping other people's limelight after all their hard work.  I would be happy to step back and let you all experiment.  It is not my intention to take anything away from all the really great experimenters here.  I do not intend to profit off any of this research.  Its just so much much fun!

Anyway.....Great work on the Coilzilla, Skywatcher, Jouleseeker, Brad and others replicating and exploring these devices.  I got a much more excited feeling after building the larger version of the 30+ watt LJL.  Somehow lighting one single LED or  one CFL isn't that exciting anymore.  Pushing the limits is a lot more fun.  "Go big or go home".

Answer to question.  If the circuit isn't a closed circuit the coil will act like a Tesla coil and light a CFL off one wire.  You can also hook up a CFL as a AV plug with two opposing diodes and it will light bright.  In this configuration radio interference could be a potential problem.  You can also light CFLs and LEDs wirelessly at about 6".

The most promising direction I see here is discovering best number of turns, location of primary and going for best power usage.  The experiment I did today confirmed that we can get a lot of watts out of the air-coil and stay in oscillation.  Then we need to back up and use those big amps efficiently.  I think the single power transistor can cope with 5 amps reversed biased.  That would be 60 watts!  Enough to light several rooms.

Offline NerzhDishual

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #44 on: May 16, 2012, 03:01:50 AM »

Great work everyone!  I get a weird feeling I am barging in here and usurping other people's limelight after all their hard work. 
I would be happy to step back and let you all experiment.  It is not my intention to take anything away
from all the really great experimenters here.  I do not intend to profit off any of this research.
Its just so much much fun!
........................................................................

Soit! Qu'il en soit ainsi si tel est votre désir.
And, BTW, thank for answering questions.

Very Best from Brest/Brittany/France





 

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