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Author Topic: Joule Lamp  (Read 319027 times)

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #255 on: September 25, 2012, 06:38:05 AM »
   I've really really miss this thread, as it has gone dormant.  I'm still working on my Solar Exciter Joule Lamp circuits, now lighting several 65 watt Cfl bulbs. I'll upload some pictures soon.
  But, I came across these Led bulbs today at Ebay, at only $1.42 each, 262 Leds in them, and I thought,  what a deal. They produce 650 lumens, so I think that these are the best bang for the buck, that I've seen yet.
  Check them out:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/E14-E27-G4-13W-263-LED-Warm-White-Cold-White-110V-220V-12V-Light-Bulb-Lamp-/110915987877?_trksid=p4340.m2109&_trkparms=aid%3D555001%26algo%3DPW.CURRENT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D7%26meid%3D2285308848695520876%26pid%3D100010%26prg%3D1004%26rk%3D4%26sd%3D300722284830%26
 
  Edit.
  It seams to be a price error, as they are really about $10 each, so not a great deal as I had thought. Anyways...


Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #256 on: September 25, 2012, 07:23:51 AM »
Nick:

Still not a bad deal at $10 as far as I can see.  650 lumens is pretty good.  I have a 700 lumen led new tech. type bulb that cost like $30 us.  I am almost afraid to play with it as it is very bright on mains juice.

Bill

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #257 on: September 25, 2012, 08:06:48 AM »
  I think that having an led bulb that can replace the amount of light brightness or lumen that we are used to having, but that uses much less current is still worth going for.  It's just that most led lights really don't do the job. Unless like to mentioned you pay $30 for them.
I'm hoping that within another year or so led lighting will be much more affordable. So far though, the Cfls are much cheaper for the same amount of light they provide, and when gutted they can be dimmed, and also come in warm white, plus they spread the light out evenly with no shadows.


Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #258 on: September 26, 2012, 11:04:46 PM »
Nick,

LaserSaber showed a JR 3.0 where instead of connection to the emmiter from the bulb swap it to the collector.  I tried it on my LJL and it works just fine.  I can't believe with all the crazy stuff I tried I didn't accidentally do that.  Some months ago another experimenter showed this and I can't remember who it was.
Anyway, I can light CFL bulbs and incandescent bulbs fully bright and beyond off the aircore, whereas before it pushed the reversed biased transistor to its limit.  The transistor would get too hot with these bulbs.
Not sure lighting Incandescent bulbs this way makes sense, CFL bulbs I can understand because they are so low cost and consume very little power.
Nothing wrong with the ferrite rod, just good to know the aircore will work too.
I may try a mini aircore to see what it will do with the circuit.  I'll design for one spool of Radio Shack 30 awg and some common bell wire and see if it wont do the job.
The Big aircore I made is a beast and will turn bulbs on like a blaze.  But no-one is going to want to build something that big.

Nick, one other note.  To light the CFL fully bright with the turns I use I needed to up the voltage to 18-20 volts DC.  If you purpose wind the aircore for CFLs you can design for whatever voltage you want.  Just drop the number of primary turns or increase the secondary turns.  There you go, fully bright CFLs.

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #259 on: September 27, 2012, 04:38:01 AM »
   The hang-up that I have lighting Cfls to full brightness, is that my transistors will not take even 12volts without overheating.
 If I increase the turns on the primary, the light output drops. I already have about 600 700 turns on the secondary. And instead of going more turns, I'm looking for a much smaller transformer, or inverter set up.  Ferrite is the answer in any case, as without it the coil has to be much much bigger. 
  Radio Shack here does not have the 2n3055, so I bought a couple of their smaller TIP 3055 which are actually MJE 3055T instead. I could not get them to give a wireless output on my Exciter circuits, although they will work when they are wired to the Cfl. But, I'll give them a try with my version of a smaller 3 inch ferrite rod wound similar to what LS is showing.
  The advantage of going with the incandescent bulbs is their quality of light, which to me is much nicer than what leds or Cfls give off. Yes, it costs more to produce good brightness with those bulbs, but if it's a free source of power coming from solar panels, doesn't matter, much. I'd rather had less light of better quality, than brighter obnoxious lights.  Warm whites are easier to put up with, in anycase, and bugs aren't as attacked to them,  like they are to bright florescent bulbs or leds.
 I've got lots of Cfls of all sizes up to 65 watts, so I'm trying to find a way to light them, wireless Exciters have been fun and different,  but I don't see them as better or more efficient over all.  yet.   I was hoping that many bulbs could be feed off of one big exciter, but there are also limitations with each additional bulb added to the circuit. I'm still hoping to find the way of getting more light with each added bulb, like the Doc had mentioned when using Leds, instead of less getting less light with each additional bulb, as is happening now.

  Lasersaber's  last 3.0 version is a winner,  cheap to build, only one component, one ferrite coil, no noise, and it can be made bigger, or down sized, also.  Hard to beat.
  Thanks, Lasersaber.

   And LynxSteam,  good to hear back from you again.  Really been missing your input and tests, lately.


Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #260 on: September 27, 2012, 06:08:51 AM »
Nick:

The TIP 3055 is what we used in the Jeanna's Circuit light.  That circuit puts out between 750 and 1,000 volts and will light up a bunch of stuff.  But again, the input here was just the little single AA battery.

Laser's circuit is amazing.  I may have to try this one also.

Bill

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #261 on: September 27, 2012, 01:52:09 PM »
Nick,

I am using the warm CFLs throughout my house now.  They cost 99 cents each and I can't tell the difference between them and an incandescent.  The light is a warm yellowish light.  I forgot that you are trying to light bulbs wirelessly.  You may do better with a Tesla Coil circuit.  I use the TIP 3055 for that with a capacitor, resistor in the circuit.  I can light 60 watts of florescents from about 3 feet off a well charged 12 volt.  Not sure why your transistors are heating up.  Maybe you could show us your circuit and we could help.

You realize incandescents are more like toasters.  Most of the power is heat when they are bright.  I understand that the power is free and you don't care.  You may want to try the warm white CFLs just out of curiosity.

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #262 on: September 28, 2012, 06:13:34 AM »
 No doubt the warm white Cfls are easier on the eyes, I do have several of those also. But the ungutted ones can't be dimmed,   At a dollar or two they are hard to beat for now. I don't like them in the bathroom because when I see myself in the mirror, I can see the difference on how they make you look, not as nice, like you've  got hepatitis, as they are yellower, and less golden.
It's also a matter of finding just the right bulb, as they are all different, so are all the Led bulb types.
 
  I'm working on a 3 inch long ferrite coil similar to the LS 3.0 ringer, but smaller.  I tried it with the Tip 31, but haven't got it running yet. 'll know more by tomorrow.
  If you have a video or description of your set up lighting 60 watts of Cfls,  let me know where to look, or upload a link if you can.

  Nick


Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #263 on: September 28, 2012, 02:03:09 PM »
Nick,

Here is a video of the Tesla coil (SEC exciter) powering multiple florescents.   I moved away from this and to the more practical lighting that can be achieved with the blocking oscillator direct connected to bulbs.  It does open the mind when you see power conveyed through thin air.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=598xpKIXMtk

Offline rxpc

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #264 on: October 02, 2012, 05:51:10 AM »
I made one of these lamps using a toilet paper roll, it's only 3-3/4 inches long at 1-1/2 inches diameter. I had some left over 30awg magnet wire, enough to wind two secondary layers of 250 turns. The primary is 16 turns of 22awg. Works great so far, I've been able to get down to using 502ma with a modified 13watt CFL at maybe 60% brightness. If I had more 30awg, I would add another layer of 250 and see how bright I can get the CFL.

I'm gonna try using heavier wire on the primary, and possibly try building the larger 5,0 version.
Not easy winding this sucker, all manual, difficult to keep the 30awg wire even on the roll, and especially after using clear tape to insulate after the first layer. I Should have used colored tape so I didn't see through to the first layer of red magnet wire.

Anyway, thanks for sharing this info, it was fun building, and if I add more layers, I keep you posted on progress.

Wind baby wind!!!

Offline Djoko

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #265 on: October 02, 2012, 06:35:54 AM »
Hi all,

I just beginer in this forum. I made this lamp also last week. I am using 1" x 9" pvc pipe. 0.2 mm x 600 turn on sec, 1.5 mm x 43 turn on primary, tip 3005 and running on 12 V batt. The 45 watt cfl get very bright at 1.65 amp. The output voltage extremly high ( almost 1500 v). The problem is the transistor getting very hot. 
Here is my short vid.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9DggKjswh8

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #266 on: October 02, 2012, 08:12:02 AM »
  Hello Lynxsteam and all:
   I'm still working on my 3.0 Ringer replication, using the smaller 3 inch ferrite rod.
   My transistors are still getting too hot on 12 volts though.
  It's very late at night here, I'll post some more tomorrow.
   The voltage on the circuit is about 10 volts, which is about what it can handle at the moment using the smaller transistors. I haven't had luck with the MJE 3055 (TIP 31), yet.
  I've got a 3inch coil from a crt monitor yoke. that I'm going to wind for this purpose, as I can't get the big expensive ferrite rod like LS uses.
   
           NickZ



Offline TinselKoala

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #267 on: October 02, 2012, 11:19:13 AM »
Very nice, showing lighting the low voltage LED and the much higher voltage NE-2 with the same output, and your fingers acting as part of the circuit. The ferrite helps by allowing you to make your coils physically smaller, but the basic idea is vrswr: voltage rise through standing wave resonance. Air core coils need to be larger to operate at the same frequencies but have the potential to give higher voltages and currents because there is no core to saturate.
These results are very impressive due to the low voltage input. Keep up the good work!

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #268 on: October 02, 2012, 11:21:58 AM »
Here's a schematic of the circuit I use for more power.  3055 Transistors can take a lot of power but if you want to push CFLs or fluorescents you will probably push plastic cased transistors beyond their 1 amp limit.  2N2222 transistors work fine for LED bulbs but are pushed hard by CFLs.
Connect two transistors in mirror image, but use a 1 Ohm resistor across the bases to even out any slight difference.  You can gang up several transistors this way.
This kind of defeats the purpose of simplicity, but if you really want to light more wattage this will help.
I still have my most reliable success using LEDs.  They take half the power of CFL's and incandescents are just silly off this DC converter.
Connecting bulb from HV coil and collector help keep the transistor in its power range.

I'll post some photos of my big LJL using the two transistors.


Offline rxpc

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #269 on: October 04, 2012, 10:04:48 AM »
Hi Lynxsteam,

  what kind of LED bulbs are you using? I think I can get as many as 40 primary winds on my little toilet roll setup, right now I have 2 layers of 250 winds of 30 awg wire secondary and 16 primary turns of 14 awg wire. I can light a 14 watt modded CFL light now close to 70% brightness and using 458ma. After adding a switching diode across the base/emitter, the CFL is brighter and....so far...seems to have eliminated my kick start issues.

I tried placing a ferrite rod inside the roll, but the CFL gets dimmer, I was using the rod to help kick start the circuit. The 2N3055 transistor still gets pretty hot, even with the diode and heatsink.

Thanks!