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Author Topic: Joule Lamp  (Read 293094 times)

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #150 on: June 20, 2012, 02:17:29 AM »
Merci beaucoup, Nerzh! 
 Like Lynx and you, I've built a bunch of these BO circuits also.  Fascinating.

Happy hunting to both of you!  pls keep reporting here if you would; too many threads are a tad hard to follow IMO.

On va voir s'il y a quelque chose d'interessant ici;  je pense que Oui.

(Again, my today's vid on this fun stuff is here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0WSrcWDy3c&feature=youtu.be )

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #150 on: June 20, 2012, 02:17:29 AM »

Offline NerzhDishual

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #151 on: June 20, 2012, 04:05:50 AM »

Hi Lynxsteam,

I do like:
.... they are amazing because they defy the things we have been taught. ....


Come on!
No transistor. No resistor. No Capacitor!
... A piece of tape.
... It is pretty remarkable/interesting.
You bet it is!

You should be kidding!
And you are not!

Who are you Mr LynxSteam?
Are you a kinda magician?
IMO, you deserve any "experimenter prize"!

For the moment I have to sleep...

Very best,
Jean

Offline NerzhDishual

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #152 on: June 20, 2012, 04:29:50 AM »

Hey Prof. S. Jones!

Your French is pretty good indeed!
How comes you learnt this silly language?

Very Best,
Jean

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #152 on: June 20, 2012, 04:29:50 AM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #153 on: June 20, 2012, 01:20:20 PM »
Wish I could speak French!

In regards to my "No Transistor" video.  I moved the base alum a bit and then couldn't replicate my own experiment.  I tried everything until I accidentally shorted the base to the collector.  Touching the Alum to the Zinc gave me enough continuity to start oscillation, but the major component was 12 volt DC.  Turns out that bulb will light with 12 vdc.  The AC component was vicious and burned my fingers even through the insulated wire. 
I am sure this is an area to explore but I believe in the end more components would be required and there is no need to make something simple a lot more difficult.

So then I went back to my original idea of using the small signal transistors - NPN type instead of the NPN power transistor.  They handle high frequency better.  Last night I paralleled two of them with very good results.  I also think having an aluminum plate at the end of a solenoidal coil is a bad idea due to eddy currents, so that mounting bracket is getting changed.

If you guys were replicating all my mistakes you would be getting irritated by now.  A couple more refinements and I will publish this updated LJL.

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #154 on: June 21, 2012, 05:11:26 PM »
      In my previous vid, I showed the Lynxsteam "cranberry" open-core and results of 107 Lumens/W.  Pretty good -- Lynx noted that there was an aluminum cover on the bottom of the coil holding the 2N3055 which could rob output power due to eddy currents in the aluminum.

     So today I removed this Al cover from the coil axis, placing it outside (along-side) the coil where the B field is small.  The result  shows an improvement in efficacy; primary tapped at winding 75, and I placed 2 ferrite rods in the air-core:

12.8 V  0.332A  ->  4.25W    463 Lumens (with 5 bulbs)   463/4.25 = 109 Lumens per Watt!

Congratulations once again, Lynxsteam!

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #154 on: June 21, 2012, 05:11:26 PM »
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Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #155 on: June 21, 2012, 05:50:38 PM »
 Be careful of the eyes!  One advantage of the light box I hadn't thought of before today -- I don't have to look at the bulbs at all; the lux-meter gives me a quantitative reading of the light output without my eyes getting zapped.

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #156 on: June 21, 2012, 10:08:30 PM »
  Talking about eyes getting zapped.  Last night I finally go my Exciter circuit to light up  the several CFL bulbs that I have.  So, I'm very glad to be having my eyes zapped in this case,  as it also means I'm looking at some good useable light intensity. 
  May have to wear sunglasses now...

  For my exciter circuit I placed two L3 coils that are wound on clear plastic tubes, that fit nicely one inside the other. It takes having two L3 coils, with my set up.  I also use a 1/2' toroid, as the "triger coil", a 2n2222 transistor, 1meg resistor, and In4148 diode.  The two L3 coil tubes are almost touching one another, but separated by the plastic tube. That may not be the best distance, for best results, if I separate the two tubes, I do get a slightly better output.
  So, now that that circuit is working, I'll connect it up to the solar cells, and be charging the 12volts, 4.5ah battery that is running the circuit. 
  I'll upload some pictures soon.
 
 

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #156 on: June 21, 2012, 10:08:30 PM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #157 on: June 21, 2012, 10:26:00 PM »
Joule Seeker,

Can you put in simple terms what the fantastic results you are seeing means?  For instance you are seeing more lumens per watt than the bulbs are specified to put out.  And we are inputting fewer watts than the bulbs would normally require.  What should someone expect from this type of DC converter?  Dim light and super efficiency, or good light at the same power draw as House grid?
As you report higher and higher lumens per watt it sounds really good, but we need some context or perspective.
For instance 109lumens per watt sounds good, but the bulbs are running with about half the watts they require.  Does that mean we need twice as many bulbs for useful light in a house?

Today, I made what I hope is the "definitive version" of the LynxJouleLamp.  It turned out very nice looking.  See schematic below.  It needs to be tested a lot before we publish the specifications.  I will send one to JouleSeeker for lumens testing.  Is there someone else that would like one for testing that isn't overseas?  I need someone to critique the look, feel, performance, ruggedness, safety.....Let me know here on the forum or PM me is fine too.




Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #158 on: June 22, 2012, 04:33:52 AM »
Here is the newest version of the LJL.  The changes were based on what Joule Seeker (Prof Jones) was finding out about lumens/watt, frequency and tuning.  Thank You Joule Seeker for your encouragement, ideas, and contributions to this area of work.  The design has come a long way from the original idea of a tesla coil based design.  Interestingly though a key aspect of making this work so well comes from Nikola Tesla's work.  And you can't beat the simplicity of Laser Saber's idea of a single reverse biased transistor.
I want to get this tested now and finalize the design.  Then I will publish the design for those wanting to build it, and for anyone around the world who finds it useful.  I will also make these for people not wanting to invest in spools of wire.  I am sure people will find better circuits and better ways to make this in the future, but this is pretty nice.

I didn't mention this in the video.  With 4 bulbs and on the high setting, frequency is 18 khz, on low setting 32 khz.

http://youtu.be/z1H9ckDS_pE

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #158 on: June 22, 2012, 04:33:52 AM »
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Offline Magluvin

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #159 on: June 22, 2012, 06:27:32 AM »
Hey All.  Nice work you guys.  I just gots to build one now.  ;] Over the weekend.

I have been reading here. might have missed some. But I got the drift.

The led bulbs. I assume that the input terminals go directly to a bridge rectifier and then a cap filter/storage in the bulb casing. Maybe a couple inductor/chokes along the way. Resistor/other circuitry?  I dont have one of these bulbs yet.

Has anyone tried to rectify the output of the coil to a cap to try looping? It "seems" that the LED light bulb is rectifying and storing. And the rectifiers in a device like these bulbs are probably not intended for the freq you guys are sending to the bulb terminals. Yet it works very efficiently. If no rectifiers to cap in the bulb, then, well, I dunno nuttin. ;]

Ill try some things. 

Thanks for all the good work.  ;]

Mags

Offline stprue

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #160 on: June 22, 2012, 01:31:44 PM »
Just a quick question, has anybody tried this setup using a pancake style coil?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #160 on: June 22, 2012, 01:31:44 PM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #161 on: June 22, 2012, 02:48:36 PM »
I have tried just about everything.  The pancake coil will give you very high voltage but when you load it, the oscillations often stop.  Doesn't mean it can't work with some more thought and effort.  I wasn't interested in lighting just one bulb so I moved on to designs that could handle larger loads. 

Imagine a machine that runs off energy stored in a flywheel.  If the flywheel is small you can only extract a little energy or it will stall.  If the flywheel is large you can pull a lot of energy out of it and it will keep turning with just short bursts of input energy. 

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #162 on: June 22, 2012, 04:26:48 PM »
  Lynxsteam -- I really like your approach of building these super-coils (your latest design) and making them available -- selling them!  I hope they sell like hot-cakes.  I'm very glad to do testing (and see response below to your questions).

We need some way to get these inventions out the door, and you're taking a marketing approach which I hope works well, very well.  There is nothing wrong IMHO with seeking a fair return on an invention! 

I have encouraged Slider to take his small device (small, one-led and different from yours) into production mode also -- based on your bold step here.  At least I think it is bold and great!

We have on these boards discussed the dangers associated with seeking a patent; but you're not doing that.

Joule Seeker,

Can you put in simple terms what the fantastic results you are seeing means?  For instance you are seeing more lumens per watt than the bulbs are specified to put out.  And we are inputting fewer watts than the bulbs would normally require.  What should someone expect from this type of DC converter?  Dim light and super efficiency, or good light at the same power draw as House grid?
As you report higher and higher lumens per watt it sounds really good, but we need some context or perspective.
For instance 109lumens per watt sounds good, but the bulbs are running with about half the watts they require.  Does that mean we need twice as many bulbs for useful light in a house?


Good questions; I wish I knew all the answers.   Yesterday with your "cranberry" air-core design (admittedly with added ferrite rods) I got 612 Lumens with 5.6 W input (5 bulbs, running at 12.8 V) -- which I think is amazing really.  The bulbs are designed for 1.5 W (each); this is running a little below that, 1.1 W each.

A 40-watt incandescent puts out about 500 Lumens, roughly 13 Lm/W, so 109 Lm/W is much better -- and 612 Lumens is quite bright.

Yes, we seem to be above the rated Lumens per watt typical for LED bulbs.  Two caveats:
1.  this particular bulb is from China and my experience is that they aren't careful in giving accurate lumens values (I've tested a dozen or so Chinese LED bulbs in my light box)
2.  Using Lumens out to estimate POWER-out is a start, but not a compelling result yet IMO.  For instance, it may be that at higher frequency and voltage, these bulbs exceed their rated Lm/W but without any ou-behavior involved.  I suspect that is the case.
So I would like to take the "next step" and actually measure the WATTS out from this device....  I'm working on it and would appreciate any ideas.
 
I would like to dump the AC power-out into a resistance-load, warm water, and measure the temp-rise.  Simple calorimeter approach.  If this loading does not itself change the circuit's efficiency!

As Mags says, it may be that the LED bulb first rectifies the AC input -- this is what I found when I disassembled a CFL bulb; but I haven't disassembled an LED bulb yet.   DC out makes it easier to measure Power out (IMO) -- so this is another approach to measuring P-out.

Thoughts?


Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #163 on: June 22, 2012, 05:10:43 PM »
Just to clarify, this will be "open source" information.  I am just going to offer ready made ones in case someone doesn't have the materials or finds that quantity minimums are too much $$$.  The 11# spools of copper I buy now are about $140 each, insulated wire is $79 a spool.  There is 450 feet of wire on the new model.

To measure power output is going to be very tricky.  Output changes according to load.  If you could get a resistive load like a heating element and adjust the Ohms until you get to the same hz as you would expect with the LED bulbs it might be accurate.  This is how we measure output of alternators at different rpm.  My guess is - there is very little energy lost in the DC-AC conversion.  So if you have 5 watts in at 95% that is 4.75 watts out, divided by 95 volts = 50 ma which is about right for LEDs.  I do think the frequency is like a "virtual amperage" in that the electrons impinge on the load with much more velocity. 

Sort of the difference between firing a bullet from a rifle vs dropping a bullet on your shoe.

Offline e2matrix

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #164 on: June 22, 2012, 05:12:12 PM »
Nice work guys!   I've just got a little info to add as I'm not sure how you are measuring Lumens.   I spent years on a forum that is very concerned with accurate measurement of lumen output.   What is not commonly understood is that you need more than just a light meter to get accurate measurement.   The only way to get accurate measurements is with an integrating sphere where the light is inside a sphere.  Measurements done any other way can easily be off by 50% or more.  I don't want to dampen any enthusiasm.  Seeing Lynxstreams vid I was impressed with the amount of light and I'm sure you are onto something good here.   Just be aware of the Lumen measurement situation though.  Integrating sphere's are very expensive but Google search DIY integrating sphere's and you'll find some ways to make your own for reasonable if it is really important to have those Lumens exact.

 

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