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Author Topic: Joule Lamp  (Read 293456 times)

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #135 on: June 18, 2012, 07:29:49 AM »
Peanutbutter asked a question over at EF -- may be helpful to post here, as this is where I plan to post on this subject in the future/  Here's my post over there, then:

@Peanutbutter -- you assumed incorrectly, but let me clarify:

Quote
Peanutbutter:

To first put aside the shown proven calibration variation (10-15Lu/w) between bulbs and just run with the above shown calibration (for all bulbs ever made), we end up with;

5480 Lux x [SIZE="4"].0793[/SIZE] = 434.5 Lumens (said 550)
434.5 Lumens / 6.018w = 72.2 Lu/W (said 95)

Above is using only Prof's conversion factor and Prof's shown numbers. This calibration was HIGHLY defended,[SIZE="4"] so I assume it's the same.[/SIZE] Again, we know calibration varies in favor of daylights; relative to warm white calibration with incandescent or compacts.


I have said (and further it seems rather obvious) that the calibration factor depends on the number of bulbs and will change when more bulbs are used.


Thus, the 0.0793 factor applies only for ONE bulb in this light box.  In the vid, I clearly say - and show inside the box - that FOUR bulbs are used!  so the calibration factor is NOT .0793 as you assumed.

I could leave it there, but you sort of asked, so I will note here that for four bulbs, I of course did the calibration, and the calibration factor for 4 bulbs in the positions shown is 0.103, so we have:

5480 Lux x 0.103 = 564 Lumens
564 Lumens / 6.018w = 94 Lu/W

I said 95 Lu/W because on run I did before making the vid, I had 5530 lux --> 570 Lumens, and
570 Lumens / 6.018w = 95 Lu/W (rounding).

Note that this small variation (94 or 95) is within the uncertainty (quite small) from run to run -- things are repeatable!  Again, that video is here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mz2osV3NRDQ&feature=youtu.be

Hope this helps!

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #135 on: June 18, 2012, 07:29:49 AM »

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #136 on: June 18, 2012, 02:21:00 PM »
I think what Nikola Tesla was trying to teach us 100 years ago is that work can be accomplished with "Brute Electrical Force"  amps x volts, or by a more elegant form - voltage x frequency.    Its hard for us to view things in a different way from what we have all been taught about watts being amps x volts.  Motors and resistive loads need watts, but light has a frequency component.

Joule Seeker - can you try another experiment with the Cranberry LJL aircore?  I really want to see if we can get the same astounding results on 12 volts.  I assume you were using the full 107 primary turns.  Can you try 75 turns primary and 12 - 12.8 volts?  That should provide the same step up factor.

Thanks

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #137 on: June 18, 2012, 07:46:12 PM »
  If the 12volt version of the Cranberry air-coil is made, Please give us at least an idea on what the wire lenghts are, wire guage, and dimension of the pvc tube its mounted on, and type,  so it can be easily replicated. And the best circuit used on it,so far.
 
  I just made the "6 garden light solar panel" set up like Hitman used on his videos,  And so I am working on that replication now.
  I'm still wondering how long the charge on his little 6 volt battery lasts under the load of the 10  2 watt Led bulbs.  Might only be a few minutes?

  I'm using a 12 volt 4.5 ah LAB, connected to 6 solar cells, and all connected to my version of the Slayer Exciter set up, so it's now becoming a 12 volt Solar JT Exciter.
Total voltage output from the small series connected solar panels, is 15 volts, 30 mAs, for now. Not much current, but my Exciter will run on that, and even lower current.
 I may have to add a couple more solar cells to that, to get higher current output.
  Just wanted to see if I can get close to Hitmans results, which to me are also pretty amazing.

 I would like to make the Cranberry air-core, also.  I'll make that project into an actual Joule Lamp, too, to connect that to my Exciter type system.  Why?
Because I feel that once a strong main Exciter Oscillator coil (like magnetmans Exciter made into a lamp) is set up and working well,  almost any amount of additional lights can be run off of it, on Av plugs from a one wire connection, to run almost any amount of lights needed. I'm thinking about a very high-gain field Exciter, running off of 24 volt,  solar.
To what degree one can just keep adding more lights, is still to be seen. Maybe adding more lights will also work here, as it's seen that adding more leds can increases the light intensity on the Exciter circuits, as well. As the load is part of the "open" circuit pulling in ambient energies. But, possibly without the 5 to 10 bulb limit, that the direct wired closed connection to the oscillators transistor seems to be limited to.
 
  So,  the air-core has been having the best results? Even over those that were obtained from the E-cores, the 110-220v to 12v  iron transformers, and lastly the toroid air core???
   The cranberry air-core is the up to now all time output lm/w winner???  Great!

  Let me know if I got this all backwards, as my head is still spinning from watching all the different tests you are all doing, as well as others that are all going on now.
                                                                   
  NickZ

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #137 on: June 18, 2012, 07:46:12 PM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #138 on: June 18, 2012, 10:52:08 PM »
Since making the "Cranberry" LJL  I made some improvements that dropped amp draw 8% more on the "Licorice" model.  So if I detailed the specs and materials today they might change tomorrow.  As Joule Seeker records data we now are learning more about what changes cause what effects.
 
The Cranberry uses 736 turns on the secondary of 20 awg Essex magnet wire.  The primary is opposite wound 14 awg red insulated stranded wiring like you would use in a house, and full length is 107 turns.  Its on a 1- 1/2" PVC 14" long, using 13" of the PVC for the turns.  It uses just the 2N3055 as in Laser Saber's JR2.0.
It could be that more turns of 24 awg magnet wire would be better.  There are some insulating properties I am working through, and matching to the most efficient bulbs will take a bit more time.

But if you want to get started those are the main ingredients and you could start tweaking things yourself.
Keep in mind a couple weeks ago I was using 2.4 amps, and as I have made changes have it down to 1.21 amps for six 7.5 watt bulbs.  Joule Seeker's addition of the ferrite rod was the big breakthrough.  It allows the aircore to still act like an aircore but with nice efficiency.

It could be a smaller or bigger diameter PVC tube would be better.  Various shapes of ferrite might be better.  Could be that longer or shorter is better.  Rather than replicating you may want to try something a little different and find a better way to do this.

As is, this is a simple and convenient way to light a couple rooms with solar and a 12 volt battery.  It starts nice and is very robust.  The original size that was posted here originally is one of my best.  I think it is modified with 1360 turns and 150 turns. 

What some experimenters are doing is to find the highest efficiency which is important work, but not essential for lighting a few rooms right now.  Considering that solar is free, if your system is a little less efficient, so what?  Sometimes a solar controller just shunts power away to a dump load because the battery is full.  Any solar energy impinging on earth is here whether we use it or not.

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #139 on: June 19, 2012, 01:03:30 AM »
  Thank you for all that info... I will refer to it, when making the Cranberry, although I may have to name mine something like the "Mango Version", or something like that.
Here's a picture of someone that needs light in his hut, (picture below). No noddle pack.

   Today I'm noticing that while trying to make some light by using the recycled CFL's indoor lamp light. Which is being pick-up by my 6 garden light solar cells indoors.
 Although that does work, the 13 watt Cfl's grid source light output is still rather weak. As that CFL light hitting a small garden light solar panel, of that artificial light coming from a Cfl bulb is less than a 1/10 as useful ( 2 mAs) in producing current through solar cells. Compared to the natural sunlight which gives 30 mA on each of my little cells, (compared to only 2mA) that is picked up from the 13 watt CFL bulb. with the bulb right on top of the cell, almost touching the solar cell. Imagine the light intensity several feet away.
  I can see the deficiencies that living under mostly CFL, or even Leds, can cause.  As the light from Cfls and possibly leds is not of a warmer full spectrum current carrying type, like sunlight is.   Led light is are more like,  moonlight.

  So, it may not just be about the volts and watts, and "frequency" in these circuits.  There may also be another one of those allusive little things hidden in there, to have to look into to understand.

  I think that to messure led bulb light intensity at a DISTANCE, is very important (6 to 8 feet away). As that kind of artificial Led light has a brightness intesity loss factor,  (with distance from the source), that is different and much more pronounced than found when using  incandescent bulbs.  So, for a truer comparison of Led to incandescent bulbs outputs, comparing their  "light quality"  not just light intensity, especially at "useable distances from their source", like 6 to 8 feet, would also be useful.   
The golden light that the  incandescent bulbs produce, seams to go further away from the source, to light up a room with an even, warm pleasant spread out,  kind of fire light quality to it.   Yes, I still love it...
   Now the warm white/cool white led bulbs are getting closer to natural sunlight, but are they?  What about the quality of the light from the different led bulbs tested, any favorites???    Like, what is also the  "Best Quality" light, for the buck?  Not only just the brightest, that may be so bright you can't even look at it....     It was so bright, but, no one could stand it...    Dimmers?

   NickZ

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #139 on: June 19, 2012, 01:03:30 AM »
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Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #140 on: June 19, 2012, 02:08:19 AM »
  Lynx:
  Before I forget.  After I saw the toroid that you just made, I got to thinking... what would that core do if it was all packed tight with ferrite powder???
  You can take the ferrite cores, like from the back of old tv tubes, or monitors, and bang them to a powder with a hammer, sift it, and fill your tube with it.  What do you think?
Big ferrite toroid. I'll bet that it would work better than the hollow air core.
  There seam to be no getting away from the bigger is better, when it comes to these cores.
  Any ways, just thought that I'd let you know about that thought that came to me... before I forget it.
 
 

Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #141 on: June 19, 2012, 05:59:46 AM »
Thanks to Lynxsteam once again for a great idea --

  Nice progress this morning -- but I had trouble posting here this morning;
 see vid -- here's the text:

 Using the Lynxsteam build of the Lasersaber 2.0 SJR again...  Lynx asked me to tap the primary at winding 75 (instead of going to the end) AND to lower the voltage to 12.8 V, so that we would be able to run this with a standard 12V battery.  I did so -- congratulations Lynxsteam -- this now surpasses 100 Lumens per watt!
 
 The data recorded on this vid show:  385 mA @12.8V = 4.9W (input).  The output is 493 x 10 = 4930 Lux.
 The calibration factor (to lumens) is 0.103, so we have 4930 X 0.103 = 508 Lumens.
Thus, 508 Lm/4.9W = 104 Lm/W -- excellent progress!
 
 Note:  at 12.0 V, I found 102 Lm/W.   Note 2: at 12.8V, without the ferrite rod, I found 75 Lumens per watt -- 104 Lm/W with the ferrite rod. It makes a big difference!
 
 vid:  104LmPerWatt.AVI - YouTube
 
Thanks for further ideas, Lynx and Nick.  Lots to try out as we press forward.

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #141 on: June 19, 2012, 05:59:46 AM »
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Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #142 on: June 19, 2012, 03:24:09 PM »
Thank you Joule Seeker for your continued efforts on this device.  I think we have shown now that it is possible to make this with simple found objects as well as optimizing the design with precision.  Still a person needs the transistor, specialty wire, and the right shaped ferrite.  What we have achieved here is a blocking oscillator DC converter that doesn't ring, doesn't saturate at high frequency, and is fairly efficient with a single or multiple bulbs.  Seems pretty flexible to use with varying voltages and bulb types.

A couple ideas, I don't know how plausible.  There is something called a magnetic reactance transformer that doesn't use a transistor to oscillate, but I don't know if it applies.  Common black ceramic hardware magnets can be heated in an oven to 850 F slowly to demagnetize.  And just about any insulated wire will work.

A couple of comments.  Filling a torroid wound aircore with ferrite would be tedious and would be better to just use a manufactured torroid.  Stacking torroids on an aircore probably is mixing two very different mechanisms.  Torroids contain the field tightly inside.  Aircores need to have the field intersect at 90 degrees to the wire.

I have been picturing High Frequency movement of electrons.  An analogy would be to picture two tubes with tin foil covering the ends.  One has four small ball bearings inside, the other has 100 of the same ball bearing.  Shake both back and forth simulating AC.  The one with just four ball bearings shake back and forth hard and fast simulating high voltage and high frequency.  The one with 100 just roll back and forth slowly simulating 60 Hz and lower voltage.  The tin foil will be broken through in a short time by both methods representing work being done.  If electrons have mass, then mass times velocity would equal force.   Work is force times distance/time. 

In the case of these light bulbs we are using very little current at high voltage and high frequency.  The bulbs will run much cooler than if they are run off grid power, and that translates to energy savings and higher efficiency.

Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #143 on: June 19, 2012, 06:05:53 PM »
  Yes, it may be a bit tedious to fill the hose or pvc pipe with ferrite powder, but it would work.  It would only take a few minutes to do.  As there may be no way of having a 14 inch ferrite rod 1/ 1/2 inch wide to fit into the PVC pipe, or hose.  Nor are there any 8 or 10 inch torroids that I know of.  The metglass ones cost $660.
 
  I guess that I'm used to crushing things like quarts, carbon, and other things for my power cells.  The ferrite can be obtained from any tv repair place, probably even for free.
When I'm ready to make the Mango version, I'll fill it up with ferrite, in the way that I mentioned.  Yes, it would be easier to buy the ferrite, but, can you?  I'll check on that too.
Anyway, it's just an idea.
 

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #143 on: June 19, 2012, 06:05:53 PM »
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Offline NickZ

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #144 on: June 19, 2012, 06:07:29 PM »
  Congrats on the 104 lm/w guys.  That's just great!

Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #145 on: June 19, 2012, 09:51:23 PM »
Nick-Z

Where the heck do you live?  Beautiful beach and a Sloth for a neighbor?  I live on a lake and a few neighbors are Sloths (different kind)

So, today I am trying a homemade transistor of sorts, made from galvanized steel, aluminum, some wire.  Its really just a negative resistance oscillator.  Kind of silly, because a person would still need a battery, wire and LED or CFL bulbs.  Can't really make lightbulbs too easily.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #145 on: June 19, 2012, 09:51:23 PM »
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Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #146 on: June 20, 2012, 12:14:47 AM »
Good ideas, fellas.  Here's a summary of experimental runs today; first a reminder from yesterday (where we enjoyed a big jump up in Lumens/Watt):

4 bulbs, tapping at winding 75 on the primary:
12.8V   385 mA   4.9W    Output: 508 Lm 104 Lm/W

 
Today, following suggestion from Lynxsteam, I tap the primary at other windings; winding 73 result:

12.8V   409 mA   5.2W    Output: 539 Lm 104 Lm/W: same Lm/W as winding 75

 
Tapping at winding 70 instead,
12.8V   458 mA   5.9W    Output: 597 Lm 102 Lm/W  : so light out increases, but Pin increases more and the efficacy drops a bit.

 
Add a 4700pF cap in parallel across the bulbs, tap at 75th winding:
12.8V   536 mA   6.9W    Output: 686 Lm,   96 Lm/W :  Lm/W decreases with added cap in this case.

 
Raising ferrite rod from bottom of PVC to supported in the middle raised the yield to about 105 Lm/W (winding 75).
I tried 12.3V; power in and out both drop, as expected; Lm/W = efficacy drops a little:
12.3V   325 mA   4.0W    Output: 412 Lm ;    103 Lm/W

 
 I tried adding a bulb, so 5 in lieu of 4 bulbs:
12.8V   436 mA   5.6W    Output: 591 Lm 106 Lm/W  – so output light increases and Lm/W up with the 5th LED bulb. 

Add a second ferrite rod, this time the yield increased (with 5 bulbs and at 74th winding):
12.8V   304 mA   3.9W    Output: 416 Lm 107 Lm/W.

Note that the input-power drops along with total light output, but the efficacy increases.
Pause to note that the Utilitech 7.5W bulb (110VAC) puts out 450 lumens, about 60 Lm/W.


 
One more test – tap into 80th winding on the primary, but with same 5 bulbs and 2 ferrite rods in place:
12.8V   303 mA   3.9W    Output: 397 Lm 102 Lm/W

 
So we find an incremental but solid increase from yesterday's 104 Lm/W, to 107 Lm/W with the 5th bulb and 2 ferrite rods.

 
It would be great IMO to get above 110 Lm/W.  Lynx has talked about winding a new coil, smaller or larger. Changing the core would also be good;  having the ferrite core go into a complete LOOP would be great to try!  Lots of ferrite... or metglass (etc)

Or somehow getting back to the resonance nature of the Tesla coil...  that would be great...
I would also like to find a way to RELIABLY measure the actual OUTPUT POWER, to compare with the input power.   The trick is measuring the output power in the case of high voltage and fairly high frequency (around 15-40 kHz typical; I don't usually leave the DSO hooked up since this could affect the measurements).    Measuring Lumens-out is a start, but IMHO not quite enough for the inquiring mind.


 
All in all, 107 Lumens/Watt with a simple system, running off 12.8VDC, is pretty good! 
 


Offline NerzhDishual

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #147 on: June 20, 2012, 12:38:16 AM »
Hi Joules Looters,

Sorry if this is a little bit off topic.

I have successfully built/replicated  the "Slayer exciter circuit test" (see picture).
BTW: thanks to 'Slayer*' for his CCT.

I use a small 4.5 volts bat and one (or 2 (for the moment)) 6 watts fluorescent tube(s).

It works with (more than 30 years old out off my mess) 2N1613 or 2N1711 transistors,
so, this 2N2219 is not 'redhibitory'.

My L1 should have about (600-650) turns of #30 (0.25 mm) wire on a 2.5 cm ((one inch) diameter tube) - length 17.5 cm.
My L2 have 3/3.5? turns of #15/16/17? insulated wire.
Why not 4 turns or more? Just because I (purposely) used this 'trashed/refused' wire (plijout a ra din c'hoari a-wechoù).
 
It draws 100 ma (under the said 4.5 volts).
The transistor does not get hot at all.
I had to add a 4.7K pot. to the 1K resistor to get the circuit working each time
I switch it on. :) ) It was not the case with a single 1K resistor.

Now, I will order a bunch of these small 4 and 6 watts fluorescent tubes just to figure out
how many of these tubes I can "connect" on this amazing CCT.
-----------------
This post is not intended to provoke some diversion but to tell you that, IMO, all these kinda
CCTs seem to be very 'flexible'. It looks like we do not need to too accurately follow the specifications.
This consideration is not intended also to lessen the merits of the inventors (Slayer/Lynx/???/Etc...)
For my part, I would not have been able to even dare to think about such circuits!
However, I dared to walk on fire! (BTW: It works for anybody).
 
Bien le bonjour chez vous,
Jean


Offline Lynxsteam

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #148 on: June 20, 2012, 01:50:59 AM »
Jean,

Nice!  I have built a lot of Joule Thief circuits and they are amazing because they defy the things we have been taught.  Lots of fun and useful.  Keep experimenting, its good for the brain.

Since you changed the subject so will I.

How about a 3 watt LED on 44 ma 12 volts no transistor, no resistor, no capacitor.  Some wire, a stick or plastic tube, some scrap metal.  Hmm?

I was surfing the web looking for some ideas and stumbled on http://www.sparkbangbuzz.com/els/zincosc-el.htm

I didn't put this in the circuit the way he does.  I wanted to fit the concept into the reversed biased HV circuit and light LED bulbs.  He doesn't use the aluminum with the galvanized as a NPN bipolar combo, but definitely this website inspired me to try making my own scrap metal oscillator.  Whatdyaknow - it works.  Next up is to refine this, and incorporate it as part of the LJL build.  I am thinking of wrapping a strip of aluminum around the aircore tube, then tape, then the treated galvanized, then tape and then a strip for the emitter.
See the video below, I think you will be amazed as I was.  This is how the early experimenters were proceeding in the 1920's with the blocking oscillator circuits.  I am learning so much more from 100 year old technology.  Its amazing when you start seeing!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHWMeF5ybCg


Offline JouleSeeker

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Re: Joule Lamp
« Reply #149 on: June 20, 2012, 02:09:49 AM »
  I decided to try out the E-core-based Lasersaber SJR 2.0, with the SAME FIVE BULBS as used in the air-core-based tests above.

Results in this vid -- sorry its dark...  I will get more light on the subject next time!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0WSrcWDy3c&feature=youtu.be

Text:
Quote
  Today I test with 5 LED bulbs and my build of the Lasersaber SJR 2.0 device.  I wound the E-cores with approx. a 10:1 ratio for the secondary:primary.  Here I push to 23 VDC input, and measure (real-time) the current drawn and the light output.

  The current is 237mA @ 23 V = 5.45W.  The light output is 4750 Lux and to get lumens we multiply lux by 0.111 for five bulbs (box previously calibrated using American-rated bulbs).  The result is 4750 x 0.111 = 527 Lumens, so 527/5.45 = 97 Lumens per watt.   Note that this result is close to the 98 Lm/W that PeanutButter got with his (transformer-based) build yesterday IIRC.

Good progress!  but:  1 -- running at 23V like this blew the 2N3055 transistor -- dead.  I was concerned I blew out the bulbs, but the bulbs tested OK after I replaced the 2N3055.

2.  Also, I did somewhat better with the air-core Lynxsteam approach on the same Lasersaber circuit -- 104 Lm/Watt yesterday (see my previous video) -- and 107 Lm/W today (at 416 Lumens, with the SAME five bulbs and the same circuit -- just changed the cores).  Note that I inserted one ferrite core in the air-core to get to 104 Lm/W, and two ferrite cores to get 107 Lm/W today.  I have also run at 591 Lumens (@106Lm/W) with the air-core plus ferrite; for further discussion please see:  http://www.overunity.com/12340/joule-lamp/new/#new .

IMHO, these approaches are worth further study and the light-box is very helpful in quantifying the light output so that one can make comparisons -- and progress!
Happy experimenting!

 

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