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Mechanical free energy devices => mechanic => Topic started by: Low-Q on September 30, 2011, 12:30:57 PM

Title: Will fast spinning objects levitate?
Post by: Low-Q on September 30, 2011, 12:30:57 PM
Hi all,

I am in the "Coriolis mood", and have had some thoughts about how the Coriolis effect forces water to create a vortex as it drains out of the sink.
What would happen if the water (hypotetically) drains out UPWARDS? Would the rotation reverse?

So the main question:
If an object starts to rotate when it falls down towards the ground, would it then be possible to raise, or levitate, an object if its spun very fast in the opposite direction?

Vidar
Title: Re: Will fast spinning objects levitate?
Post by: energia9 on September 30, 2011, 02:23:02 PM
Hi all,

I am in the "Coriolis mood", and have had some thoughts about how the Coriolis effect forces water to create a vortex as it drains out of the sink.
What would happen if the water (hypotetically) drains out UPWARDS? Would the rotation reverse?

So the main question:
If an object starts to rotate when it falls down towards the ground, would it then be possible to raise, or levitate, an object if its spun very fast in the opposite direction?

Vidar

the question will fast spinning objects levitate is true.
but it needs to overcome the speed of earths rotation times its diameter
earth is 12756km in diameter, and so it spins around its axis at 24 hr a cycle   
if you half the earths diameter which is 6378km , then if it would have the same orientation as of earth, the rotation per full cycle would be 12hr

now calculate the rotation needed for a 1 meter device

as i have read from inventors you can actually calculate out how much mass and diameter x rotation you need for a rotating device
BUT the law of levitation is not the same on all occasions, 
have a read at this: 
http://www.rexresearch.com/hollingshead/hollingshead.htm
Title: Re: Will fast spinning objects levitate?
Post by: Low-Q on September 30, 2011, 02:45:45 PM
the question will fast spinning objects levitate is true.
but it needs to overcome the speed of earths rotation times its diameter
earth is 12756km in diameter, and so it spins around its axis at 24 hr a cycle   
if you half the earths diameter which is 6378km , then if it would have the same orientation as of earth, the rotation per full cycle would be 12hr

now calculate the rotation needed for a 1 meter device

as i have read from inventors you can actually calculate out how much mass and diameter x rotation you need for a rotating device
BUT the law of levitation is not the same on all occasions, 
have a read at this: 
http://www.rexresearch.com/hollingshead/hollingshead.htm
That would be not more than 8864.58 RPM. Can that be true?
What happens if you reverse the rotation? Will the object be twice as heavy?

Vidar
Title: Re: Will fast spinning objects levitate?
Post by: energia9 on September 30, 2011, 03:03:27 PM
That would be not more than 8864.58 RPM. Can that be true?
What happens if you reverse the rotation? Will the object be twice as heavy?

Vidar
a good question you have, but if you would put a rotating fluid upside down it would be hard to retain its wanted orientation because the vortex would collapse with gravity pull
mass tries to gather to the bigger masses (earth)
atoms attract atoms, the bigger it is the heavier it is, the bigger the gravitational field

One of the effects of mass is that it attracts other mass. For small objects, like your computer, your car, and even a building, the force of gravity is tiny. But when you have millions, and even trillions of tonnes of mass, the effect of the gravity really builds up. All of the mass pulls on all the other mass, and it tries to create the most efficient shape… a sphere.

For smaller objects, like asteroids, the force of gravity trying to pull the object into a sphere isn’t enough to overcome the strength of the rock keeping it in shape. But once you get above a certain mass and size, the strength of the object can’t stop the force of gravity from pulling it into a sphere. Objects larger than about 1,000 km in size are able to pull themselves into a sphere.

Title: Re: Will fast spinning objects levitate?
Post by: lumen on September 30, 2011, 08:27:47 PM
Here is a concept!
We all held a bicycle wheel on one end of the shaft and gave it a spin watching the other end float, seemingly to defy gravity, and also noticed how the other end would in fact lift or fall if the spinning wheel was forced to turn against the spinning axis. Then we quickly understood that all the weight was instead transferred to the end you were holding.

 In the picture below, suppose you had a very strong but light weight disk with smaller heavy rotors attached at 45 degree angles. Spinning the disk would cause the rotors to fly to the outside as the centrifugal force became as strong as gravity. If the rotors were held from rotating further than 45 degrees and the disk speed was further increased, then the centrifugal force would be several times stronger than gravity even though the entire spinning device still weights the same.

NOW, applying energy to rotate the small rotors while they are changing angular position rapidly will cause the inner side of the wheel to attempt to rotate downward, but this is fought by the main acting force, centrifugal force. and cannot rotate down so the outer edge is raised upward.

In the end, energy applied to the small rotors, causes lift as the rotors work against the centrifugal force and convert some of this force to an upward lift.

 :o :o :o 
Title: Re: Will fast spinning objects levitate?
Post by: Low-Q on October 01, 2011, 08:56:16 AM
So you must apply additional energy to lift the disc anyway, right?

Vidar