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Author Topic: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect  (Read 885094 times)

synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #720 on: March 19, 2013, 09:49:08 PM »
Conradelectro,
 
Then it would run off a single Reed switch in series with the power coils and the battery. That's the beauty of the bifilar, it's ambivilant. Of course it would kill it if you tried to run it with magnets in the power coils. The loads would work like Skycollection's rectifier LEDS on the magnet filled output coils.

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #721 on: March 19, 2013, 09:53:50 PM »
Yes very nice platform, what's your maximum rotor speed and the maximum corresponding input ?

@synchro

I don't have a scope yet :( I use cheap USB sound sticks plus that soundcard oscilloscope software.

Luckily i've just landed some good work so hope to get a proper scope next month.

But i've ordered the parts i need to explore the tube magnet as a core idea.


All the best,

DC.


synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #722 on: March 19, 2013, 09:57:29 PM »
Yes very nice platform, what's your maximum rotor speed and the maximum corresponding input ?

@synchro

I don't have a scope yet :( I use cheap USB sound sticks plus that soundcard oscilloscope software.

Luckily i've just landed some good work so hope to get a proper scope next month.

But i've ordered the parts i need to explore the tube magnet as a core idea.
 



All the best,

DC.

Thanks, a replication even with your modest digital testing equipment is more then I can supply.

conradelektro

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #723 on: March 19, 2013, 10:03:29 PM »
Then it would run off a single Reed switch in series with the power coils and the battery. That's the beauty of the bifilar, it's ambivilant. Of course it would kill it if you tried to run it with magnets in the power coils. The loads would work like Skycollection's rectifier LEDS on the magnet filled output coils.

I have to think about this and do some tests. I did not know that a Tesla-Bifilar is independent of the polarity of a passing magnet.

I always dislike reed switches, they do not work very long (1 or 10 Million switch actions at the most, depending on quality)? And I think that the switching frequency is limited to about 1 KHz.

There are reed switches which work with both poles and some which only react to one pole. I have "closers" which react to both magnetic poles. They would be right.

In case alternating poles are absolutely necessary one would have to use a second disc. One disk (with all magnets in the same direction) for driving and a second disk (with alternating magnet poles) for generating power with synchro1 coils.

Or one drives the generator disk with an ordinary DC motor (but it has a low efficiency of 60%).

Greetings, Conrad

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #724 on: March 19, 2013, 10:09:30 PM »
My pleasure sync :)

I don't think a bifilar coil is independent, polewise, in that sense it's just like a normal coil, all the wire wound in the same direction, so you couldn't have a bifilar drive coil that would drive N and S magnets.

e2a :

watch the OUG videos on my channel :

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4CUJ-q-dXiRjiUaoaM_ReAtmGyM2Ic1q


atb,

DC.

conradelektro

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #725 on: March 19, 2013, 10:14:34 PM »
Yes very nice platform, what's your maximum rotor speed and the maximum corresponding input ?
All the best,

DC.

My design was an exercise in low power consumption, therefore the drive coils have a high DC resistance (very many turns with thin wire, coils from relays).

The highest turn rate with a 9 Volt battery is about 800 rpm (revolutions per minute). With a 2.2 Volt battery it just turnes slowly.

See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEEjlYvZ5OM

For a test of the "delayed Lenz effect" I would of course need coils with much less turns (and stronger wire) and it will need some Watts to turn a bigger rotor very fast (e.g. at 5000 rpm). This will also need a more careful mechanical layout.

And that is the reason why I will probably never build it. My skills in mechanics are rather low. I have some bearings from bigger old hard disk drives which could be used. Ballancing the rotor (to avoid vibrations) is difficult but very important at high rpm.

Greetings, Conrad

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #726 on: March 19, 2013, 10:22:42 PM »
One more thing Conrad, i switched from an inductive drive coil to a DC motor (for my multi-magnet rotor) and got better results, but it is a good motor, here on ebay in the UK :

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12v-DC-electric-motor-UK-SELLER-/110739940158?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item19c89d633e

An easy way to see AUL is to get a diametric magnet and spin it with one of your drive coils, mine gets up to 40,000 RPM so is really good for seeing the effect in a single coil, i stuck mine on a carbon rod axle and used miniature flanged bearings sunk into holes in the perspex supports :

http://www.mediafire.com/view/?ix12bdfu0ypv1e2

I'm working on a coil that makes the rotor go faster than when there is no coil/core assembly present.


atb,

DC.










synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #727 on: March 19, 2013, 10:25:15 PM »
Deepcut,
 
A single wrap directional coil has an ingrained pole, unlike the bifilar series wraped. The rotor magnet polarity determines the pole in the bifilar. Where did you buy those flange bearings?

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #728 on: March 19, 2013, 10:29:33 PM »
Conrad, for acceleration-under-load (AUL) you need lots of turns (the way i do it), but the important thing is the time constant of the coil.

Watch the OUG videos i linked to on my channel, he explains it all.

You can easily build a good rotor, mine are just cheap bearings plus a threaded brass rod with nuts and washers, all off ebay and not hugely costly. My mechanical skilss probably aren't much better than yours.

Do watch the OUG videos and my videos that show AUL in different devices.

This is all i've been doing since 2010 and i love talking about it/answering any questions that i can and wil gladly help you get something off the ground (not that i have antigravity yet !).

Also, check my long post earlier where i posted my programs and spreadsheets that help with design.


atb,

DC.

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #729 on: March 19, 2013, 10:31:47 PM »
A single wrap directional coil has an ingrained pole, unlike the bifilar series wraped. The rotor magnet polarity determines the pole in the bifilar.

I can't see how that is so, unless you have the two halves of the coil going in opposite directions ?

The induced pole in a coil depends on its winding direction and the magnet passing it (i know i don't need to tell you this i am just saying it for clarity).


atb,

DC.

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #730 on: March 19, 2013, 10:33:51 PM »
i got the bearings from here, not from ebay as i said earlier now i think of it :

http://www.smbbearings.com/Framesets/Flanged_metric_frame.htm


atb,

DC.




synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #731 on: March 19, 2013, 10:35:48 PM »
I can't see how that is so, unless you have the two halves of the coil going in opposite directions ?

The induced pole in a coil depends on its winding direction and the magnet passing it (i know i don't need to tell you this i am just saying it for clarity).


atb,

DC.

The winding directions cancel one another out in the bifilar series wrap.

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #732 on: March 19, 2013, 10:37:46 PM »
So you wind one wire in one direction and the other in the opposite direction ?

btw i found miniature flanged bearings on ebay UK, what country are you in ?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=miniature+flanged+bearings&rt=nc&LH_BIN=1


DC.


synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #733 on: March 19, 2013, 10:41:16 PM »
So you wind one wire in one direction and the other in the opposite direction ?

btw i found miniature flanged bearings on ebay UK, what country are you in ?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=miniature+flanged+bearings&rt=nc&LH_BIN=1


DC.

When you attach The opposite ends of the bifilar, the current runs in opposite directions in the coil, that's why it has zero inductance. Right now I'm in Costa Rica. Thanks for the hyperlink.

DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #734 on: March 19, 2013, 10:42:41 PM »
Damn !

I've been using nothing but bifilar-serial and i didn't even think of that property, that's really cool :)


DC.