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Author Topic: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect  (Read 779580 times)

Offline gyulasun

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #630 on: March 02, 2013, 04:25:36 PM »
And they have the Internal split field generator as well:

http://www.google.com/patents/US8089188

Gyula

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #631 on: March 02, 2013, 04:40:50 PM »
And they have the Internal split field generator as well:

http://www.google.com/patents/US8089188

Gyula

I see your points. That's what caused me to replicate Leon Dragone's solid state generator. I made videos of it. Dragone patented the Magnet pump Generator. Two disk magnets on each end of a core winding. The field oscillation inside the magnet core output coil accounts for a good share of the abundant amperage. All the time, the slowed pole shift from very powerful magnet core field interference, motors the prime mover like a pulse coil. The power agitated by the spinner hepls drive the rotor magnet with greater force. Three great advantages in one!
« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 07:21:49 PM by synchro1 »

Offline garrypm

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #632 on: March 02, 2013, 09:06:52 PM »
Are not, both those patents, very close, if not, a direct description on Willis' comments on dragons den of his magnacoaster !!!!!
 
Garry

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #633 on: March 03, 2013, 04:09:20 PM »
I built a Cook battery. I filled 8" of electrical conduit with 8 1/2" diamectric tube magnets and wraped it with first 1 layer of 32 gauge magnet wire, then one layer of household 16 gauge. This bifilar was then series wired Tesla style.. A capacitor and Schottky diode were wired in series. A spontaneous charge built in the capacitor untill it reached a ceiling level.
 
I held the cook battery up to a large rotating 3/4" diametric neo tube spinner, to see how the cap charged, and Lo and behold! The spinner took off like crazy and peaked the cap charge. I then simply scaled the Cook battery down to the 28 guage 2 magnet core design That went O.U.
 
I want to stress that theory followed results, not vica versa. As of now I can explain the effect in simple terms we have grown familiar with through the course of our intrest in the "Thane Hien's" effect. I think nearly all of us are prepared to fully understand what this is in Mandrian:
 
"Diametric magnet core bifilar output coil, PM field induced Lenz delay pole shift interferance lag retro-pulse propulsion" as a principle of electromagnetic physics both here and at home in China..
.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2013, 06:49:45 PM by synchro1 »

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #634 on: March 03, 2013, 07:46:13 PM »
How's this one?
 
             "Linear Tesla output coil Lenz poleshift retarding permanent diametric magnet core, retro pulse propulsion overunity."
 
At first I thought the magnet coil generated current. I ended up understanding how "Entropy" was doubling back to re-emerge in it's mirror image as a power mover..
 
Speeding the rotor up to 25k goes past the threshold, but any output is too hgh in voltage to self loop. Dampening the pole shift with diametric magnet cores, brings the rotor speed down enough to charge a 12 volt run battery off a rectifier. Measured around 20 volts. The strong magnet cores kill the coil efficency off by a good 95%.! The output coil needs a load to generate Lenz delay propulsion. The rotor winds down when the output hot lead is disconnected from the run battery as a load!
« Last Edit: March 03, 2013, 09:48:11 PM by synchro1 »

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #635 on: March 03, 2013, 10:40:39 PM »
Synchro1:

Quote
That went O.U.

I am not sure if you have have discussed your setups and associated clips on the forum but it would be prudent to do so.  You make a couple of references t your setups giving you over unity without ever questioning the results or trying alternative measurements.  For example, I think that you mentioned that your current measurement went to zero when one of your rotors doubled its RPM.  Since you are talking about very high RPM speeds, it very possible that the AC current was too high in frequency for your meter to measure properly.  Therefore the meter showed zero current simply because it was unable to measure the signal.

Quote
Linear Tesla output coil Lenz poleshift retarding permanent diametric magnet core, retro pulse propulsion overunity.

I have a challenge for you.  Take your setup and assuming that you have an oscilloscope measure the all of the voltages and currents associated with your setup, both on the input side and the output side.  Take scope shots or even better construct a timing diagram on paper, and then explain the voltage and current waveforms and and the timing relationships between them and relate the measurements back to your setup.

For example, when you make a change to your setup the current consumption might drop and the RPM might increase.  So what is really happening here?  If you understand all of the voltages and currents in the setup before you make the change, and then go through the whole process of understanding the voltages and currents after you make the change, you should be able to figure out exactly why the rotor speeds up.

In other words, you need to make the leap from observing a change in your setup and theorizing the reason for the change, to actually making all of the measurements and actually explaining why the change happened.  It's not easy and it's hard work.  But at the end of the day you get the satisfaction of truly understanding what you are observing and being able to explain it to your peers.

MileHigh

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #636 on: March 04, 2013, 01:05:08 AM »
Synchro1:

I am not sure if you have have discussed your setups and associated clips on the forum but it would be prudent to do so.  You make a couple of references t your setups giving you over unity without ever questioning the results or trying alternative measurements.  For example, I think that you mentioned that your current measurement went to zero when one of your rotors doubled its RPM.  Since you are talking about very high RPM speeds, it very possible that the AC current was too high in frequency for your meter to measure properly.  Therefore the meter showed zero current simply because it was unable to measure the signal.

I have a challenge for you.  Take your setup and assuming that you have an oscilloscope measure the all of the voltages and currents associated with your setup, both on the input side and the output side.  Take scope shots or even better construct a timing diagram on paper, and then explain the voltage and current waveforms and and the timing relationships between them and relate the measurements back to your setup.

For example, when you make a change to your setup the current consumption might drop and the RPM might increase.  So what is really happening here?  If you understand all of the voltages and currents in the setup before you make the change, and then go through the whole process of understanding the voltages and currents after you make the change, you should be able to figure out exactly why the rotor speeds up.

In other words, you need to make the leap from observing a change in your setup and theorizing the reason for the change, to actually making all of the measurements and actually explaining why the change happened.  It's not easy and it's hard work.  But at the end of the day you get the satisfaction of truly understanding what you are observing and being able to explain it to your peers.

MileHigh

You sure cut a pile of work out for me. How about you trying it? I don't have access to that kind of equipment. It would help if JLN labs tried it for us. Maybe I'll email Jean Louis and ask him if he would subject a replication to strict standards of scientific scrutiny.

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #637 on: March 04, 2013, 01:48:57 AM »
@MileHigh,
 
 
I just finished emailing JLN a hyperlink to the thread. Jean Louis has been kind enough to reply to my email in the past. He's currently set up to run this kind of experiment. Maybe he can help Leapfrog this discovery to the forefront of cutting edge science where it belongs.

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #638 on: March 04, 2013, 01:52:07 AM »
Quote
You sure cut a pile of work out for me. How about you trying it?

I am just giving you some advice on how to get more out of what you are doing.  It's up to you if you want to understand your setups fully or not.

Sorry, I am not making any claims or doing any tests myself.  The old line that "you can't make any statements or comments unless you build yourself" is a false claim.  I have tons of bench experience and even made measurements on motors a long time ago.  So I am offering you my advice based on real-world experience.

For example, you state, "The output coil needs a load to generate Lenz delay propulsion."  If I understand what you are stating you mean that as the rotor magnet leaves the output coil, the output coil may push on the rotor to make it turn faster.  It may be true that there is a push from the output coil like you state.  The question that you are not asking yourself is where the push came from.  In all likelihood, the output coil does three things when the rotor magnet passes it.  1) It gets energy induced into it when the magnet is approaching.  This causes classic Lenz drag on the rotor and slows it down.  2)  The energy induced in the coil causes a push on the rotor when the magnet is moving away.  3)  Since the output coil is driving a load, by definition it is causing Lenz drag on the motor.  Then net result from all three components is a Lenz drag on the rotor.

I am just throwing some ideas at you for you to think about.  The real answer to these questions is to analyze the dynamics of your motor with your scope.  You put some current sensing resistors in different places and then measure the voltages and currents and relate that back to the angular displacement of the rotor and the magnets passing by the output coils.

I don't have the answers for you, I am just telling you what you should consider doing if you want to find the answers for yourself.  If you produced a timing diagram that tracked the rotor position, the supply voltages and currents, the output coil voltages and currents, etc, then you should be able to figure out for yourself if I am on the right track (or not) for the three output coil effects that I am talking about above.  Certainly there is no "magic push" from an output coil.  If the output coil gives a push to the rotor then the energy for that push has to come from somewhere.  A properly done timing diagram should reveal all of that to you if you know how to interpret the waveforms.

I just did a Google image search on "pulse motor timing diagram."  Try it yourself and you will see what I am talking about.

MileHigh

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #639 on: March 05, 2013, 02:24:36 AM »
@MilgHigh,
 
 
You try it! There is no Lenz drag, because the rotor has two poles, or n-s as in JLN'S 18 magnet alternator. The approaching magnet starts a pole shift in the bifilar. It's so slow, it's on the other side of TDC when it appears.
 
You have no right to say I'm wrong with no proof. Break down for the pocket change cost for a few magnets and prove me wrong. I'm telling it putt putt's the rotor!

Offline DeepCut

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #640 on: March 05, 2013, 02:45:47 AM »
Enough parts have arrived for me to do some basic testing, once i have the coil wound.

While thinking about the device and the next coil test i have realised a HUGE flaw in my thinking :(

I was previously getting 600VAC for around 30KRPM with the single diametric magnet setup, obviously a fast spinner since it was light and powerful (0.6 Tesla).

With the new 12-magnet rotor, driven by a DC motor, although i will get the same frequency in the coil at a lower speed of 2KRPM, i will only get an output of 40VAC.

What a f***ing dickhead :( Can't believe i hadn't thought of that while designing and then ordering all these bits and pieces.

We live and learn ...


::sniff::

DC.


Offline MileHigh

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #641 on: March 05, 2013, 03:04:16 AM »
Synchro1:

I am making generic comments.  Are you referring to a specific setup of yours?  I looked back though several pages and I did not notice a link.

Thanks,

MileHigh

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #642 on: March 05, 2013, 03:20:03 PM »
View of the 3/4 inch spinner in the 2 1/2 inch PVC core above. The coil is a Radio Shack green wire spool, wpapped bifilar with the same green wire. One coil wall has to be removed so the output coil can squeeze through the hole cut through the CD griping cap. This coil has the two snug 1/2" neo magnet core diametrics taped inside. The coil need's to be positioned after the main 3/8" rotor reaches Lenz threshold r.p.m. for the magnet core output coil which is much lower then the threshold for the spinner and the power coil alone. Remeber, the "output coil need the Lenz delayed kickback field to keep the coil core magnets from slowing the rotor down with magnetic drag! Also a load needs to be attached, just a capacitor and diode to get the delay propulsion.

Offline MileHigh

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #643 on: March 06, 2013, 04:04:05 AM »
Synchro1:

I looked at the pictures and read your comments and read some of the EF thread from 2010.  All that I see is a variation on a pulse motor like countless others around here have made.  I don't see any measurements.

Honestly, you are getting carried away and drawing conclusions without any real evidence that anything special is going on.  Anybody can take a magnet that rotates on a shaft and a reed switch and a coil and make a motor like you show in your pictures.  Have fun but it's unwise to "over-interpret" what you are observing.

MileHigh

Offline synchro1

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Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #644 on: March 06, 2013, 08:19:02 AM »
Synchro1:

I looked at the pictures and read your comments and read some of the EF thread from 2010.  All that I see is a variation on a pulse motor like countless others around here have made.  I don't see any measurements.

Honestly, you are getting carried away and drawing conclusions without any real evidence that anything special is going on.  Anybody can take a magnet that rotates on a shaft and a reed switch and a coil and make a motor like you show in your pictures.  Have fun but it's unwise to "over-interpret" what you are observing.

MileHigh

What do you mean you didn't see any measurements? You don't believe that diametric magnets will cause Lenz delay placed in the core of an output coil simply because you're being told that by me? Why don't you try it and find out. This is an important discovery.