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Author Topic: Water and gravity: look at this video  (Read 23704 times)

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #30 on: November 27, 2022, 01:00:25 AM »
A more practical abuse
Would be to place a pelton wheel on a siphon


The siphon doesnt care about the rate of flow
(beyond that which is required for its’ operation)


This momentum is a factor of the rate of flow.


The faster your siphon, the greater the accumulation of energy.
The energy required to initiate the siphon process is the difference in height
of the water volumes.
Which is already accounted for in the change in fluid heights of the two containers.


Ergo: the momentum is free

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #31 on: November 27, 2022, 01:02:25 AM »
we set the voltage, we get our voltage back
We control the current = overunity


If this applies in the physical world,
It must also apply to electricity in some form
a capacitor, discharged through a variable resistor
heat monitor of the resistor may lead to more insight

kolbacict

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2022, 03:42:23 PM »
https://www.hwcv.org/empty-pagef738a1ef
Why do you forget about that ? I think it looks like something.

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #33 on: November 28, 2022, 03:34:16 AM »
Further verification


Thank you kolbacict

Thaelin

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #34 on: November 28, 2022, 11:48:54 AM »
page missing??

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #35 on: November 28, 2022, 01:52:51 PM »
page missing??


Page is there, however there is a 404-error having to do with the frontpage image
So the main picture on the webpage doesnt show up, just returns a 404.


The rest of the site works.
Clicking the button, then the link that says machine
Takes you to a video (in danish i think?)
Which shows the principle behind using capillary to control buoyancy

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #36 on: November 30, 2022, 02:32:48 AM »

Energy in and out of a Cartesian Diver is exactly like a spring
We get back almost what we put in.


Gravitational Energy is extra


New video
https://youtu.be/AMgUzpwRe6Y












Examples:
https://youtu.be/sNOXFiJ4IDU
https://youtu.be/QukS1pxoezY
https://youtu.be/ljvp-iR18Ko
https://youtu.be/s5eIRjmor1w
https://youtu.be/TMju6WzDnHI

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #37 on: November 30, 2022, 12:16:51 PM »
As we can see, by analyzing the gravitational  momentum component
Of any 2-fluid system
A change in pressure results in a change in internal energy
greater than the energy input into the system by the pressure change alone.


And that this energy is directly derived from gravity

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #38 on: December 09, 2022, 02:47:39 PM »
Using the electroactive properties of a gas,
Such as NO2
we could potentially control buoyancy using electricity

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #39 on: December 15, 2022, 11:25:35 AM »
A ‘reverse Cartesian Diver’:


Eye dropped is filled with slightly less than a buoyant volume of Air
and HV electricity is passed into the bulb


Air ionizes and the plasma expands,
causing the eye dropper to become buoyant and float to the top.

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #40 on: December 18, 2022, 01:23:55 PM »
Let’s look at another aspect of this situation:


Suppose we have a sealed vessel containing:
a volume of water
a volume of air
and a flexible container of air (baloon)


Above the water, we have a set volume and pressure


submerge the baloon, and the water pressure (displacement)
collapses the baloon, thereby decreasing the overall volume.
The pressure of the air in the upper portion of the volume:
Decreases by the displacement of the expanded baloon.
Increases by the displacement of the collapsed baloon.


Does this result in a lower total internal pressure?
and if so, does this change in pressure equate to the change in
potential (buoyant) energy of the baloon?


Or: does the drop in pressure cause the displacement of the water
to increase by this same difference?


I used the extreme case of a baloon, so as to draw comparison to
the same situation using a non flexible container (hard ball of same mass and volume)


We see the rise in water volume (displacement) differs greatly.


So if gravity is conservative: where does this excess energy come from?
The energy required to submerge either vessel (of the same initial volume)
is the same. The potential energy, however is less in the collapsed baloon.
The change in pressure of the upper volume is different in both cases as well.
As also is the change in pressure of the submerged air vessels.


The flexible baloon compresses greatly, the non-flexible baloon does not compress.


In the non-flexible case: total internal pressure increases by a factor of
the effect of gravity on the displaced mass of water and the height of displacement.


In the flexible-case, we subtract the compression ratio of the baloon at the submerged depth.


Input energy is the same in both cases, and the difference in potential energy is exactly equal to
the energy required to recompress the upper air volume.
Water, being an incompressible fluid, maintains its’ volume, even though the pressure has increased.
Air pressure in the flexible case, should therefore also increase, however a drop in pressure indicates
that the temperature must have dropped within the upper air volume.
For this to be possible, the temperature of the submerged volume must increase.


When we analyze the temperature difference, this is precisely equal to the difference in
potential energy between the two submerged vessels.


Conclusion: the extractable portion of the gravitational force does not affect our
interpretation of the PVT equivalency.










sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #41 on: December 18, 2022, 01:33:27 PM »
Lets push further:


We have a vessel and a volume of water.
We perform electrolysis and convert this into HHO:
Using a known energy value
Causing the buoyant state


We allow the vessel to rise through the atmosphere.
At a significant height, we perform reverse electrolysis
thereby reclaiming our electrical energy and accounting for
all losses in the system.


Now we have excess energy = Mass of Water * Height * Gravity


Here we see that the energy required to achieve the buoyant state
is completely detached from the gravitational energy in the system.

sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #42 on: December 18, 2022, 02:00:14 PM »
It is important to understand here that Displacement
due to Buoyancy: is an effect of the gravitational force
NOT the cause.


Why is there a difference in force?
What IS the difference in force?


Why is buoyant force different than gravity?
And can we use this to our advantage?


1) there is a difference in force related to Density.
    Objects that are less dense than the medium experience buoyancy
    Objects that are more dense than the medium experience gravity.


2) for objects more dense than the fluid, the effects of gravity are proportional to
the difference in density. For solids in air (at 1 atm), there is not a large difference
between the least dense (non buoyant) solid and the most dense solid.
Therefore, gravitational force through the atmosphere is (almost) the same for every object.
However, when the medium is more dense (such as a liquid), changes in density of the object
greatly vary gravitational acceleration.


Buoyant Force, because air isnt very dense to begin with, the changes are far more drastic.
The less dense an object is (buoyant), the faster it rises through the gravitational field.


3) This is a more complex topic: buoyant force is caused by a difference in gravitational force.
When we calculate gravity, we use both interacting masses to determine field strength.
Similar to interactions between 2 charged particles.


Say, for instance, we have an electric field, and a series of charges of different values:
While all of our charges are attracted to the electric field source, they are each attracted
by a force proportional to their individual charge.


If charge density were high enough, we would have an ‘electric buoyancy’, similar to
what happens in a gravitational field. Particles with leas charge would experience a force
AWAY from the field source.
While particles with a greater charge would experience a (non buoyant) force TOWARDS
the field source.
Where this line is drawn depends (above critical density of the system) upon the proportionality
of the constituents.
Here on Earth, the atmosphere holds the highest proportion.
Therefore in Earth’s gravity, we draw the line at the density of air.


4) yes, yes we absolutely CAN!


sm0ky2

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #43 on: December 19, 2022, 01:42:49 AM »
I’m open to any opposing theories, constructive criticism,
Or idea that could advance this area of science.


Here’s another gravity engine i  designed


https://youtu.be/jv9lQVZ4tUM

Beginners Mind

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Re: Water and gravity: look at this video
« Reply #44 on: December 20, 2022, 07:47:24 AM »
Hi Sm0ky2,

Very clever design in your video!  Would you be willing to share more specifically how you envision moving the solenoid back and forth with minimal energy expenditure?  That solenoid is going to have to compress a fair amount of the air to increase the pressure enough to get the cartesian diver to overcome the resistance in the sprocket/chain mechanism. 

PS  I've enjoyed reading all your posts on this thread.  BTW, do you have any thoughts on the Plankz Buoyancy Engine?