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Solid States Devices => Captret effect => Topic started by: plengo on December 28, 2010, 12:56:36 AM

Title: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on December 28, 2010, 12:56:36 AM
I would like to share an experiment that utilizes the "Captret" (named by ibpointless2) and Tesla switch.

I noticed that the combination of the two ideas provides a simple and yet effective solution for producing light and possibly "work" for no energy cost.

On the schematic below one can see two modified caps, 2 batteries SLA 12v, one LED 5watts and a switch that is switching at a mere 2 hz frequency.

On the gig picture one will noticed that the relay is not visible. A video soon will be posted on youtube showing the whole thing working.

The two caps (as seen on the picture) are modified caps into a "Captret" where I added a clip that touches the outside casing of the capacitor and a wire connects it to the negative terminal of the capacitor.

The switch (S1) will connect the capacitor (C1) on the left to the top positive terminal of the battery B1 which is in series with battery B2. This will cause C1 to be charged to the full 24v (or whatever voltage that is). On the next stage of the switching process, C1 will than be connected to the positive of B2 (or negative of B1) where it will dump its charge into B2 causing it to charge up.

During discharge of the capacitor C1 into the battery B2 an LED will momentarily light up a little bit brighter. When S1 is connecting C1 into the positive of B1 the LED will also be lit but just a little bit less bright.

The whole process repeats to infinitum.

Even though this process has no obvious reasons to make one believe that the batteries B1 and B2 will charge up (increase both in voltage) while ligthing an LED for free as time passes, it indeed does.

Frequency is very important since, decreasing or increasing it will not work. There is a certain point where it simply works.

The captret alteration of the capacitors IS what makes this work, since I have (and many others) done this kind of "Tesla Switching" many times in the past and it always end up using all the energy available in the batteries until they simply die.

For some very strange reason I am to believe in the facts that somehow this configuration allows an "extra energy" from the capacitors to be exploited directing it to the battery B2 when switching.

Fausto.

ps: C1 and C2 are identical capacitors of 6000 uf 40v. B1 and B2 are two identical SLA batteries of 12v 5 amp/hour. LED is a 5 watts white super bright LED. Any relay will work.

ps2: videos here:

Part 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86A2hqg_2KA
Part 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01OmBjA0QoI
Part 3 (OU finally) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukJqJPat9Ow
Part 4 (OU+) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFO2wo6Ovk0
Part 5 (OU++) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjCwfX2nh4s
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: nul-points on December 28, 2010, 09:35:58 AM
hi Fausto - greetings for the New Year!


interesting developments with your Tesla Switch adaptation

remember on your self-sustaining Bedini thread we exchanged info about possible development of cap self-charge?

at that time all my earlier (2008/9) tests with cap self-charge had been down at the mV level because i'd been letting caps recharge from shorted condition

but since early this year i've been observing this effect both on caps & batteries at usable voltages (although the re-charge voltage swings are still comparatively low)

anyway, i thought i'd give you an update which may link into this whole cap re-charge issue which folks here have been observing and experimenting with for several years now


i think i may have achieved your suggestion for feeding the cap self-charge energy in with other effects to achieve a self-sustaining solid-state circuit

over the approx 19 days it's been operating a DIY cell-stack i made, the mean on-load terminal voltage has increased from 1.6V to 1.9V (varying with daily ambient temperature) and the trend shows it's still increasing

i feedback coil field-collapse energy via an LED into a 2200uF cap & then this feeds my DIY cell-stack which supplies the circuit

  http://www.overunity.com/index.php?topic=10174.0

thought you might be interested since you raised the question as to whether this might be possible!

all the best with your experiments
sandy
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: nievesoliveras on December 28, 2010, 02:31:51 PM
@fausto

It is good that you opened a new topic.

Jesus

Update:

I saw the videos you posted and you got it! Congratulations!!!
The only detail that is left is the auto switching.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on December 29, 2010, 12:49:23 AM
I have posted 7 videos so far showing the progress of the voltage on the batteries going up constantly while maintaining the LED lit.

I am also working on a totally solid state switching mechanism to replace the mechanical relay. It would be really appreciated if someone could help in designing a very simple and efficient switching solid state circuit that emulates the physical simple switch of the relay.

Voltage when this experiment started was 18.36v and now after 1 1/2 days it is 18.8681v and still going up. This is by far one of my best success stories where voltage is ABOVE resting voltage while giving light and still going up.

I need help.

Fausto.

ps: video part 6: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrLbHT66n8E
video part 7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qh6uY5a_C0
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: rave154 on December 29, 2010, 01:27:20 AM
Hi plengo,

ive been keeping an eye on IBPointless's tests and yours, unfortunately i am somewhat hindered at the moment with a broken arm ( its getting better ).

Do you have any 7555's?
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on December 29, 2010, 01:29:57 AM
no I don't have a 7555 only 555s. Hey this 7555 spec is GREAT, micro-amp range. This is exactly what I am looking for.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: nievesoliveras on December 29, 2010, 02:12:31 AM
I have been considering to use a car flasher as an oscillator.
It is an oscillator. The only thing needed is to open it and change the resistance to get the oscillation desired.

It does not need a driver.

I could be wrong though.

Jesus
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: rave154 on December 29, 2010, 02:23:44 AM
as far as i know ( I might be wrong but i dont think i am ), the 7555 can be plugged in as a direct replacement for a 555 with the exception of the pin-3 output current.

if anybody knows better please comment.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: Groundloop on December 29, 2010, 08:38:19 AM
@plengo,

Here is one way to do it.

Groundloop.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on December 29, 2010, 03:44:16 PM
@plengo,

Here is one way to do it.

Groundloop.

Thank you Groundloop. I was thinking the same since we've done that before, what I did not know is the consumption being that low. I will try it.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on December 30, 2010, 08:26:26 PM
A little update with my logging of the voltages.

I am also starting another captret circuit (version 8) where I am extracting about 46ma on average 16 volts (about 0.736 watts/h of power). I am not sure about this one. Battery is very depleted so I will have to wait and see it.

The captret of the videos is working wonderfully well.


Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 01, 2011, 06:27:22 AM
my latest voltage is: total both bateries = 19.6782v, battery B1 = 9.71v and B2 = 9.97v.

LED is a little bit brighter very noticeable to the eye.

I dont understand really why this one setup works so well.

I have been playing with the captret and there is a lot more than we can see. It is almost as if it has 3 caps inside and you can move charges from 2 of the interval virtual caps back and forth at any speed and not have any loss at all except the normal loss any cap looses when once charged let it sit.

I know that one will always loose around 50% of the energy when moving a charge from one capacitor to another (at least that's what the formulas on the books teaches) but with the captret one can move the charges back and forth on the internal virtual caps breaking that law.

I am able to pulse from those virtual caps and light 2 LEDs without any noticeable loss on the main normal poles of the cap and neither of the 2 virtual caps. It is very strange. I think this is one of the keys of the understanding of how the captret really works.

I have not been able to replicate my first currently running setup yet.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: aaron5120 on January 01, 2011, 04:48:54 PM

I have not been able to replicate my first currently running setup yet.

Hi plengo,
What do you mean your first setup? Do you have another variation of the setup than the one we saw in the photos you uploaded already?
I have bought a lot of caps in order to replicate your experiment, except I want to try NiMH rechargeable batteries instead of Lead acid ones. Maybe the charging time will be different. I have to adjust the duty cycle and also the relay switching time. I plan to use a reed switch in place of the relay( I do not have one that works on 12V DC).
How did you came across with the present caps value (6000MFD)?
Thanks for sharing with us your discovery, I think this is the most important discovery in 2010 in the free energy community: the Captret effect or the "Plengo effect" in honour to its discoverer.
aaron5120
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 01, 2011, 06:06:28 PM
Hello aaron5120,

the 6000mfd is just what I had around. I also played with many different caps sizes and shapes. Bigger better and higher voltage also better.

Make sure you use an LED that will show light on very very low amperage like 1 to 5ma. The effect is charging the battery while I am consuming that little power and getting light.

My second design is the one I am changing as I am learning about this captret. The FIRST design is untouched running for a week now and I will leave it running untouched for many more days to come so that it will show without any doubt that it is OU and free.

BTW, the captret was found and published publicly by a user named "ibpointless2" not me, so it should be called the ibpointless2 effect.

I also agree this has been an amazing discovery this year of 2010.

Fausto.

Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: ibpointless2 on January 02, 2011, 05:45:40 AM

BTW, the captret was found and published publicly by a user named "ibpointless2" not me, so it should be called the ibpointless2 effect.

I also agree this has been an amazing discovery this year of 2010.

Fausto.


Plengo I do thank you for being such a honest man.

I don't think people would like the "ibpointless2 effect", they might think it's a joke. I would say use my last name "Lovelace" but to some that is also a joke. Maybe use my initials "SLL Effect" , but i see the "Captret Effect" as best.


Plengo have you figured out a switching to use? I know it will be hard to build one, but the simpler the better. I also have a good feeling that transistors should not be used, unless used in a different way. You're probably asking why i would say that? I believe that our current setup of electronic components are setup to fail at getting overunity or free energy, they work with the idea of a closed environment. Sometimes the component needs to be adjusted different to get on the right track for overunity, I've shown that with the captret. I've have a few ideas brewing in my head and i'll post one if it truly works.

Some people are worried that i've stop working on the captret, but i'm really gathering a better understanding of it. My Goal has been to get to the bottom of this effect and i believe i'm getting close. I can make home made captrets with 20 captret layers, each producing their own power. I've got captrets powering themselves and other things, and when given a load will output more power over time. We have barely scratched the surface of the Captret effect, trust me it gets more crazier than self charging batteries.

Keep up the Good work Plengo, I really do enjoy watching the videos.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 02, 2011, 07:48:00 PM
I would like to share my findings about the inner workings of the captret. It is a complex component to say the least. It is as if it is composed of 3 caps being 2 virtual plus the known cap itself.

It will be very difficult to explain what I have found so far with my graphs.

On my first graph I am showing the log of the progess of the running and sucessfull version shown on my youtube videos. Voltage is still going up and LED is a little bit more bright now. I also noticed that battery B1 is drainning more than charging although I dont have its initial starting voltage. I would conclude on very little data on B1 that it is going down with time. Battery B2 on the contrary is indeed charging with time which explains the LED getting brighter too.

I think that if B1 continues going down I can swap the two batteries and let the process continue. Time will tell. So far I call this version of the captret a total sucess.


On the second picture (Flip/Flop on virtual caps) I noticed that the captret works as if it has two extra virtual caps between the two poles (points A and B). I named them VC1 (points A and C) and VC2 (points C and B). Starting with an empty cap when closing switch S1 battery B1 will charge cap C1. At the same time the voltage on the points A and C (virtual cap VC1) will also have a certain voltage of about 3/4 of C1 (A positive and C negative). Virtual cap VC2 will be also about 1/4 of C1 voltage (C positive and B negative).

Upon opening S1 and closing S3, LED D1 will blink and VC1 will go to zero while VC2 will be the same voltage of C1.
Upon opening S3 and closing S5, LED D2 will blink and VC2 will go to zero while VC1 will be the same voltage of C1 (after losses on C1 voltage). So C1 will be a little bit less than when we started and VC1 will be that same voltage of C1. That's why I called this diagram FLIP-FLOP, since one can switch S3 and S5 alternatively and have about 90% or more of the virtual caps VC1 and VC2 simply transfering to themselfs their charge with little loss while doing work.

One can also, during this FLIP-FLOP process, use that energy transfer and light LEDs as I am showing. I also built a simple circuit to prove that proccess and indeed it works. I think the laws of transfer of charge in capacitors DOES NOT work here since my experimental analysis has demonstrated to only have a small loss of power instead of the theoretical known 50%. THIS BY ITSELF IS PHENOMENAL.

When the virtual charges on VC1 and VC2 are gone we still have about 50% or more of the initial voltage on C1 left to be used one more time by switching S7 and having LED D3 to light.

The current on D1 and D2 is in the range of less than 2ma but incredible enough it still lights those LEDs to a shinning blink. This low amperage and the fact the the "charges" are moving around VC1 and VC2 and not behaving as the conventional transfer of charges of capacitors (which should loose always at least 50% at every instance) makes me believe that this is not a conventional charge as is thought.



On the last picture we have a series of graphs and circuit digrams showing the behavior of the captret when voltage is applied and when the power stored on cap C1 is used. Take note that we have 4 diffferent configurations and their corresponding graphs beneat them. Graph G2 (of more value) is expanded to the bottom right so that one can see the interaction of voltages among all the virtual caps VC1 and VC2 and the main cap C1.

Again, on those graphs I am thinking in terms of the previous picture of poinst A, B and C being:
- points A-B the normal cap poles of C1. A positive and B negative
- points A-C first virtual cap VC1. A positive and C negative
- points C-B second virtual cap VC2. C positive and B negative.

It is strange all by itself that the relative positve and negative references of potential among all the virtual caps is logical and at the same time illogical since physically we would understand or infer that point C is common to virtual caps VC1 and VC2 and YET have different potential in relation to A and B while easily transfering charges around without much loss. I could not even come up with a good theoretical diagram that could "represent" a captret.

I am forced to infer that, if OU is present on my running captret circuit (shown on the videos), it must be because of this "extra" charge present on VC1 and VC2 and as presented on the graph G2 it is extractable.

Please, study the graphs a little bit and try to understand my observations. It is difficult at first but the graphs shows a lot about the captret's behaviour.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 03, 2011, 03:28:11 AM
Based on my findings a designed another "Captret - Tesla Switch" where it is working wonderfully. It is using my PIC controller board using 3 switches.

Video is being uploaded on youtube.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: nul-points on January 03, 2011, 09:41:40 AM
hi Fausto

nice work with the captret switching!

would be cool to try some large value capacitors (or even captrets, maybe?), pre-charged to 12V, in place of your batteries B1 & B2

all the best
sandy
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: aaron5120 on January 04, 2011, 11:30:03 AM
I would like to share an experiment that utilizes the "Captret" (named by ibpointless2) and Tesla switch.

I noticed that the combination of the two ideas provides a simple and yet effective solution for producing light and possibly "work" for no energy cost.

On the schematic below one can see two modified caps, 2 batteries SLA 12v, one LED 5watts and a switch that is switching at a mere 2 hz frequency.


Frequency is very important since, decreasing or increasing it will not work. There is a certain point where it simply works.
ps: C1 and C2 are identical capacitors of 6000 uf 40v. B1 and B2 are two identical SLA batteries of 12v 5 amp/hour. LED is a 5 watts white super bright LED. Any relay will work.


Hi plengo,
According to your above description, the control relay is being activated by an external timing circuit, which obviously is using an external power other than the two SLA batteries's, is that true?
Considering the relay which probably is taking 12VDC or 24VDC 15~30mA , and the timing circuit which needs 4~5mA 12V to work, adding the LED's power, the circuit will not be self substainable.
There is a Solid State relay from Crydom : the D2W202F (digikey.com) that only needs 5VDC 3mA to operate.
For those whose are not experienced in PIC programming (like myself), and cannot enjoy the benefit of the PIC control option, I think the use of this SS relay with a CMOS 555 timer circuit will help to attain the objective of making the circuit self-substaining, without the need to use an extra power source to operate the relay switch. I do not know the current range of the 2 captrets charges if they are in the mA ballpark....What do you think, plengo?
aaron5120
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: hoptoad on January 04, 2011, 12:12:14 PM

 I also noticed that battery B1 is drainning more than charging although I dont have its initial starting voltage. I would conclude on very little data on B1 that it is going down with time. Battery B2 on the contrary is indeed charging with time which explains the LED getting brighter too.

I think that if B1 continues going down I can swap the two batteries and let the process continue. Time will tell. So far I call this version of the captret a total sucess........



Do the swap. Transpose the positions of B1 and B2. It's the easiest, no cost, no frills option to confirm whether the gain is real and therefore a total success, or an illusion due to incomplete analysis.

If total series voltage continues to rise over time after transposition, then my attention will be aroused! LOL

If total series voltage declines over time, then I'm inclined to think that you are witnessing the slow transfer of charge from one good high capacity battery, to a battery that has diminished capacitance due to internal damage or sulphation.

In other words, both batteries may be labeled the same, stating they are the same size, make, model, voltage, AHour rating, etc, but one of them (B2), is probably stuffed!    :'(  Kapoot!     :-\    KneeDeep.

Open terminal voltage on a battery is not an indicator of its actual capacity under load.

Reversing the position of B1 and B2 in the circuit will at least confirm or rule out capacitive difference between them.

Cheers from Hoptoad


Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: nievesoliveras on January 04, 2011, 04:43:16 PM
I see that the switch s5 and switch s3 do the same connection.
Only difference being a little more wire to get to s5 switch.

Jesus
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 04, 2011, 07:09:56 PM
I see that the switch s5 and switch s3 do the same connection.
Only difference being a little more wire to get to s5 switch.

Jesus

That's correct and I explained that in my video. Sometimes it is easier to switch two different switches than trying to time it to one switch, so I just showed on the drawings the real thing, but as you noticed I could have normalized that diagram to show only the logical.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 04, 2011, 07:11:01 PM
Do the swap. Transpose the positions of B1 and B2. It's the easiest, no cost, no frills option to confirm whether the gain is real and therefore a total success, or an illusion due to incomplete analysis.

If total series voltage continues to rise over time after transposition, then my attention will be aroused! LOL

If total series voltage declines over time, then I'm inclined to think that you are witnessing the slow transfer of charge from one good high capacity battery, to a battery that has diminished capacitance due to internal damage or sulphation.

In other words, both batteries may be labeled the same, stating they are the same size, make, model, voltage, AHour rating, etc, but one of them (B2), is probably stuffed!    :'(  Kapoot!     :-\    KneeDeep.

Open terminal voltage on a battery is not an indicator of its actual capacity under load.

Reversing the position of B1 and B2 in the circuit will at least confirm or rule out capacitive difference between them.

Cheers from Hoptoad

Hello Hoptoad,

you are absolutely correct. I will do that tonight since it is getting too low the voltage of one of the batteries.

Let's see what happens, cross your fingers.  :)

I am still puzzled though, in HOW can the battery B2 (the bottom) even get any charge? I understand how B1 (top battery) is loosing its charge since it is a closed path via the LED but how can B2 get any charge? from where?


Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: mscoffman on January 04, 2011, 08:44:14 PM

@arron,

SSR Solid state Relays are pretty much defined to have an internal Led driven
"opto isolators" in their front end controlling some semiconductor device, an
SCR, TRIAC or GTO FET as the backend power switching device.

While opto's are excellent feedthrough energy leakage isolators, helping provide
good primary/secondary energy isolation, the input Led current makes them
rather energy intensive to run, similar to relay coil current.  This makes them
not so desirable in circuits where every little bit of energy counts especially
where there are several control signals.

For low energy control one should consider "latching relays" that are
pulsed on and off briefly and then retain their states. These are available
at electronic supply houses. Also a low energy motor commutation switch
is a possibility for continuous low frequency signal switching.

:S:MarkSCoffman
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: nievesoliveras on January 05, 2011, 02:28:32 AM
Thank you @plengo!
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 05, 2011, 02:33:12 AM
I have bad news updates. Switching the batteries total voltage went DOWN. Now it is about 14.67v way below the initial 18v.

Sooooo, I think this design is not working.

Thanks to all for the support and the ideas.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: ibpointless2 on January 14, 2011, 03:02:46 AM
I think I may have figured out why the captret gives off extra energy. Its due to the radiant energy that surrounds us constantly, Heat. I figured out that the captret is a thermal couple, where normal thermal couples use two dissimilar metals the captret has two of the same metals. The heat thats around us is being gathered by the captret and turned into electricity, thus the reason for the self charging. Place your captrets near a heat source like the sun or light to get more power out of it. The good news is that there is heat around us at all times and the captret is a way to gather that extra radiant energy and put it to use. No matter where you go there will some type of heat, aka free energy, for us to use and the captret helps take advantage of it.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: aaron5120 on January 14, 2011, 05:57:21 AM
I think I may have figured out why the captret gives off extra energy. Its due to the radiant energy that surrounds us constantly, Heat. I figured out that the captret is a thermal couple, where normal thermal couples use two dissimilar metals the captret has two of the same metals. The heat thats around us is being gathered by the captret and turned into electricity, thus the reason for the self charging. Place your captrets near a heat source like the sun or light to get more power out of it. The good news is that there is heat around us at all times and the captret is a way to gather that extra radiant energy and put it to use. No matter where you go there will some type of heat, aka free energy, for us to use and the captret helps take advantage of it.
Hello ibpointless,
That is an interesting assertion about the cause of the Captret effect. Is there any possibility to design an experiment to proof this hypothesis? that is to confirm the heat is the source of the captret effect.
Say ...placing a captret under intense solar heat, and another identical captret in an heat isolated box and check if they present different recharged potentials, just my two cents...
aaron5120
I am impressed by the low power switches( blinking red leds) which DrSaminstine uses to recharge thecaptret circuit. That component uses lot less current to switch than a latching relay.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: ibpointless2 on January 14, 2011, 12:04:40 PM
Hello ibpointless,
That is an interesting assertion about the cause of the Captret effect. Is there any possibility to design an experiment to proof this hypothesis? that is to confirm the heat is the source of the captret effect.
Say ...placing a captret under intense solar heat, and another identical captret in an heat isolated box and check if they present different recharged potentials, just my two cents...
aaron5120
I am impressed by the low power switches( blinking red leds) which DrSaminstine uses to recharge thecaptret circuit. That component uses lot less current to switch than a latching relay.



I've made a video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBPAKNUWiAs
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: spinn_MP on January 14, 2011, 12:30:24 PM


I've made a video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBPAKNUWiAs
Lol. sorry?

Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on January 31, 2011, 06:37:55 PM
I think I may have figured out why the captret gives off extra energy. Its due to the radiant energy that surrounds us constantly, Heat. I figured out that the captret is a thermal couple, where normal thermal couples use two dissimilar metals the captret has two of the same metals. The heat thats around us is being gathered by the captret and turned into electricity, thus the reason for the self charging. Place your captrets near a heat source like the sun or light to get more power out of it. The good news is that there is heat around us at all times and the captret is a way to gather that extra radiant energy and put it to use. No matter where you go there will some type of heat, aka free energy, for us to use and the captret helps take advantage of it.

That's great. I will redo some of my experiments and use the LED 25 watts light to warm up the captret and see the effect.

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: ibpointless2 on January 31, 2011, 07:55:13 PM
That's great. I will redo some of my experiments and use the LED 25 watts light to warm up the captret and see the effect.

Fausto.

You could as try ceramic capacitors too, they seem to give a nice voltage increase when heat is applied. I've a video demonstrating that here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fldbdQr-c5I

The ceramic capacitors can also be squeezed like a piezoelectric too, also shown in the video.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: quantumtangles on June 12, 2011, 08:24:49 AM
I may have stumbled on a captret effect. This is not my area and I am not sure.

What struck me at the time as anomalous was that voltage increase by x 5, but amperage did not appear to decrease. This should not be possible. At the time I thought my amperage measurements must have been flawed (I still think this is the best explanation unless there is a better one). Putting it another way, how is it possible to amplify voltage without reducing amperage?

Yet that is what appeared to happen. Voltage definitely increased, but amperage seemed to remain constant.

In the experiment, I connected three toroid cores with various winding configurations to a capacitor, and tried to amplify the potential difference between my hands (the voltage in my skin). I was trying to build a human voltage amplifier to power telephones.

The experiment was as follows. A triple toroid solenoid array (configuration below, essentially three composite toroid cores with wire wound round them) was used to test the potential difference supplied solely by human skin (using various winding configurations) whilst connected to a 350v 3.3uf capacitor.

The results were as follows:

The apparatus amplified human potential difference (voltage output from the surface of the skin) when the fingers of different hands were used as terminal outputs.

The extent of the voltage amplification was modest but interesting. No changes in amperage took place that I was able to identify (other than by mathematical inference).

Amplification raised voltage from 0.08 volts (80 millivolts) to a steady (unchanging) 0.406 volts (volts not millivolts)

Vmax  (maximum voltage obtained) = 0.406v
Imax (maximum amperage obtained) = 0.4 milliamps

With this device voltage quickly reached a maximum level of 0.406 volts where it remained steady for 50 minutes (and presumably indefinitely) and amperage remained constant at 0.4ma for 50 minutes (and presumably indefinitely provided the human body is alive).

Accordingly, I suggest the device constitutes a type of human body voltage amplifier.

I tried and failed to illuminate various types of LED with the output of the device, but my LEDs were poor quality power hungry devices.

The toroid configuration used in the experiment was as follows:

Toroid A = 3 inch outer diameter (2 inch inner diameter) ferrite powder torus ring with two (approximately 0.3mm core) insulated copper wires wound around it 75 times each (a green wire and a yellow wire).

Each wire was wound around approximately 50% of the ferrite ring, so there was only one layer of wire. 75 windings of each wire were applied to Toroid A, giving a total of 150 windings on the toroid .

On each side of the torus, a pair of yellow and green wires exited. The windings were wrapped in insulating tape.

Toroid B = Much smaller 3cm outer diameter and 1cm inner diameter ferrite powder ring, wound with a single layer of 60 windings from one orange coloured copper wire.

Toroid C was identical to Toroid A save it had 150 windings of a single strand of orange wire of the same diameter. Two single orange wires exited toroid C.

One of the orange wires from Toroid C was connected to one pair of the yellow/green wires exiting Toroid A.

The other orange wire exiting Toroid C was connected to the red +ve sensor of the multi-meter.

The only remaining wires (a green and yellow wire exiting Toroid A) were connected to the black –ve sensor of the multimeter.

Connecting Toroid A on its own to the multimeter gave very low voltage readings and no reading at all for amperage.

At this point the capacitor was connected to the system after carefully ensuring it had been fully discharged.

I connected one multimeter sensor to one set of wires coming from the coil and then to the capacitor, and the other sensor only to the remaining pin of the capacitor.

This resulted in the above amplification of the potential difference in a Gaussian surface comprised of the skin on a living human body.

Is this what you would characterise as a captret effect?

Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: plengo on June 12, 2011, 04:18:28 PM
@quantumtangles,

that is a great finding. Would you be able to post a picture of your toroids so that it is much easier to follow? The capacitor you used was used on a normal configuration I assume? Could you post also a picture of an oscilloscope of input and output?

Many thanks,

Fausto.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: quantumtangles on June 12, 2011, 08:36:03 PM
@ Plengo

I can sure post photos of the toroids I used and the capacitor. I have used them for other experiments since then. They are not in the precise configuration but they have the same windings.

I did not use an oscilloscope for the voltage and amperage readings. I used a multi-metre which I can show in the photos.

My wife is in full 'anti-experimentation mode' this weekend (she is fed up with me experimenting all the time) so I will have to wait until Monday to post photos.
Title: Re: Captret and Tesla switch
Post by: quantumtangles on June 12, 2011, 11:51:06 PM
@ Plengo

I iterate I am not claiming to have made a 'discovery'.

On the contrary, I sent my findings to an academic at a major UK university. Although we remain in contact about other matters, he did not actually respond to the email about the experiment in question. I assumed it was of no significance (which may yet prove to be the case).

The aspect that most concerns me (the aspect that leads me to think I must have fallen into error) was the apparent amplification in voltage 'unaccompanied' by a proportionate decrease in amperage. The most reasonable explanation for this is experimental error.

Also, I did not use an oscilloscope. Merely a multi-metre.

For these reasons I would be most interested to learn whether it can be experimentally verified by other people.

Photos to follow next week.