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Author Topic: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42  (Read 27620 times)

Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #30 on: March 27, 2010, 02:31:10 PM »
Diode appears backwards in the first schematic.

Do you have an ammeter that measure frequency of AC?

Your circuit may not be oscillating at high enough frequency to jump the voltage up between commutations.

maybe i'm rusty on the newman concept, ..does the commutator switch polatiry of the current through the windings between commutations.  This may seem like a silly question this late in your postings...

but you may be able to use this to you advantage.  collapse through one winding may give you a voltage boost just like the joule thief would.  as it collapses, this back emf could possibly be translated to the other coils with diodes.  I think this is what Newman was talking about when he said he uses diodes instead of his normal commutator.

Which makes perfect sense.  ..a redirected magnetic field would cause greater efficient use of the energy in the system.

ooops the diode is backward.  Darn it.  I did not even think to consider its polarity for the drawing.  :)

Polarity is reversed every 180 degrees.  Not between segments, though it is shorted out to collapse the field.

I have wondered if i could turn my coils into a JTC, or an auto-coil. I am seriously thinking  about it.

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #30 on: March 27, 2010, 02:31:10 PM »

Offline jadaro2600

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #31 on: March 27, 2010, 09:41:02 PM »
You could make the JTC astable.  I've done this, it is supposed to create AC on a secondary.  You could look about 400-500 posts back on the JTC thread or check my profile page and show my posts to find it, it includes a schematic for a,multi-transistor version.

The switching would be independent from the speed of the motor, you would just need to create two independent DC sources and figure out how to commute them properly.  This would require a few changes to your brush mechanism.

 

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Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #32 on: March 28, 2010, 12:25:00 AM »
You could make the JTC astable.  I've done this, it is supposed to create AC on a secondary.  You could look about 400-500 posts back on the JTC thread or check my profile page and show my posts to find it, it includes a schematic for a,multi-transistor version.

The switching would be independent from the speed of the motor, you would just need to create two independent DC sources and figure out how to commute them properly.  This would require a few changes to your brush mechanism.

  I did try my coils as a auto-coil.  Worked until the polarity reverses.  Oh well.  I have gutted a few other old electronic devices, and have obtained several more coils  and a 68uF 400v cap. to toy with. These will keep me busy figuring them out for a few days. 

Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #33 on: March 28, 2010, 06:56:20 PM »
I posted this in the Joule Thief thread, but want to post it here as well.  Pretty much so I can find it latter, easier.

@all:  Here is something I am figuring out about the Joule Thief.  With my current setup, it does not matter what the input voltage is, I still get 120v out.  This is why a 1.5v battery drained to .5v can still power an LED.  This is very interesting. So what do I have to do the get more voltage out.  I would love to power my Newman motor with only 1.5v input.  My guess is the number of windings in the larger side of the coil.  So I will definitely want to try an automobile's ignition coil.

I believe you only need enough to bias the base-emitter junction of the transistor.  And perhaps the speed at which the transistor can be switched on and off plays a factor in how much I can get out of a JTC.  Hmmmm...............................

I have included a schematic of my setup, which seems to be the best efficiency (voltage wise, most bang per volt).  I did not include a voltage value, because it seems to not matter.


Offline jadaro2600

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #34 on: March 28, 2010, 10:17:44 PM »
I'm going to eventually build my own.  Based upon the principle I witnessed as such.

I had a round magnet, and placed it vertically in a solenoid, it was roughly the same diameter is the inner coil ..so it rested at two points on the sides, and it very slowly  would go vertical.  I think it was generating a decent current in the coil as it did so.

But, I'm going to take a different route.  I think your prime mover ( rotor ) assembly is too heavy, but I don't actually know what the weight is, or the prevailing math behind it for that matter.

What i would like to try is a similar setup, on a much smaller scale.  I think the voltage through the coils, relative to the intensity of the magnetic field will give me good rotation.  I want it to be voltage oriented, so I doubt it will produce any torque.  ..I may attach a fan blade or something to it as a load.

The device may be AC oriented if I were to rotate it..

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #34 on: March 28, 2010, 10:17:44 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #35 on: March 29, 2010, 04:11:02 AM »
@Jarado2600: Yes, my rotor is a bit on the heavy side.  I don't mind the weight that much since Newman was able to turn a 600lbs magnet with only 1 1/2 watts.  He was able to do that because he had 4000lbs of copper atoms being aligned. 

My second motor had the magnetic field kept to a 6 in. by 4 1/2 in. diameter area.  My idea was that by making a bigger rotor, I would get more leverage, and then more torque, but this will require significantly more wire.

I just put a bi-directional LED in my JTC, across the collector-emitter, and it started out green, and then started being orange/yellow.  So there is flow in both directions.  hmmmmm...

Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2010, 04:20:01 AM »
After a little tinkering I have not been able to reproduce the bi-directional flow.  hmmmmm

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2010, 04:20:01 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline jadaro2600

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #37 on: April 01, 2010, 05:33:10 AM »
http://www.overunity.com/index.php?topic=6123.msg228146#msg228146

This is a link to the multi-transistor post  I made some time ago, ...you could use this to produce pulsing DC, or combine it some way.  I'm not sure how useful it is, but it only requires inductors, not a transformer.

I've been at a loss for time lately - things have been piling up around here.

Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #38 on: April 01, 2010, 07:11:03 AM »
http://www.overunity.com/index.php?topic=6123.msg228146#msg228146

This is a link to the multi-transistor post  I made some time ago, ...you could use this to produce pulsing DC, or combine it some way.  I'm not sure how useful it is, but it only requires inductors, not a transformer.

I've been at a loss for time lately - things have been piling up around here.

I do truly understand.  I have some slow days as well.  I haven't looked at the link you suggested for me.  I will tomorrow. 

I may need some help here soon.  I have acquired 3 disposable camera (used)  and now have the circuits on my desk.  The main question I have is: Do I remove the little transformer or leave it in, and just solder wires to the board?   I will go back to the beginning of the joule thief thread were I believe I saw posts about those cameras.  Second question: The capacitor in these circuits are not label as to how much voltage they can handle or the Farads. 

I am looking forward to playing with these.

Offline jadaro2600

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #39 on: April 01, 2010, 06:04:44 PM »
You power the circuit as you normally would with it in operating condition, and measure the voltage across it, it should be within speck for the circuit it's on alrady - this is the best way I would know how.

You can search the Joule Thief section for the words Fuji  or Fuji mod..

there was a lot of material on these boards.  Just as well, there are some boards recently posted, I acquired one from Goldmine electric, ..they were like 3 for a dollar or something.

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #39 on: April 01, 2010, 06:04:44 PM »
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Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #40 on: April 02, 2010, 12:31:57 AM »
@Jarado2600:  I have successfully extracted the transformer and Capacitor, and wired it up and got over 350v from it.  I am very happy.  The pin out of these transformers were a bit different than the one schematic  I looked at, but I figure it out.  Now I need to find some way to limit the discharge.  Starting up my motor requires about a 2-3 second discharge.  Once the motor is going then, less than a second will be fine.  I am almost ready to hook the joule thief up to the motor.

Offline detrix42

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #41 on: April 02, 2010, 10:15:57 PM »
@all:  Well, the results are not good.  My commutator has to much drag from my contacts/brushes.  I need a fast charge up time, and a slow discharge time.  Not sure how yet.

Back to the drawing board....


Offline Spirality

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #42 on: August 08, 2012, 03:27:44 AM »
hi detrix42
I'm re-building a Newman motor myself and found your thread a good read.
This video is about matching up your coil to your timing capacitor http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgAF8MxS7Rg
I include a photo of my reed switch repair-job, if you are replicating it, use something to spring the [nail] back down, as the more the Motor was run the more it stuck closed. I am also getting a build-up of carbon from the back-emf spark.
my post: http://www.overunity.com/12584/newman-motor-tinkering-and-teething-problems/

@all:  Well, the results are not good.  My commutator has to much drag from my contacts/brushes.  I need a fast charge up time, and a slow discharge time.  Not sure how yet.

Back to the drawing board....

Have you tried a capacitor placed in between your commutator and the main coils? Just an idea, it might absorb and discharge the voltage to the coil.

Also, after smoothing out the bumps in the commutator wheel, try replacing the brush with a small metal wheel?
You could probably mount the tiny axle on something springy.

Offline kenich53

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #43 on: January 12, 2014, 01:04:19 AM »
@jadaro2600:
   I am looking into the joule-thief (jt) circuit.  I am very interested. I am going to go a little off topic, but I also looked into the earth-battery.  I just did a quick test in my back yard.  I used a sheet of copper (6 5/8" x 3 1/2") and a 1 1/4" x 4" x 1/8" aluminium.  I got up to over 1vdc. This was achieved by wiggling the aluminium strip.  But if I left it alone, it would slowly drop in voltage.  I am tearing apart an old burned up computer power supply to get a ferrite Toroid.  I will be trying with 26awg, and 30awg enameled copper wire, hook it to the earth battery.  Thanks for the new info.
Howdy, worked over a joule-thief circuit that can give you enough current and step up voltage for most needs. Some circuit changes were made, am able to run a small radioshack motor and charge another battery in series if needed from a 6 volt battery source, oscillation of coil and transistor is about 5.4 kHz, and can reach a 49% percent duty cycle with tweeking. Trying to figure out where current is getting lost at, the transistor runs cold, that got my attention, did find you must keep a good sized cap on the output or voltage will shatter the C to E connection in the transistor, shorting it out. Can send a picture of my circuit and have been working on a P box layout if you need to see a working model.
This is my first time sending anything out, just bear with me, I will watch this site, see what is needed to show how nice the circuit works.

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Offline antimony

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #44 on: January 07, 2017, 04:56:11 PM »
I have just finished reading this thread and I would like to know if someone did used a JT to drive a Newman motor?
It's an interesting idea

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Re: Newman Motor #3 by detrix42
« Reply #44 on: January 07, 2017, 04:56:11 PM »

 

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