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Author Topic: I think I have passed the pendulum test  (Read 13367 times)

Offline currenthopper

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2009, 02:28:31 AM »
Several hundred thousand. And the company holds the technology rights to this invention.


C.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2009, 02:28:31 AM »

Offline broli

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2009, 02:38:42 AM »
Ehm, that figure is high. Are you saying your working device is made out of clockwork and/or gold? I assume it's completly mechanical and you had to run through some prototypes to get it running. Let's say the device is made out of 10 custom parts and each would cost 200$, that would be about 2000$ per custom build prototype. My estimate would be a boundary of 40.000$ on prototypes. Meaning you went through 40 different designs.

So what makes the investment so high?


Offline currenthopper

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2009, 02:46:18 AM »
Now will you give a opinion of my test and results. Is there something I'm missing.

The electric motor is mounted to the outershell of the device. This whole device is hung from a rope. Like in "side view pic". If I started the motor it would just go crazy the outside of the motor would spin opposite to the inside. It would not pull left or right in would just hang there in the center and spin.

Now place two rails on both sides of the device to stop it from counter rotating. "top view" It's still free to swing back and forth between the rails, they hardly touch it.

Now turn it on. It pulls to the right about 3 inches from top center.
Turn the machine around and it pulls 3 inches left of center.

And i can do this over  and over. It doesn't oscillate at all it keeps pulling until turned off.
At low rpm it pulls just a little maybe 1/2 inch from center mark and at high rpm it pulls the full 3 inches.

Now if i mated two of these devices together so they counter balance one another I would have a force propels you in one direction only.


Can you see anything I have done wrong, or some other problem.



C.

Offline currenthopper

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2009, 02:50:23 AM »
What the hell are you talking about? A investment is made determined by the value of the company and it's idea and how well it can be secured by intellectual properties. It has nothing to do with what a prototype is going to cost. You obviously have never invested in a company.

C.


Anyway! Way off topic!!!!


Offline currenthopper

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2009, 02:53:12 AM »
There is more to a company than what the prototype costs.

Legal fee
Patent work
salaries
insurance
etc...

Get my point.

C.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2009, 02:53:12 AM »
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Offline broli

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #20 on: July 23, 2009, 03:02:44 AM »
There are certain people here who will tell you have done a million things wrong and never be satisfied. Others will believe you have done nothing wrong. But the point is to share your findings and ideas. Basically you're teasing people and trying to use them for your self interests. I don't quite see the point if you are not willing to share or open source your invention. I may not understand corporate crap but you don't understand what this forum and the general FE cause is about.
 

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2009, 03:27:44 AM »
Well, regardless of the political issues, I see a problem with those side rails--the anti-rotation rails.

The device clearly must push against the rails to see their effect--otherwise they would not be needed, after all--so it must be shown that the interaction between the rails and the device cannot be the cause of the displacement thrust.
This might be hard to do. First I would try rollers or bearings, to minimize the friction with the rails, so that the anti-torque effect could be separated from any friction thrust in the direction of the displacement.
But it really would be better if there aren't any rails. Can a counterrotating "twin" be made that would still push in the same direction? Then the two paired devices could cancel each other's torque and the rails would not be needed.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2009, 03:27:44 AM »
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Offline currenthopper

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2009, 04:23:15 AM »
Yes a counter rotating mate would be the answer and eliminate the need for rails. I'm working on it.

However,
 There is no bouncing on the rails. The device holds to the wall of the rail and slides forward. So I believe the rail is simply stopping the rotation.

C.

Further study is needed.

Offline currenthopper

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2009, 04:31:05 AM »
On further study,
 I see the device slowly moves along the rail. It doesn't bounce or vibrate forward. I can even hold the forward corner of the device just enough to stop the rotation and it pulls to the right like when in the trak. This shows me that by holding only one corner just to stop the counter rotation it still gives a thrust in one direction.

C.

Offline mondrasek

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2009, 03:26:22 PM »
Can a counterrotating "twin" be made that would still push in the same direction? Then the two paired devices could cancel each other's torque and the rails would not be needed.

Or, if it would be quicker and/or cheaper, could a powered gyroscope (simple electric motor powered flywheel) be added to the device and have the same torque cancelling effect?

I believe touching the device in any way influences this system such that you cannot claim to have successfuly passed the pendulum test.  Any contact will cause a force.  That force can be translated into sideways deflection of the pendulum.

I guess an alternative way to look at it would be to measure how much force is acting on the system at the contact point(s) of the device and rails.  If that force was measured, it might be equal to the force necessary to hold the pendulum off center by the amount you are witnessing.  And since measurement and calculations methods are always questioned, it is best to eliminate the need for the rails by some method.

M.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2009, 03:26:22 PM »
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Offline Cloxxki

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2009, 11:48:32 PM »
For a simple device which has some tendency to spin to it, would a cart that rolls up an incline from standstill, wheels with 2-ways bearings, also be accepted? The "rail" are not pushed off against, they're dragged up the same incline.

Offline lumen

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Re: I think I have passed the pendulum test
« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2009, 05:53:43 AM »
You could connect a long thin rod out one side and to a stationary point to stop the rotation. If it still climbs in one direction then it would be worth building a twin counter rotating device to continue testing further.



 

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