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Author Topic: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent  (Read 20052 times)

Offline Farlander

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2009, 05:43:26 AM »
Quote
. If I fail to get Meyer's design working then II might just take a crack at Lawtons.
What are Meyers circuit are you speaking of?  I've just completed a Lawton (specially modified by me) dual 555 timer to pulse a transformer.  I've searched for the original Meyers pulser circuit but never could come up with any component values, just labels on the schematics.
http://thewaterfuelsite.com/eslup%20rotacidni.jpg
http://thewaterfuelsite.com/VIC%20driver%201.GIF

Quote
Still not sure whether Meyers was using resonance or just pulsed dc.  Haven't had much luck using both at same time.
How is it that you can attain resonance and use pulsed DC?  You need pulsed DC to establish resonance.  Do you know how to build the resonant feedback detector?  This is the key to the whole thing in my opinion, as well as the invention of high speed switching diodes.
http://thewaterfuelsite.com/kcol%20esahp.jpg

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2009, 05:43:26 AM »

Offline Garfield

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2009, 03:50:25 AM »
"What are Meyers circuit are you speaking of?"

There is no meyer's circuit as such. Just a bunch of diagrams with no part values & some  pseudo descriptions which we are all trying to make work.

"How is it  that you can attain resonance and use pulsed dc?"

No. I can attain resonance regardless of the waveform. But if you use a positive going square wave pulse, the wave form across the plates will always be a sine wave. Meyer's diagrams always shows square-wave pulses across the cell at resonance. You can't have a resonant condition using square wave pulses & expect the output to remain a square wave. Resonant circuits just don't work that way.
  If you found a way to do it I'd sure like to know.
I won't concern myself with a "resonant feedback detector" at this time until I get some of the basic stuff sorted out.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2009, 05:15:31 AM by Garfield »

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline CrazyEwok

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2009, 04:30:41 AM »
Your post prompted me to look up and study an article on building a tesla coil.  It uses the same theory of Meyers by using a series resonant circuit. As you may know, the voltage build-up in this circuit is limited mainly by the resistance of the coil. This construction article uses 8 turns of 3/16 in. copper tubing for the primary (very low resistance) . It's wound in pan-cake fashion so as not to arc between the windings. The thing will put out 3 foot sparks so potential must be in excess of several hundred Kv. Way too much for a fuel cell. The resonant frequency is up in the RF range.
   Also, that binary coil could never work as anything over 5000 volts or so would cause arcing and a breakdown between the 2 windings.What you would need is 2 seperate coils, one in each leg of the cell. The combined inductance of the 2 coils together with the capacitance of the wfc would determine the resonant frequency.
You do know that you just said that building the "concept" of a tesla coil to spec deems a Several hundred Kv output... I believe the specs are adjustable to deliver desired output. But as always we will see...

TOO THE LAB MINIONS!!! TO THE UNDREGROUND LAB!!!! MWAHAHAHAHAHAAA

Offline Farlander

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2009, 06:57:22 AM »
Quote
But if you use a positive going square wave pulse, the wave form across the plates will always be a sine wave. Meyer's diagrams always shows square-wave pulses across the cell at resonance. You can't have a resonant condition using square wave pulses & expect the output to remain a square wave. Resonant circuits just don't work that way.

I agree that the waveform at resonant condition will be a sine wave no matter what, this is well documented in physics laws.  Does this mean that the input has to be sine waves too?  in that case, we should be using an alternator like Stan or a bridge rectifier circuit so we can get the top half of the mains ac wave.  That should prove suitable as input signal.


Offline gammablok

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2009, 06:31:03 AM »
Hi Guys,
Sorry but I'm still on the meyer 4936961 replication.

Someone mentioned that the charging chokes are air core.
Can someone point me to that info.?

The water cell I built to spec (4" long stainless tubes etc.) measures about 39pF out of water. Immersed in filtered tap water, it measures 1.88nF.
Certainly not much capacitance but enough for a high voltage field if you can break the water loose.

Hope this helps with calculations
JL

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2009, 06:31:03 AM »
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Offline sparks

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #20 on: February 14, 2009, 04:29:54 PM »
    I think he uses pulse power to his cells.  If you have two saturable core reactors and they are tuned to saturate slightly out of phase the voltage appears across the cell as a very short highfrequency pulse.

Offline gammablok

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #21 on: February 14, 2009, 06:31:01 PM »
Has anyone tried using a radar modulator power supply. Klystrons are low capacitance.
Tune the pulse forming network (PFN) to the water cell and you might be set to go.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #21 on: February 14, 2009, 06:31:01 PM »
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Offline gammablok

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #22 on: February 14, 2009, 07:30:00 PM »
The short pulse makes sense. Its the only way you could apply HV without collapsing the mA supply.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/y7941574h27kv665/

Regards,
John

Offline ronvbnt

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Re: Hard Look at Stan Meyer Patent
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2014, 02:09:36 AM »
I just uploaded first ever videos showing a working spiral spool spinner making twisted bifilar wire.  https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/805268116/spool-spinner-makes-axially-spiraled-wire-twisted-0


Unless you found a way to twist thousands of feet of wire then none of you have followed Stans VIC guide.


I describe why I think it will work in the link above. Ron

 

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