Cookies-law

Cookies help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
http://www.overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please leave this website now. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

User Menu

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

Poplamp

poplamp

CCTool

CCTool

LEDTVforSale

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

OverUnity Book

overunity principles book

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

movieclipsfree

movie clips free

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Statistics


  • *Total Posts: 482431
  • *Total Topics: 14223
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 9
  • *Guests: 206
  • *Total: 215

Facebook

Author Topic: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger  (Read 59612 times)

Offline gotoluc

  • elite_member
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2764
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #45 on: November 18, 2008, 06:49:34 AM »
Hi Ossie and everyone,

well I tried to find a electronic component store in St. Petersburg, Florida and found none that sell small quantities other than Radio Shack and they have nothing compared to what they use to. They don't even carry enamel magnet wire anymore ???

No BD139 and no 150pf 

the diodes and resistor they had.

They had a MPS2222A and a 100pf so I took them. Do you think I can still test using these Ossie? if so, do I need to change the wire turns?

Thanks

Luc

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #45 on: November 18, 2008, 06:49:34 AM »

Offline Koen1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1172
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #46 on: November 18, 2008, 02:11:33 PM »
@Ossie: thanks for posting your stuff!

I see clear similarities with the "old" Bedini chargers,
but I like the way you use the seperate coils instead
of the transformer/electromagnet in his motor/chargers.

How efficient is this setup in charging the batteries, if I may ask?
(Can you fully charge 2 empty batteries from one full battery,
or is the ratio in:out something like 1:1.5, or what is it?
I ask because I have heard people descibe all kinds of
ratios, from just barely 1:1.1 to 1:2. :) )

keep up the good work!

kind regards,
Koen


Offline callanan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #47 on: November 18, 2008, 11:17:59 PM »
@Ossie: thanks for posting your stuff!

I see clear similarities with the "old" Bedini chargers,
but I like the way you use the seperate coils instead
of the transformer/electromagnet in his motor/chargers.

How efficient is this setup in charging the batteries, if I may ask?
(Can you fully charge 2 empty batteries from one full battery,
or is the ratio in:out something like 1:1.5, or what is it?
I ask because I have heard people descibe all kinds of
ratios, from just barely 1:1.1 to 1:2. :) )

keep up the good work!

kind regards,
Koen

Hi Koen,

There are too many variabilities to be able to give any sort of figures so I am just sticking to saying that I can increase the charge of both batteries by swapping. But because these circuits are working at HF & VHF frequencies, virtually everything will effect their performance. This is why I think Dr.S wants to make protoboards for people to simply prevent the variable of results from people making their own setups and then claim they don't work.

The similarities between Dr.S' ESEC and Bedini's RE battery chargers goes further. Dr.S is showing how he can now measure OU in a 3F capacitor in 111 seconds. Bedini always said that his RE chargers would charge a capacitor such that when discharged into a battery, it would charge the battery with more energy over time than what was required to power the charger. So I believe the next step for these wideband oscillators would be to charge a large capacitor as Dr.S has demonstrated, but then discharge it into a battery which is classic Bedini. After the battery has been charged, the energy can then be used as normal from the battery without effecting the OU operation of the oscillator circuit.

The reason why we would do this is because the very low impedance of the battery makes it a bad match for collecting the energy directly from the oscillator circuit. By charging a capacitor with the oscillator and then discharging the capacitor into the battery at specific intervals, we overcome the impedance mismatch between the oscillator and the battery and get a great deal more energy into the battery. I am working on this at the moment.

Regards,

Ossie


Offline Kator01

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 827
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #48 on: November 19, 2008, 02:06:28 AM »
Hi Luc,

this is strange. A few days ago I was shopping downtown in munich ( germany ) for getting some enameld mag-wire.
Luc, same thing, they told me, it is very hard to get it at all. Now how does this fit in with what I have posted about this
accumulation of scap because of the breakdown of chinese factories ?

I go now to my dump and try to get every old transformer I can put my hands on. Tt is hard work but here you will get your enameld wire. And do´nt  throw away the iron-core-filaments.

Kator01


Offline gotoluc

  • elite_member
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2764
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #49 on: November 19, 2008, 06:13:21 AM »
Yes Kator01, the World is becoming a strange place :-\

I rarely by buy new! I always pick-up CRT monitor, Microwaves, TV's and stuff when I see them on the side of the road and strip all I can to reuse. it's just now I'm not at home and would of like to build this and test but it may have to wait until I return :(

Luc

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #49 on: November 19, 2008, 06:13:21 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline DrStiffler

  • TPU-Elite
  • Hero Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 610
    • Stiffler Scientific
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #50 on: November 19, 2008, 04:32:20 PM »
Hi Koen,

There are too many variabilities to be able to give any sort of figures so I am just sticking to saying that I can increase the charge of both batteries by swapping. But because these circuits are working at HF & VHF frequencies, virtually everything will effect their performance. This is why I think Dr.S wants to make protoboards for people to simply prevent the variable of results from people making their own setups and then claim they don't work.

The similarities between Dr.S' ESEC and Bedini's RE battery chargers goes further. Dr.S is showing how he can now measure OU in a 3F capacitor in 111 seconds. Bedini always said that his RE chargers would charge a capacitor such that when discharged into a battery, it would charge the battery with more energy over time than what was required to power the charger. So I believe the next step for these wideband oscillators would be to charge a large capacitor as Dr.S has demonstrated, but then discharge it into a battery which is classic Bedini. After the battery has been charged, the energy can then be used as normal from the battery without effecting the OU operation of the oscillator circuit.

The reason why we would do this is because the very low impedance of the battery makes it a bad match for collecting the energy directly from the oscillator circuit. By charging a capacitor with the oscillator and then discharging the capacitor into the battery at specific intervals, we overcome the impedance mismatch between the oscillator and the battery and get a great deal more energy into the battery. I am working on this at the moment.

Regards,

Ossie


Some times the simplest of things are the hardest to obtain.

Getting excess energy is without doubt not simple, yet the big problem is in what and how to use it. The charge on the large storage caps is indeed fascinating,  but now what? Because the ESEC and SEC Exciters are at such a high impedance at the output, they rapidly drop from gain to unity and below very fast when anything is attached. This is the primary reason I have always insisted that instrumentation not be connected to the outputs during operation.

Now having said that, it is problematic in how to take the energy from multiple caps driven by multiple ESEC's and do something like Ossie has stated (dump into a battery) for conventional use.

I have had little success in solid state switching. To date the relay seems to be the present choice, but this is sad indeed. A ring of Exciters connected to relays and a sequencer to switch them into a battery system. Is this not high tech to low tech?

I designed the ESEC circuits in the way they are for the simple reason that they charge the cap and when charged as far as they can, the exciter shuts down (stops oscillating). This is designed in so that a current monitor can be used in the primary supply line for sensing when the cap is charged. This removed the need to connect monitor circuits across the caps. Yet problems still exist, you do not want multiple caps switched into the load at the same time, this should be simple to understand. So we need a control means to only allow one fully charged cap to dump at any one time.

Relays are fine to show the concept, but unless you are running the high gain ESEC's you use all you obtain in the control circuits.

I would welcome anyone to offer an idea on how to do this, oh, even with the relays you need very short leads or at least a two stage filter right off the cap (ferrite's). It would appear that for every problem solved a new one appears.

If anyone wants the Overunity Prize, use relays and a 4 watt ESEC, Stephen will have to go to the bank and get you the funds.

Dr.S.

Offline Koen1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1172
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #51 on: November 19, 2008, 06:56:45 PM »
Ok, thanks for the feedback guys :)

Guess I'll just have to study the work you have been doing some more ;)

Let's see what comes from the "Young effect" thread eh?


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #51 on: November 19, 2008, 06:56:45 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline nievesoliveras

  • elite_member
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1996
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #52 on: November 19, 2008, 07:53:13 PM »
@drstiffler

If anyone wants the Overunity Prize, use relays and a 4 watt ESEC, Stephen will have to go to the bank and get you the funds.

Dr.S.

I am not interested on the prize, but I am really interested on using a battery as small as 1.5volts or as big as a 9volt to move a small motor, and at the same time feed some charge to the running battery.
My question is: Is it posible to do that with the 4watt esec you mention here?

Jesus

Offline DrStiffler

  • TPU-Elite
  • Hero Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 610
    • Stiffler Scientific
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #53 on: November 19, 2008, 08:46:40 PM »
@drstiffler
I am not interested on the prize, but I am really interested on using a battery as small as 1.5volts or as big as a 9volt to move a small motor, and at the same time feed some charge to the running battery.
My question is: Is it posible to do that with the 4watt esec you mention here?

Jesus

@nievesoliveras

Not wanting to put my foot in my mouth, I don't know. With a ESEC running with an input of 10V@60mA starting and ending at 10V@20mA in less than 111 seconds charge (30sec to be exact) a 3F cap to 21.09J give or take, so you do the math on what multiple ESEC's or a larger 4W input(start) can do. The figures given are for an ESEC(1) as shown on my web site. One thing to note that is very important is that increasing the voltage on a ESEC(1) will not increase the excess energy. In fact there is a narrow range where the additional capture is found.

Might talk to Ossie on his circuit and see what it will do. As I have stated, my use of the energy has been limited to Heat Production and I have had multiple problems with certain types of batteries.
I have had little success in direct charge of LA and NiCd, although NiMH has shown some promise.

My direction so far is direct conversion to usable DC (direct) or to the production of Heat.

Dr.S.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2008, 09:08:24 PM by DrStiffler »

Offline nievesoliveras

  • elite_member
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1996
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #54 on: November 20, 2008, 01:18:48 AM »
@drstiffler

I am new to electronics and its formulas, that by the way are many and intricate. But I have been reading here and on your web site in order to catch on.
Eventually, If the lord so desires, I will learn. In the meantime I will just keep browsing and reading here and there.

Thank you.

Jesus

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #54 on: November 20, 2008, 01:18:48 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline AbbaRue

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 587
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #55 on: November 20, 2008, 08:11:21 AM »
@drstiffler

Perhaps if you replace the final output inductor with a transformer of the right inductance you can isolate
the output from the circuit to keep it oscillating.
And then draw the output current from the other side of the transformer.
I have been testing different circuit concepts using the following circuit simulator applet, and found that
using a transformer sometimes solves this very type of problem.

http://www.falstad.com/circuit/ 

The load on the other side of the transformer doesn't have the same effect on the rest of the circuit as a direct connection does.
I don't have a copy of the latest SEC built yet so I can't do any testing.


Offline Artic_Knight

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 330
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #56 on: October 12, 2009, 08:04:20 AM »
im looking at this curcuit as a simple desulfator circuit. The 2 battery set up is doable and looks like it would work (i have not tested yet) however a one battery solution would be better, perhaps we could work out how to add a part to the following diagram in the red circle to block undesired flow? or maybe the circuit needs to be largely redone? the way i see it we need to block spikes or sudden changes in power yet allow steady constant or semi constant flow from the battery. the issue is that there is not only a large spike to worry about but many smaller spikes and we want to keep them forced through the battery which a suitable return path is allso needed. a simple diode could provide the return path at a cost of another .7v which seems like a waste. another inductor at the red circle may direct the large pulse through the battery but there will be some losses. any suggestions?

imagin a bedini style charger that uses one battery only!


Offline lancerdoom

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #57 on: February 04, 2012, 05:19:13 PM »
i have designed the same circuit as shown in attachment, working good, but i want to upgrade it to the next level, i have 10 batteries 150 Ah per battery.
i did a little alternation (below) to the circuit can it work? if not then please guide me how to gain more power.

(http://s15.postimage.org/41ef8qvk7/With_Coils2_01_01.jpg)

or

http://s15.postimage.org/qq3m8bcy3/With_Coils2_01_01.jpg


Offline poynt99

  • TPU-Elite
  • Hero Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 3560
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #58 on: February 04, 2012, 05:25:23 PM »
The dual version should work lancerdoom, but I would recommend you change the diodes to 1N4007's or something with even higher breakdown voltage. The 1N4007 breakdown voltage is 1000V.

.99


Offline Rosemary Ainslie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3968
Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #59 on: February 05, 2012, 08:35:01 PM »
Golly Poynty,

Are you in the race for Stephan's prize too?  Seems a bit odd.    :o And why aren't you alerting these brave souls to the existence of your own prize?  I believe you've more or less thrashed out the terms by now?  Your hands on involvement here seems somewhat inappropriate if it means you get the first working demonstration and walk off with both your prize and Stephan's.

Regards,
R

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 4 Mhz Solid State Radiant Battery Charger
« Reply #59 on: February 05, 2012, 08:35:01 PM »

 

Share this topic to your favourite Social and Bookmark site

Please SHARE this topic at: