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Author Topic: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet  (Read 44369 times)

Offline Jdo300

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #75 on: September 02, 2006, 09:46:06 AM »
Hi Paul,

I loaded the file in FEMME and it got stuck half-way through the calculation process. This is a rare error, I've never had it happen in version 4.0. At the moment I am not sure what is causing it but if I were to take a guess, I would double-check the materials that you are using an make sure that the settings for those are correct. I'll keep playing with it and let you know if I come up with more information.

God Bless,
Jason O

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #76 on: September 02, 2006, 10:39:31 AM »
Hello z_p_e,

I have done extensive work on the design of coil pulse drive circuits for pulse motors, and have found that the cemf spike you are capturing and trying to make greater than your initial input power is only good for about a 64% return. However, you have to remember that you are also doing work with the original coil pulse, and the cemf spike is essentially free.

If you monitor the input coil current, replace the cemf bulb with a short, then monitor the cemf pulse current, you will see that the two peak currents are almost identical, however, the pulse duration of the cemf pulse will only be about 64% the length of your input pulse. This of course assumes that your input coil current has not "plateaued" and is still rising before you turn off the current.

I would suggest you try this (shorting out the load) and confirm the 64%, then apply your magnet and see if you can stretch the pulse out again to exceed the 64%. You should also see that the peak currents are equal in amplitude.

Why not do some work with the input pulse such as driving a pulse motor? Then capture the cemf spikes to step-charge a capacitor to ~40V (assuming a 12V battery), then discharge it into a second battery and repeat. Bedini claims this will re-charge a spent battery before the first battery dies, which implies you can continuously rotate the batteries and run your pulse motor for as long as you want.

Thank you very much for your informations about the cemf spike and its percentage proportion to the overall power.
Also thanks for your suggest how to improve this experiement (ditto to kingrs!). I will surely do this in good season.

As I formerly said in this thread my main goal is to learn how Mr. Marks device is working.
During the process of collecting more and more fragments of informations about Mr. Marks device, I change the point of view how it works serveral times. So currently I don't think this experiement will picture the main secret of Mr. Marks invention. I want to concentrate to more basically experiments now which don't use any metallic core. I don't want to get stuck by focusing only to one small approach.

Of course I will post results, progress or simply questions also in this thread.

Maybe some of the reproducers of my experiement want to go on with the current setup. As you already indicated it have some capabilities to be a OU-device.

Regards, Markus

Offline PaulLowrance

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #77 on: September 02, 2006, 06:19:00 PM »
Thanks Jason,

I'll look into the materials as you suggested.  I have noticed, so far, when I remove the coil the problem goes away.  If true, then I don't see why since the coil is simple copper material and a circuit property. As far as I can see, circuit properties are very simple-- a series/parallel checkbox and two current parameters.

That file was taken from one of the femm examples as a seed for that file. Presently I am working with a different femm example and so far so good-- knock on wood! :-)



Marcus,

It's good to hear you will still work on your devices. This morning I am more convinced than ever that you and Patrick Stephen's MEG are on to something big-- real potential for "free energy."  If I ever get FEMM working, lol, then I have a design that will hopefully shed some light.

BTW, Patrick Stephen is the original creator of the MEG, correct?

Paul

Offline PaulLowrance

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #78 on: September 02, 2006, 06:45:49 PM »
Jason,

Someone emailed me the answer, but I don't understand why it works since I don't understand exactly what the boundary property does.

He said ->


> as a first pass make a boundary called Zero with
> prescribed characteristics defaulted to zero.  Then
> go back select the edges of your box [all four] and assign
> those edges to the name, Zero.
>
> THEN your program will run as it stands. 


Thanks for help,
Paul

Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #79 on: September 02, 2006, 10:22:28 PM »
Hello again,

this time I would ask for your opinion about the "kick-effect" Mr. Steven Mark
mentioned when a current is floating through a wire for the first time.

Mr. Mark said:
"Scientists tell us that over unity is impossible. They say that you cannot
get more out of something then you put into it.
Then I think about that wire with the small kick when first turned on. . .
There in lies the secret my friend."

So I took him at his word and made a simple experiment.

I took my squarewave generator and feeded a simple 60cm wire with the square pulses.
Yes I simply shorten the output of the generator with an 60cm wire and measured
the voltage between this 60cm of copper. With an adequate high frequency this is not
destrutive for the output-transistor of the generator. :-)

But strictly speaking I also use a diode directly after the output of the generator
to uncouple the opositional cemf spike from the generator.

Then I measured the generatorsignal on chanel 1 of the scope and on the same
time the voltage across the 60cm wire on chanel 2.

So you see the inputsignal which is injected into the wire, ch1,  and compare
it to the voltage drop across the 60 cm wire, ch 2 (wich also gives informations
about the current that flow through the wire at the same time. The wire was
a quite thick copper wire, so I don't think that the resistance does change
during the experiment - not like "the glowing wire" within a incandescent lamp would do)

Look at the scope shots. Should this be the initial "Kicks" Mr. Mark is meaning?
(You have to multiply the shown voltages by factor 10, because of the used scope
probes which dividide the voltage by 10)

I hope so, but I would gladly hear your opinion.
And please let me also know if my setup/measurement is completely bullshit because of
errors in reasonings or something else. Thank you very much.


Regards, Markus


PS: I read still only the first 20% of the big thread >The Master Of Magnetics "Steven Mark"<
but it seems some of the readers nearly scared off Mr. Mark in this short time by asking thumb
questions or get him on his nerves with demanding more detailed informations about his invention.

I feel sad about the course of the above-mentioned thread, because I think it is a
unique chance to get in contact with such a great inventor. Since I saw the SM-Videos
for the first time (aprox. 1 year ago) I really never dreamed about to get more Information
than published in the Videos. I couldn't belive it when I saw the first time, that there where
statements personally from Mr. Mark in this big thread on www.overunity.com!

I hope in the remaining 80% of the above-mentioned thread will become better and more appreciate
to this great person.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2006, 10:45:03 PM by GM »

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #79 on: September 02, 2006, 10:22:28 PM »
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Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #80 on: September 02, 2006, 10:39:18 PM »
Marcus,

It's good to hear you will still work on your devices. This morning I am more convinced than ever that you and Patrick Stephen's MEG are on to something big-- real potential for "free energy."  If I ever get FEMM working, lol, then I have a design that will hopefully shed some light.

Hello Pawl 
(:D SCNR, just kidding - really! Every time you write Marcus I have to grin and say to myself "Oh he is once again thinking of Marcus Wagner.  :D But it's really no problem for me. You know, I am really insightfully)

Yes, as you ascertained I will not stop my experiments. Only shifting the area/range of experimenting.
I really want to suss out the secret of Mr. Marks fascinating power device. I am heavyly possessed by
his invention and the consequences for the mankind.
But to make progress, it requires some adaptions of the strategy some times. :-)


I would be very glad if you have success with your Idea.

Bye, Markus
« Last Edit: September 03, 2006, 04:17:53 PM by GM »

Offline PaulLowrance

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #81 on: September 03, 2006, 05:08:39 PM »
Hi Markus,

Here I am all this time thinking you were Marcus Wagner. He's not your brother is he, lol?  Marcus and Markus. ;-)

Sorry, my fault. I still like your device. It's even similar to MW's, no?

Paul

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #81 on: September 03, 2006, 05:08:39 PM »
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Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #82 on: September 03, 2006, 10:56:18 PM »
Hello z_p_e,

at first thank you very much for sharing your worked off informations about Mr. Marks invention!
:thumbsup: I think,I have enough to read the next time, including the mega SM-thread. :-)

Quote
One thing I would check before you get too far is the compensation of your scope probes.
The small bumps seen in your picture could be caused by an uncompensated probe.

I think the probes are proper compensated, because I compansate them according to the scopes user
manual... but I can be wrong.

I am not regular trained in using a scope. During my scholing -long time ago- I unfortunately
never learned how to use a scope. And my job(s) since then were never concerned to
electronics.

Okay I read some tutorials about using a scope, when I recently bought it, but I have no
practical experiences. :-/ So I could miss some important things during my experiements.

I use probes which are switchable from x1 factor to x10 factor. By today I used the probes
in x10 factor mode because I was afraid I could destroy my scope when some really heavy kickbacks
will appear during the measurements.

But I think the actually wire-experiment would not produce to high voltage kickbacks, so I could
use the probes in x1 factor mode.

But I have a novice question :blushing:
Do I understand it correclty, that probes with a x1 factor must NOT be compensate because they
pass through the signal unaltered to the scope?
If this is the case, then this mode would be the best to measure a correct signal, right?

Quote
The other thing that could be causing the small bump, is the inductance of your wire. It does appear that there is a significant enough inductance to cause a damped oscillation when the pulse goes low. To minimize the inductance, you could try a longer piece of wire, and keep it from forming any loops.

I have done the measurement again with a 2.5 meter long wire.
The wire is approx. 0.5mm in diameter. It's a wire which is used for telephone-installations
in germany. I took care that the wire does not form serveral loops, but it is in the nature
of this setup that I will have still *one* big loop.

Quote
One other thing is: which parameter should we be looking for? I, V, or P ? With your pictures, you are monitoring voltage, but perhaps is current the one that we should be looking for? If so, then I would suggest method #1 above be tried to see any effects. I'm not sure though if it makes any difference, as the effect may show in both.

Yes, but anyway one can only measure volages with a scope.

So when I measure the voltage across the wire I would also measure a value of the current
that flows throgh the wire. Not the absolute value but the tendecy. When the voltage alternation
goes up and down (wave looks like a hill), then IMHO we can be sure that it's not an alteration
of the resitance caused by a thermal increase of the wire.

Because if the wire would show an alteration in resistance caused by getting hotter, then the
measured signal would not drop shortly after the current will begin to flow. It would stay on
the higher level of voltage.
(Sorry I had some drinks in the meantime - I hope you understand what I mean ;-) )

Quote
Judging by the output voltage of CH1, it appears your signal generator has at least a 50 Ohm output as only about 6V is appearing there. You may try eliminating the diode and repeat the measurement. There should be no harm done to your generator, as you should be able to short its output directly without damage. Diodes can have a fairly significant "ON" resistance depending on the circuit and input parameters.

No, the generartors impedance is quite exactly the internal resistance of the 9.6 Volt accumulator.
Look at the schematic, the FET will switch the the full voltage through the wire.
The specified resistance of the FET, when it is in on-state, is less than 1 Ohm.

Please have a look on the new scope shots. If there are any errors in reasoning
please let me know. I'm not sure, but maybe this are really the kicks Mr. Mark told from.

Regards, Markus

(Ouhh, *burps* I have to go to bed now... No no, during the measurement I had no drink! ;-) )


@Paul: Hello Paul, no I have no brother. :-)
Quote
I still like your device. It's even similar to MW's, no?
As far as I know Marcus Wagner invented an "everlasting Battery", not an coil arrangement. But who knows? ;)
Edit 04.Sep.06: Paul, you're right! There is a battery charger made by Marcus Wagner. See here! And this circuit use a coil arrangement.
It was Marcus Ried who invented the "crystal battery". Ouh, so much Marcus' around me...
Sorry, this time it was my failure. But also he is not my brother. ;)
« Last Edit: September 04, 2006, 01:09:59 PM by GM »

Offline MeggerMan

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #83 on: September 03, 2006, 11:46:26 PM »
Hi Markus,
I see you are using a 9.6v (nicad?) drill power pack as your power supply.
You may want to put some large capacitors in your circuit, say about 20000uF to allow the Mosfet to fully switch on and to prevent the pulse circuit from losing its power during the "on" pulse.
Also I have seen circuits for PWM speed controllers use two transistors to fully switch the mosfet:
http://www.4qdtec.com/pwm-01.html#soph

You use a pnp and a npn transistor to fully turn the mosfet on and off.

I had no luck with my DC-DC circuit so I will build a pulse circuit like yours (using a 555) and test that instead.
I think the DC-DC controller is too clever for its own good and any changes introduced by the magnet I applied to the toroid was compensated for in the pulse applitude.  I did not use a scope, only 2 digital multi-meters measuring current.

Regards

Rob

Offline z_p_e

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #84 on: September 04, 2006, 02:31:49 AM »
Hi Markus.

Generally speaking, you can't measure the voltage across the 1 Ohm resistor that way. You are introducing a second ground in your circuit with the scope probe. This could explain why you are not measuring much voltage.

A better way to measure the voltage across the resistor (which will give you an indication of the current in the circuit) is to use both scope probes set at the same sensitivity, and in difference mode. There will be a switch somewhere that inverts channel 2 (usually) so that you can measure the difference between the two probes (CH1 - CH2). This way you do not load the circuit in any way, and your measurement will be true. So in your diagram, CH1 will be the same, but where you have the probe GND now, you will put CH2 there. You can attach one of the scope probe grounds to your circuit ground.

Your scope probe looks compensated....good stuff.

X10 probes are good when measuring high voltages, because it attenuates the signal. Also, they introduce less loading on the circuit you are measuring. Generally, X1 probes have a resistance of about 1M, and X10 probes are about 10M. For the measurement you are doing, the X1 position is more than adequate since your circuit contains relatively low resistances.

z_p_e

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #84 on: September 04, 2006, 02:31:49 AM »
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Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #85 on: September 06, 2006, 10:37:43 PM »
Sorry, I was busy in my job untill yet.

In my next measurements I will mind zpe's remarks.

But before I keep up with the tests I'm looking for an answer to one question:

It is a fact that there is a 'small bump/kick' when a current is start to float (see the screenshoot,
look at the small bump before the dumped oszillation on Ch1).
But how we can proof that this "extra energy" is not simply drawn from the battery?

I think it will not be possible to proof that, because even every small piece of wire which is
connected to the battery will show this bump, or not?

Any suggestions to solve this problem?


Markus

Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #86 on: September 06, 2006, 11:08:43 PM »
Easier said then done maybe...
:)

I think your guesswork is 100% correct - This will not be easy to realize! :)

Markus

Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #87 on: September 06, 2006, 11:28:33 PM »
Hello Rob,
I see you are using a 9.6v (nicad?) drill power pack as your power supply.
You may want to put some large capacitors in your circuit, say about 20000uF to allow the Mosfet to fully switch on and to prevent the pulse circuit from losing its power during the "on" pulse.

Yes, it's a NiCad power pack for a Drill, that's right.

But I think there are no capacitor needed to stabilize the puls which switch the MOSFET.
Look at the circuit diagram. The whole generator circuit is uncoupled from the "load-circuit".
It's feeded by a 5 volt voltage regulator, so the voltage of the NiCad must break down
under aprox. 6 Volt to affect the oscillator circuit.

But when I observe the battery voltage during the circuit is running nearly no voltage
break down is noticeably. Not even when I drive the circuit in 'shorten-modus' with 2.5 meter
of wire.

Anyway (and by the way): When I try to dive deeper into this experiments in future I will need
another generator. I think I will build my own digital squarewave generator based on a
microcontroller, so I can modify the software when the requirements will change.

Bye Markus

Offline hartiberlin

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #88 on: September 07, 2006, 01:52:58 AM »
Markus,
if you want to check out Steven Mark?s circuit properties
you need to wind your coils with iron wire !
Get yourself this iron house-garden wire with such a green
isolation.

Regards, Stefan.

Offline GM

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Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #89 on: September 11, 2006, 10:36:12 AM »
Hi everyone,

sorry for the period of silence.

At first: Thank you for all your good suggestions.

I will do some fundamental experiements the next time to proove some statements
related to the SM device. That means I will trace some single ideas. That means also
I am not able to elaborate on all your varying good ideas in this time.
I also have an allday-job and some other liabiliies - my time is limited.

So, please don't wonder, when I don't post the next time in this thread. BUT I'am still stay
tuned and I will do progress (hopefully) in the background.

If there are major discoverys during my experiments, I post them of course!

And if some of the replicators -yes, you-  of the coil-toroid-magnet-setup have some new
cognitions, I would be happy to read about in this thread.

So keep on searching.

Regards, Markus

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Interesting experiment with an transformer, 2 lamps, diodes and an magnet
« Reply #89 on: September 11, 2006, 10:36:12 AM »

 

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