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Author Topic: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations  (Read 262624 times)

Offline resonanceman

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #30 on: April 14, 2008, 07:17:02 AM »
Just  thought  I  would put  an idea out there and   see  if anyone else   has any  ideas  on it . 


here  is  a URL  for a Radiant  energy collector .

http://www.mondovista.com/meyers/

Figure 8  about 2/3  of the way  down is a simplified  drawing of  the basic collector .

I was wondering   about replacing the  magnet / coil   set up  on each end   with  something like  an earth  battery .
The  core would act as the  magnet .....

Figure 4  is the  original  rectifier / amplifier .   ......     the coil  part may  be  practical  today .....but the rectifier is  an early
version of  a  mercury vapor light . .......  according  to  what I  read on the web these  lamps may have as much  as several pounds of mercury  in them ...... probably not  very practical  to use today .   

I  was thinking of  using a   coil .......  with a  secondary  with  lots of windings ........
The  idea  is   to  boost the  voltage  enough  to   overcome the voltage  drop  in  a modern  diode

Come to think about it ......maybe the  right  configuration  would be   to  put   3   bifilar  windings on  one   iron  rod .
( Leave a  space in between the coils .)


Put a nice  big  secondary  on the middle  coil .....  diode bridge optional depending on  how you want to use the power .

It  would be interesting  to see if this  would  work  better on a tower or in the  ground .


gary


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline resonanceman

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #31 on: April 14, 2008, 08:17:09 AM »


http://www.mondovista.com/meyers/



I  had not  read the last  part of the   page .

near the bottom   is this about  the " simple " version in figure 8

Quote

The tests which I have found successful with the apparatus seen in Figure 8 were carried out by the employment first of horseshoe magnets approximately 4 inches in length, the bar comprising the horseshoe being about one inch square, the zincs being dimensioned proportionately and from this apparatus with the employment of a single intensifier and rectifier, as above stated, I was able to obtain a constant current of 8 volts.


I am not  sure  how the  zinc  adds to the  process . 


Another  little  suprise  that I missed

talking about the  windings in  the  intensifier

Quote

Thus it will be seen that alternating currents produced in the wires 6 and 7 will be rectified and delivered in the form of a direct current through the line wires 9 and 10, and I find by experiment that the wires 6 and 7 should be of iron, preferably soft, and may of course be insulated, the other wiring not specified as iron being of copper or other suitable material.


Today  pretty much all wiring is  copper ....here he is  specifying  iron  wire for a good share of the  device . 

It seems to me that iron  is a better connection to magnetic  fields or radiant  energy . 


gary



Offline jeanna

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #32 on: April 14, 2008, 07:40:58 PM »
Gary
Quote
Come to think about it ......maybe the  right  configuration  would be   to  put   3   bifilar  windings on  one   iron  rod .
( Leave a  space in between the coils .)

like a coil gun?

I have been thinking about this a lot.

I even have one (didn't work well on the second one) NS battery with 3 secondary's on it. It has the main one (scramble wound 200 winds) and one small one  around each extending wire. one on the fe6 one on the cu5. The small ones are very small, only 3 rows of 20 winds on each . I call this one #3. It is in the ground now.  btw, the sec's are made with radio shack green mag wire.

As a secondary these coils aren't getting anything from just being around the operating NS coil body1. But if I test with a dmm between the sec wire and either the 5fe or the 6cu, I see an amount of voltage equal to the best voltage the coil ever produced.

After hurting my fingers on this and one more coil I switched to 24 gauge wire. That may be why I haven't seen the effect again.

I have some more 18 gauge wire (like this on #3) and I may just make another just to see if I get more of the same effects. I will change the thickness of the core bolt1.

Judging by the tpu concepts and coil gun Plus adding the fact that I can collect the same voltsNamps from one coil simultaneously using 2 [ or more caps] in parallel, makes me want to pursue this more.



Back to your idea, Where will you connect the 12 wires?

thank you,

jeanna

Offline resonanceman

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #33 on: April 15, 2008, 12:12:35 AM »
Gary
Quote
Come to think about it ......maybe the  right  configuration  would be   to  put   3   bifilar  windings on  one   iron  rod .
( Leave a  space in between the coils .)

like a coil gun?

I have been thinking about this a lot.

I even have one (didn't work well on the second one) NS battery with 3 secondary's on it. It has the main one (scramble wound 200 winds) and one small one  around each extending wire. one on the fe6 one on the cu5. The small ones are very small, only 3 rows of 20 winds on each . I call this one #3. It is in the ground now.  btw, the sec's are made with radio shack green mag wire.

As a secondary these coils aren't getting anything from just being around the operating NS coil body1. But if I test with a dmm between the sec wire and either the 5fe or the 6cu, I see an amount of voltage equal to the best voltage the coil ever produced.

After hurting my fingers on this and one more coil I switched to 24 gauge wire. That may be why I haven't seen the effect again.

I have some more 18 gauge wire (like this on #3) and I may just make another just to see if I get more of the same effects. I will change the thickness of the core bolt1.

Judging by the tpu concepts and coil gun Plus adding the fact that I can collect the same voltsNamps from one coil simultaneously using 2 [ or more caps] in parallel, makes me want to pursue this more.



Back to your idea, Where will you connect the 12 wires?

thank you,

jeanna

Jeanna   

I  overspent on a few things last month so  I  don't  have any  extra  for testing this idea  right away .   


I am not  sure  if  it is like a coil gun or  not ......I  didn't   look into the coil gun  stuff .


If   you have a little time    ......and  you  are willing  you may be able to test it with little or no   expense .

I would have to build   2 more coils  and  maybe rebuild  my first  coil before I could  do any testing .

If   you have  a few coils  on a shelf there   you have most of what  would  be needed .


What   would be needed  is  3 coils  of  similar  construction ........one of them  should have  secondary .

I  would  tape  or  tie   the 3 coils to  a non  conductive  support  ....such as a broom stick or   piece of lumber .

I  am not  sure  how far apart   the coils should be . ...... I  am thinking that  more  distance may  be better ......but   at  this point   just  varifying  the basics  is  enough ...we don't need   an ideal set up .


The    copper  winding  of all  3 coils  should  be connected .....     same  with the iron  windings of all 3 coils .

I am thinking  it would be best to  connect these wires  with  the  same  kind of wire .......so  copper to  copper  iron to iron .


This   is all that is  required for  basic testing .

If  it is  going to work  like  a radiant   energy  absorber    you  should  be able to take   some  readings  .......  they  should  be  close to  the  combined  readings for  all 3 coils     (  3    5s and 3  6s in paralell    )

The   readings  should  be highest   when    the     coils are  lined up north and south .


The  the  secondary in the  center  coil  should read  higher  than with just one coil.


gary 



Offline resonanceman

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #34 on: April 15, 2008, 12:41:45 AM »


like a coil gun?

I have been thinking about this a lot.

I even have one (didn't work well on the second one) NS battery with 3 secondary's on it. It has the main one (scramble wound 200 winds) and one small one  around each extending wire. one on the fe6 one on the cu5. The small ones are very small, only 3 rows of 20 winds on each . I call this one #3. It is in the ground now.  btw, the sec's are made with radio shack green mag wire.

As a secondary these coils aren't getting anything from just being around the operating NS coil body1. But if I test with a dmm between the sec wire and either the 5fe or the 6cu, I see an amount of voltage equal to the best voltage the coil ever produced.

After hurting my fingers on this and one more coil I switched to 24 gauge wire. That may be why I haven't seen the effect again.

I have some more 18 gauge wire (like this on #3) and I may just make another just to see if I get more of the same effects. I will change the thickness of the core bolt1.

Judging by the tpu concepts and coil gun Plus adding the fact that I can collect the same voltsNamps from one coil simultaneously using 2 [ or more caps] in parallel, makes me want to pursue this more.



Back to your idea, Where will you connect the 12 wires?

thank you,

jeanna

Jeanna   

The  second part of testing ......assuming   the first  part looks  promising .  is   elavating   the  3 coils as much as possable and adding the  wires  to ground  with a cap in  series
The wires are  58 and 59  in fig  8       also  37 and 38 in fig  1

I wouldn't suggest a super cap .......as far as I know they can't  handle  much  voltage ...   I don't think the  size of the cap is  very important . 

I   don't  understand  it ...... but  every  accumulator   plan that I have seen  has a  cap in  a  wire  going to  ground ......and  they all state that   higher is better for the collector .

I  am thinking   that the  wires to ground  should be connected  with the    5s and 6s .......

remember   it should be as high as practical .......  and    aligned  with  north and  south . 

If  it is   going to work as  I hope ......The  readings   should be available  from  the   top of the caps  near the  ground   stakes.     hopefully  the  voltage  will go up  as   the  coils are  elavated .

Hopefully  higher  voltage   on  the 5s and 6s  will  raise the   power in the  secondary .




The only  thing  left to test  would be to see  how   it does in the  ground
I  would  assume that if  you  used  2 coils  that  have insulated windings  they  would  still  work   together ........up to a point .


I am    outlining this  just in case  you or someone else wants to  take the time to  try to test the  idea ....  I  have no  expectations ...... I  only  want   you to test this idea if it is what  YOU  want to do . 


gary   

« Last Edit: April 15, 2008, 01:07:45 AM by resonanceman »

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #34 on: April 15, 2008, 12:41:45 AM »
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Offline jeanna

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #35 on: April 15, 2008, 01:52:01 AM »
Gary,
This is a very interesting proposal.
I need to study it before I make a real comment.
I wonder what kind of cap you are talking about?

-----------------------------
The following is for you and Bill and anyone else making these things on a budget.  ;)

I make a coil for under $10. maybe a lot under.

A 1/4 inch bolt is 40 or 60 cents.
The 24 gauge wire is 4/roll of 100 ft.
the 24 gauge zinc galvanized steel wire is 4/roll 250 ft.
The cotton cloth was from flour sack cloths. which I bought 5 of but only needed 1 for something else, so they were not free but free. thread and needle even if you need to buy these are no more than 2$ for 10 years supply.
Washers are 20 cents but need to be taped. I made some washers out of yogurt tub tops. Poke a hole and feed the wire through. It works better than steel ones.

Now the cap is more and so is the secondary wire unless you take apart a broken something as Bill did.  But you can make these little coils for trying out ideas for cheap. The real big ones we will need later might cost something, but not these.

Also, I found that the 1/4 inch bolt is the perfect size to slide into a plastic drinking straw. It is a good insulation and very thin.  (Drinking straws vary a little, but the striped ones in my supermkt were 1/4 inch.) This means you can re-use the bolt because you can slip it out later. ;)

Just remember these are small and the voltage will be small. and don't be discouraged.

jeanna

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #36 on: April 15, 2008, 02:15:43 AM »
@ Jeanna:

Great post!  You are correct in your advice.  Anyone can make a small, simple, cheap version of the NS coil.  The only thing I am wondering about is the plastic straw....what are you using that for?  If it is for the insulation between the wire (first layer) and the core, I thought we needed that to be cotton as well to allow the passage of moisture and, whatever else.  I think maybe Hans said something about using heat shrink tubing for the same purpose so maybe my information is incorrect.  If you are getting near the output of what I am getting, and you are using the straw, then I guess that settles it. (I didn't remember if you used this on your 19 mA coil or not)

@ Gary:

Supercaps can't handle much voltage?  Do you mean total or for storage?  I thought that 5.5 F was a very large amount.  Of course, this is volume and if you put 2,000 volts to it it would blow up.  I am just not sure what you mean.  I love supercaps. (can you tell?)  They are so new that I am betting they have not been fully explored as of yet. Maybe we can go to a supercap and then to a rechargeable bat. to collect the energy there?

Bill

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #36 on: April 15, 2008, 02:15:43 AM »
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Offline jeanna

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #37 on: April 15, 2008, 03:32:18 AM »
the plastic straw....what are you using that for?  If it is for the insulation between the wire (first layer) and the core, I thought we needed that to be cotton as well to allow the passage of moisture and, whatever else. 
You are correct, Bill,
It was the thing that almost made me modify the post. But I am not sure.

First, no, it is not on the 19mamp coil. That coil uses a piece of pipe from the plumbing department. It was $4 so it adds that amount. not much for a whole lot of juice. But it is 3/4 in thick inside diameter so it takes a lot more wire. I got 6 full layers out of 100 ft. That is probably Ok cuz it is so strong. But I cannot experiment with longer lengths of wire. just shorter. :D

I guess this insulation is truely one of the questions. NS didn't have plastic. and he did say insulator, and when it needed more than cloth he said mica or similar. We can assume, but we don't know what it was for.

So, yeah I don't know about the straw. (when I used the straw, it was on the non-galvanic ones and I used the straw to be sure no galvanism occurred.)


Here is the thing about that core bolt. Maybe it needs to be galvanically connected to the rest of it but there is a need for capacitance in the workings of this thing. an insulator is what he specifies, and proposes a cloth or similar material. This is just another thing we must sort out.

And perhaps it is better not to make it from a straw just now.

thanks for asking.

jeanna

Offline resonanceman

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #38 on: April 15, 2008, 05:31:03 AM »
Gary,
This is a very interesting proposal.
I need to study it before I make a real comment.
I wonder what kind of cap you are talking about?

-----------------------------
The following is for you and Bill and anyone else making these things on a budget.  ;)

I make a coil for under $10. maybe a lot under.

A 1/4 inch bolt is 40 or 60 cents.
The 24 gauge wire is 4/roll of 100 ft.
the 24 gauge zinc galvanized steel wire is 4/roll 250 ft.
The cotton cloth was from flour sack cloths. which I bought 5 of but only needed 1 for something else, so they were not free but free. thread and needle even if you need to buy these are no more than 2$ for 10 years supply.
Washers are 20 cents but need to be taped. I made some washers out of yogurt tub tops. Poke a hole and feed the wire through. It works better than steel ones.

Now the cap is more and so is the secondary wire unless you take apart a broken something as Bill did.  But you can make these little coils for trying out ideas for cheap. The real big ones we will need later might cost something, but not these.

Also, I found that the 1/4 inch bolt is the perfect size to slide into a plastic drinking straw. It is a good insulation and very thin.  (Drinking straws vary a little, but the striped ones in my supermkt were 1/4 inch.) This means you can re-use the bolt because you can slip it out later. ;)

Just remember these are small and the voltage will be small. and don't be discouraged.

jeanna

Jeanna

The  cap I would  start  with is a motor run cap ....... 5 F  270 V AC ...... I also  have some smaller caps   that I would try   just  to see  if  the size of the cap makes  a difference .

I will think about  building  smaller  coils ........in  general  I  follow what I see in my mind on such things .
The  coils  I  see in my mind have big  wire .......around  1/4 in .   

just before  I went out to buy  parts  for my  coil I  wrote   that  we should  keep the coils  small .......because it is hard to make  a   big mistake  with a small coil .   
When I got to the store I found I  felt compelled to buy  what fit what  I saw in my mind ........not what I intellectually  thought  I should get.

For me  seeing  how  things  work is not an intellectual process .
I  try to  understand it  the best I can .......then  ....... I will  often  see it .
I can't  get things like math  formulas this way .....but I can often get  a good  idea the relationships  involved .   




Bill

I  don't  have  any real  experience with supercaps ....... I did  look  for  them online .....what I found were  caps that   had a very  high  farad rating but low voltage .... starting around  3  V  and topping out around  100 V

The ones I looked at were also very  expensive .

If  this   idea  of  using  earth batterys in place  of   the horseshoe  magnets  work well ...... (the horseshoe version  put out 8 volts )    there could posably  be  much higher voltage  from    our coils .......I just  didn't want  anyone  blowing  up  supercaps testing this 

gary

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #39 on: April 15, 2008, 07:19:31 AM »
@ Gary:

Awwww come on, you mean we can't blow up some caps?  Where's the fun in that? (Ha ha)  Like I said, I am still learning here so it is quite possible that I may blow something up before it's over.  There are many things I still don't understand about capacitors, or super caps.  Like, for example, your 5 F 270 volt cap........if I were to hook up 3 volts to it and let it sit there and charge, would the max. voltage on the cap be just 3 volts?  Or, would it be able to continue to charge to the full 270 volt capacity?  In other words, can you fill a cap. or super cap up with more volts than you are putting in?  Like a small hose of water filling a large bucket...the bucket will fill eventually...is this the same with caps?  I can't find anything about these questions in any of my electronics books, or on the net.  So much to learn.

Bill

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #39 on: April 15, 2008, 07:19:31 AM »
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Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #40 on: April 15, 2008, 08:10:10 AM »
@ All:

Found this here:http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=746

10 F super cap. for $4.95 ea.

Super Capacitor - 10F/2.5V

SKU#: COM-00746

Price: $4.95

10-99: $4.46 each (10% off)
100 or more: $3.96 each (20% off)

Description: Yes you read that correctly - 10Farad capacitor. This small cap can be charged up and then slowly dissapated running an entire system for hours. Combine two in series for 5F/5V. Do not over voltage or reverse polarize these capacitors.


Documents: 10F Super Cap Datasheet

Dimensions: 13x33.5mm

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #41 on: April 15, 2008, 08:33:01 AM »
@ All:

3,000 FARED!!!!!!!!!!


Maxwell Technologies BCAP3000 Ultracapacitors
Image of BOOSTCAP BCAP3000

    * 2.7 Volt operating voltage*
    * Over 1 million duty cycles
    * 3000 Farads
    * Threaded terminal or weldable post versions
    * Ultra-low internal resistance

BCAP3000 E270 features at a glance
Capacitance (Farads)    3000


Bill


Offline resonanceman

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #42 on: April 15, 2008, 03:47:54 PM »
@ Gary:

Awwww come on, you mean we can't blow up some caps?  Where's the fun in that? (Ha ha)  Like I said, I am still learning here so it is quite possible that I may blow something up before it's over.  There are many things I still don't understand about capacitors, or super caps.  Like, for example, your 5 F 270 volt cap........if I were to hook up 3 volts to it and let it sit there and charge, would the max. voltage on the cap be just 3 volts?  Or, would it be able to continue to charge to the full 270 volt capacity?  In other words, can you fill a cap. or super cap up with more volts than you are putting in?  Like a small hose of water filling a large bucket...the bucket will fill eventually...is this the same with caps?  I can't find anything about these questions in any of my electronics books, or on the net.  So much to learn.

Bill

Bill

If  you  charge any cap  with  a steady  3 V    you  will end up  with a cap charged to 3 volts ......no magic here .

Now ....... if you charge 2 caps to 3  V and   connect them  in  series    then   dump  them  into  a 3rd cap    you will have well over  3   V    this is  known  as a  Tesla  switch  or   Scalar battery charger   
( most   often  Tesla switches  are  built with  batterys . ) 

The  reason  I was going to start  with a relativly  high  voltage cap is   because I have  have heard that there  can be  large variations  in  the power  that can  be  received from the  air or earth .........  AC run caps are  relatively big .....and  tough .......but also  relatively  cheep ........   the   only thing   you have to be careful  of is  if you   do overload one .......they get messy ......they can  spray  the oil  inside them all over the room ..... That oil is NOT  something  you want to breath .

About  blowing  up caps ...........did you know that if you  connect a small  low voltage cap  across   110 V   (  house wiring  )   it  will blow up like a firecracker ?   
  I don't remember  how small  you  have to go to get  a bang out of it . 



gary





Offline resonanceman

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #43 on: April 15, 2008, 04:04:18 PM »
Bill

Thanks  for the  links for  supercaps

here is a  different kind of cap I found .

http://www.evanscap.com/hybrid.htm


gary


Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #44 on: April 15, 2008, 05:59:19 PM »
@ Gary:

Thanks for the explanation on the caps.  I was not sure.  That is a cool link too, I bookmarked it for future reference.  I was just amazed at the second type of super cap I found with 3,000 F, I thought that 5.5 F or 10 F was big, but 3,000?  I can't wait to play with some of these.  Thanks.

Bill

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Re: Stubblefield coils (bifilar) and speculations
« Reply #44 on: April 15, 2008, 05:59:19 PM »

 

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