Cookies-law

Cookies help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
http://www.overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please leave this website now. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

Poplamp

poplamp

CCTool

CCTool

LEDTVforSale

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

OverUnity Book

overunity principles book

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Statistics

  • *Total Members: 81962
  • *Latest: kobus

  • *Total Posts: 491865
  • *Total Topics: 14475
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 3
  • *Guests: 116
  • *Total: 119

Facebook

Author Topic: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg  (Read 196165 times)

Offline Kator01

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 829
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2008, 12:35:54 PM »
Hello all,

please find attached the pic of the powermeter this inventor used for measuring input-power.

These types of meter do not show correct values. This is a type I used in my above describe experiment.

So it is necesssary to do it right. DC - Input is easy but no ac.

search here for anarticle of Proj. Kanarev on "The law of the elecric circuit" :

http://guns.connect.fi/innoplaza/energy/story/Kanarev/#articles

Best Regards

Kator





Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2008, 12:35:54 PM »

Offline Getca

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #46 on: October 30, 2008, 01:54:11 PM »
In Waleri Ivanov`s home, I was seen black working box with sinusoidal input - from big transformer 220V/30V 50Hz (such as video) and sinusoidal output. I saw unfinished items (see flash video and pictures from inwertor`s site) next to him.
All powers was CORRECTLY measured with oscilloscopes, analog multimeters, etc. I do like precision measurement.

This device in the picture is AC power meter and it's sold by Conrad Electronics as a power meter of sinus shaped voltage and current. Maybe there is something wrong if the input current wave has a different form. But Altium says all is OK and the measurement is correct.

Wish You success
Rossen


Offline Nali2001

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #47 on: October 30, 2008, 05:22:30 PM »
Hi all, well I will just give ya'll my view on how his 'recent devices' are being powered.
Yes he for some reason used half wave ac.
But I very much believe that these days with the systems 'in the box' he is using a different approach.

I very much believe that the is taking regular ac, which is in the box rectified to a steady dc state. This dc is pulsed in short duty cycle pulses to the input coil. But the important thing is that on the input coil is also a (tuned) capacitor. What this does is make the signal on the input a resonant sinus.

You see, you only need to input power to the input coil for as long as it takes to flip the magnet over. Any longer and it's wasted. If it takes 10ms to fully flip over the field of the magnet, then it is wasteful to input for example 20ms. And you only have ''pulse length control' with custom adjustable pulse width modulation, not with half wave ac...
And the advantage the cap gives is if you take a coil and a cap, and you very briefly pulse it with a dc pulse, the power will oscillate for a while in a ac sinus fashion in the coil and cap. So it is a way of getting clear ac from dc pulses.

This is in my opinion what he describes in picture Bm002.gif (see below)
And what the latest video shows is just that... short duty cycle dc pulses on a cap: See picture Bm001.jpg (also below)
And keep in mind that there probably is much more stuff in the box then the meg itself. I mean what are all these components? See image Bm003.jpg.

And there is this thing as well:
It goes like this: You switch the switch(input) coil and that core section (near)saturates and the magnet field goes to the output side. There, there is a cap and a load, the (tuned) cap is damn necessary it helps the output 10 fold and makes the output a pure ac since. Welnow you power off the input coil and the field of the magnet return to the side of the switching coil. BUT this returning of the field is due to the airgap a 'free field change' that seemingly is not used. And should be near as powerful as the first magnet switch action. Well what I now suspect is that, the switch coil is like said before fed with short input dc pulses and has a cap to make the resulting wave ac, which helps the core in various ways. BUT the returning field of the magnet is in combination with the cap there is systems that due to the return of the field induces power in the coil but on that coil is a cap and so with the right cap a resonance is set up. In such a way is the returning field translated in helping the switching along greatly. 


Offline Nali2001

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2008, 11:05:38 PM »
Oh and here is a video of what I mean:

http://www.mediafire.com/?01jmhtwy22x

Regards,
Steven


Offline Getca

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #49 on: October 31, 2008, 10:00:01 AM »
 ??? ??? ???

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #49 on: October 31, 2008, 10:00:01 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Kator01

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 829
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #50 on: October 31, 2008, 01:31:17 PM »
Hi Getca,

no, it is showing wrong values even with sinus-waveform. I had a much better one form ELV. But even this one had a measurement-error of 10 - 15 %. They are al made in China and  have simply wrong software which returns false values of real wattage based on a wrong the phase-shift-angle-calculation. I state here strongly agian not to use these type of devices, but rely only on scope-measurements. I have given you the Kanarev-Link. All is written in there. You have even the advantage to read his papers in original language

Why do I get involved here is simply to avoid that you spent time barking at the wrong tree.

I estimate this configuration as a good concept . . . but please use true measurement-techniques and not incandescent light-bulbs for output-proof, only linear-resistors and voltage-measurement across these resistors
with scope.
Needless to say that JLN-Labs was presenting the biggest failure with his MEG. He used neons. What a blunder.

Regards

Kator

Offline Kator01

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 829
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #51 on: October 31, 2008, 01:37:24 PM »
Hi Getca,

what are you frowning at ?

Kator

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #51 on: October 31, 2008, 01:37:24 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Nali2001

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #52 on: October 31, 2008, 02:16:37 PM »
Looks like a Full wave bridge rectifier on a heatsink to me.
Only it is used in half wave.


Offline Getca

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #53 on: October 31, 2008, 02:49:25 PM »
I estimate this configuration as a good concept . . . but please use true measurement-techniques and not incandescent light-bulbs for output-proof, only linear-resistors and voltage-measurement across these resistors with scope.

Hello Kator...Why not lamp-bulbs? It's just non-linear load. What's the problem. Yes, I used something linear-resistors, but I couldn't see a diference. The MEG device was working correctly. Don't forget the MEG isn't a transformer and can work with output short circuit without input current rising. You are right about the scope, but Ivanov's measurement is correct and it's true. If You don't believe ask Altium. Well, how do I understand this one:
what are you frowning at ?
Kator

Don't You talk about the Ivanofv's MEG picture? If it's so I have shown a rectifier by a red arrow and if You spend some time thinking, You can get the true about the control coils driving. In my opinion there isn't any kind of switching electronics.

Regards...
Rossen

Offline nievesoliveras

  • elite_member
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1996
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #54 on: October 31, 2008, 06:16:54 PM »
Hi!

@nali2001

I saw the video and it raised several questions in my mind.

1. Is the transistor showed on the graphic PNP or NPN?
2. The capacitor is 1uf, but what is the voltage?
3. The diode is germanium or 1n4007?
4. How many turns are on the coil?

Jesus

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #54 on: October 31, 2008, 06:16:54 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Nali2001

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #55 on: October 31, 2008, 07:22:06 PM »
1: A irfp250 npn fet was used at 24v 50% duty.
2: The voltage of the cap was 100v max. All together 1mf was needed for 'best wave', but ya need to tune the cap which means maybe in you setup you would need 2mf or 100mf/ depends on freq/volt/pulse width. Just connect a scope and add or remove caps until you get what you want. Anyway the 'oscillating' sine voltage that is produced is many time higher than the initial voltage input. One other thing the caps must be foil or run caps. And not electrolytic caps since have a fixed polarity.
3: The diode can be anything that supports the volts (and amps in real use) I think I used a Byv95c http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/61974/GE/BYV95C.html But any cheap diode will do use 600v or 800v types or something to be sure. Not that important in these '1watt' tests.
4: Don't know how many turns, was not all that important at the time, the test was to show the effect but If I have to make a guess I'd say 500wraps of 0.8mm wire.

Offline nievesoliveras

  • elite_member
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1996
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #56 on: October 31, 2008, 08:57:07 PM »
Hi!

Thank you nali2001!
I have another question if it is not too much to ask.
If I dont have an oscilloscope. Is there anyway to know the values of the capacitance I need?

Jesus


Offline Nali2001

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #57 on: October 31, 2008, 11:07:51 PM »
Hmm well, you could use a volt meter (I prefer analogue) to see which value cap gives the biggest peak to peak sine wave voltage.
But a max voltage peak is not really the idea behind this pulse-to-sine method in meg use. You need the right value cap so that the sine it produces correctly 'connects up' with the next dc pulse. And only a scope can 'show' this to ya. If you have some spare cash I recommend to get yourself a second hand scope http://shop.ebay.com/items/__oscilloscope_W0QQ_nkwZoscilloscopeQ20QQ_cqrZtrueQQ_nkwuscZocciloscope or a usb scope. I have(and a old analogue one): http://shop.ebay.com/items/?_nkw=dso-2090&_sacat=0&_fromfsb=&_trksid=m270.l1313&_odkw=2090&_osacat=0 The software has some very handy functions like real time rms calculation form strange waveforms and such. Comes with two probes as well.

Offline Nali2001

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #58 on: November 01, 2008, 12:02:32 AM »
That your transformer with diode was lighting the bulb is because regular transformers can't handle dc (half wave) transformation. If you pulse a core constantly at one input polarity it will in between pulses not 'reset' or flip it's polity and so always tend to stay in a 90% magnetized state, even in between pulses. That means it saturates in a blink of an eye and start pulling massive amps. Those amps were pulled through your bulb so it lit up. That is why there is ac, so that the polarity of the core is inverted each cycle which causes good field change and so good output/performance. Also it will in ac set up a back emf against itself so when unloaded it only draws one watt or so. Simple to test, put half wave ac in a transformer and it saturated with a few volts/ and whop the amps sky rocket. And yes if a core is saturated it can pull 10amps+ easily(no limit). You then only have dc resistance on your coil. So your 100watt core was most very likely pulling more than that. In a sense you made a 'saturable reactor' or else know as a 'Magnetic amplifier' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_amplifier Where the saturation level of the core acts as a switch(regulator) for the to-be-regulated ac power. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturable_reactor


Lets call back emf> Bemf
and a inductive collapse/flyback> inductive collapse

Did the ohm test you described and don't really see anything unusual. Same value each combo. So maybe you used a core that hold a little permanent field?

Regards,
Steven



Hello Steven,

good question. I once had observed a weird effect when I loaded the primary of a step-down ring-transformer
( 230 V -> 12 Volt , 100 Watt ) with a halfwave, as this is shown in the hand-drawing above . Since I am a cautious person I put in series behind the diode a 230 V incandescant-bulb ( 30 Watt ). Now without diode the free wheeling transformer ( no load attached to the secondary) usually consumes just 0.7 watt and the bulb is dark.
But with diode the bulb was fully lit and the ring-transformer was humming and vibrating very loud with 50 Hz.

I stopped this experiment because at that time I thought it does not make sense to have that much of energy lost already at the primary with no load. Now the problem was that my watt-meter ( I bought this from a professional electronic-company here in germany) was showing more than 30 Watt input, so I knew then that it was reading false values.

You can try this yourself. I think something weird is happening with the Kick-Back-EMF after each halfe-wave which is not synchronized with the grid-frequency. If the kick-back-emf arrises it feeds back into the grid at the time the negative-part of the sinus-wave of the grid is on thus it is a grid-controlled back-feeding of the Kick-Back-EMF with no diode.
I now must repeat this experiment and find out more.

When I say Kick-Back-EMF then I do not refer to Back-EMF - this is something different.

In order to give you an impression of this  Kick-Back-EMF - especially in ring-transformers - you do the following experiment :

You take a transformer ( ring-trafo or a usual trafo of bigger size - at least 100 Watt ) measure with a analoge-Ohm-Meter  the primary until the scaler has reached his final position. Then - and you have to do this very quick in about 2 seconds  - you disconnect the probes and measure again but this time with changed probe- position on the leads. Tell me what you see.


Regards

Kator


Offline Kator01

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 829
Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #59 on: November 01, 2008, 12:04:54 AM »
Hi Getca,

lol !
why I asked you if you are frowning is because you just put these three images  ??? ??? ??? without any further
comments.

No, I don not question your results but just want to make it sure you use correct measurement-values.

Why not bulbs ? Because it is of no advantage since they have a non-linear inner resistance depending on voltage and current : you have to measure in the same way - as you stated wiht scope

1) Current
2) Voltage

to find the actual power

Many inventors just use the brightness of an incandescant bulb for cop > 1- proof.  And I assume you know this here :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb


Go to paragraph : Electrical characteritics

... and understand that you can - for example - have verly large current at lower voltage ( bulb is dark ) and lower current at higher Voltage ( bulb is lit ) but wattage is bigger in the dark input-bulb.

In order to have proof it is a must to use normal resistors and not bulbs.

I do stress this subject here because in one of the videos he showed  three bulbs in series lit up by the MEG.

Regards

Kator







Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: A truly overunity Transformer / Meg
« Reply #59 on: November 01, 2008, 12:04:54 AM »

 

Share this topic to your favourite Social and Bookmark site

Please SHARE this topic at: