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Author Topic: Solar cooling using "Hypo"  (Read 4466 times)

Offline joegatt

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  • Posts: 47
Solar cooling using "Hypo"
« on: August 06, 2005, 03:34:23 AM »
Here's a new idea for solar cooling. I call it the Hypo Conveyor. It uses Sodium Thiosulphate, also known as "Hypo" for its use in chemical based
photography.

Dissolving some Hypo crystals in an equal volume of water at room temperature results in a solution whose temperature is approximately 10Celcius lower than the surroundings. After being used as a coolant, the solution can then be dried back to crystals by evaporation in direct sunshine.? For continuous cooling, a system that keeps the hypo moving is desirable. However, as part of the cycle involves handling solid crystals, the chemical cannot be carried through a pipe in the same way used for fluid coolants.

A conveyor belt would have to be set up to keep the coolant moving. It would be difficult to construct a conveyer belt with hundreds of tiny pockets to trap droplets of the solution. So a simpler approach would be to absorb the solution in a conveyer belt made of string or cloth.

Regards
Joseph

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Solar cooling using "Hypo"
« on: August 06, 2005, 03:34:23 AM »

Offline electrospark

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  • Posts: 8
Re: Solar cooling using "Hypo"
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2014, 04:04:17 PM »
i am not familiar with chemistry but it sure looks interesting!  :P

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline MarkE

  • Hero Member
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  • Posts: 6831
Re: Solar cooling using "Hypo"
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2014, 05:50:44 PM »
Here's a new idea for solar cooling. I call it the Hypo Conveyor. It uses Sodium Thiosulphate, also known as "Hypo" for its use in chemical based
photography.

Dissolving some Hypo crystals in an equal volume of water at room temperature results in a solution whose temperature is approximately 10Celcius lower than the surroundings. After being used as a coolant, the solution can then be dried back to crystals by evaporation in direct sunshine.? For continuous cooling, a system that keeps the hypo moving is desirable. However, as part of the cycle involves handling solid crystals, the chemical cannot be carried through a pipe in the same way used for fluid coolants.

A conveyor belt would have to be set up to keep the coolant moving. It would be difficult to construct a conveyer belt with hundreds of tiny pockets to trap droplets of the solution. So a simpler approach would be to absorb the solution in a conveyer belt made of string or cloth.

Regards
Joseph
When you get to a design, you can compare that to solar powered adsorption based heat pumps for cost, complexity, and performance.

 

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