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Author Topic: Background radiation reciever  (Read 966 times)

Offline sm0ky2

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Background radiation reciever
« on: December 08, 2017, 01:59:58 AM »
hey guys
I don't want to bore you with 30 pages of math, to show you how I got here.
So I'll make this short and simple.
This was derived by solving a series of equations regarding cosmic background radiation.
And applying this information to half-wave antenna theory (with k-factor compensation)


What I find is (mathematically) that a half-wave antenna with a (half) wave length of:


0.5mm (0.25mm each side)


Should receive limitless free energy from the cosmos.


Directly from background radiation.
Zero-point energy.


An array of such antennas can be scaled up to any power requirements.
(may have to be a very large array?)


It's very tiny, so I will need to procure a micrometer before I begin experimenting
Just wanted to throw this out there.


Cosmic radiation frequency is among the most powerful waves in the microwave spectrum.
And are present in every part of the known universe. Permeate every space, every material.
If we are able to create this type of reciever, it could be a game changer.


Thanks for your time. Let me know your thoughts.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Background radiation reciever
« on: December 08, 2017, 01:59:58 AM »

Offline jojo500

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2017, 10:52:26 AM »
with 1mm wavelength you are at round about 299,8 GHz  hm..
could be pretty intresting to play with

all the best jojo

Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2017, 07:53:04 PM »
Isn't antenna size should be comparable to a wavelength?
In this case we should be talking about angstroms, not mm.
Or you have some kind of a trick?

Offline jojo500

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2017, 08:12:09 PM »
he was talking about half wave  antenna 0,5mm so wavelength is 1mm
so freq is  about 299,8 ghz.
how ever in that range your far away from doing triks of any kind  (only my 2cent and sure not the absolutly known and best)

have fun

Offline telecom

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2017, 11:44:15 PM »
he was talking about half wave  antenna 0,5mm so wavelength is 1mm
so freq is  about 299,8 ghz.
how ever in that range your far away from doing triks of any kind  (only my 2cent and sure not the absolutly known and best)

have fun
Except I doubt that there is any background radiation at this frequency.
Haven't he mentioned cosmic rays?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2017, 11:44:15 PM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2017, 02:01:07 AM »




The data comes from 1986 NASA spacelab,
and 4 other probes since then. (3 are also NASA’s)
One is a Russian science team.


What I considered the ‘most accurate’ is the one I
ultimately took, actuall values for the 0-point frequency
are slightly different, depending on the base values.


K-factor of the antenna assumes a wire width greater
than 1/8mm, and thus 0.94 was taken.


Base values of the frequency spectrum were taken at


2.754 Kelvin, known and identifiable signals filtered out.
That which remains was then further deduced
Leaving a singular frequency of approx 160.2338Ghz
A wavelength of 1.063mm
Applying the K-factor places us close to 1
Half-wave (dipole) antenna =0.5
This is a microwave receiver, a simple rectifier should
do the trick.
Approximate photonic energy available is
~0.0006626534 Ev x freq. x T x #of antennas
Being as tiny as they are..... I imagine we could fit
a large array in a small space.






Offline Bob Smith

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2017, 04:43:33 AM »
I wonder if quartz crystals could be manufactured (just like they are for providing precise oscillations in electronic watches) to the specs needed for such an antenna array. If you had the right sized quartz crystal, would it not resonate, perhaps better than any metal?  If this were a viable means for harvesting background cosmic radiation, the manufacturing industry would already be in place (from watchmaking), and would probably welcome such a new market, given the drop in watch purchases in favour of cell phones as time pieces.
I may be way off the mark, but for what it's worth.
Bob

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2017, 04:43:33 AM »
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Offline blueplanet

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2017, 05:29:16 AM »
It is wasting of time to use microwave antennas to harvest cosmic radiations. They will not work for thz range either.

Crystals may not be the right choice.... but it also depends on what crystals you are talking about. There must be some chemicals highly responsive to cosmic radiations.

I believe the some people have already got the answers.

Offline blueplanet

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2017, 06:03:07 AM »
The cosmic energy measurable by sensitive microwave electronics is the so-called noise or white noise.
Unfortunately, this energy is not so white to an extent that it can be easily measured at terahertz or microwave frequencies.
Noise from free space is easy to found but its energy is usually too little to do meaningful work.
The k-factor from NASA is meaningless because most of the microwave measuring instrument has a very low noise floor.

Offline Bob Smith

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2017, 06:07:49 AM »
Lahkovsky's multiwave oscillator comes to mind as well, but that's veering off topic, so I won't say more.
Bob

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2017, 06:07:49 AM »
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Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2017, 11:35:00 AM »
@blueplanet


It’s GHz, not Thz.
The K-factor is not a NASA thing,
the concept itself was brought forth from the radio industry
and antenna design theory.


It is an ‘adjustment’ to antenna length based on the frequency shift
caused by variances in antenna thickness.
The signal changes slightly through the metal
So we change the length to compensate, reducing interference.

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2017, 11:54:08 AM »
On the quartz receiver:


This idea sparked my interest, though upon searching
I am finding a bunch of escatalogical ‘crystal healing’
boxes, not sure the purpose (or if they do anything at all)


Then I find an interesting paper written by the guys at Berkeley
apparently they are using quartz-based receivers to convert
ionic plasma discharge into electricity.


As we know from the electric machines, ionic discharge radiates
at RF and microwave frequencies.
So there may be something there.


Offline blueplanet

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2017, 12:52:45 PM »
THz usually refers to the frequency band from 0.1Thz to 2 Thz. Of course i know what k-factor is but this is not an issue. If you have realized any cosmic energy harvesting device, please kindly post it here.  I would love to have a look.




@blueplanet


It’s GHz, not Thz.
The K-factor is not a NASA thing,
the concept itself was brought forth from the radio industry
and antenna design theory.


It is an ‘adjustment’ to antenna length based on the frequency shift
caused by variances in antenna thickness.
The signal changes slightly through the metal
So we change the length to compensate, reducing interference.

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2017, 01:23:38 PM »
Turns out the ‘quartz antenna’ are actually metal antennas
a quartz coating is applied to protect the metal from
high-temp ionic plasma discharge.


The only thing close to a ‘quartz antenna’ is a doped-silicone
contaminated to the point of conductivity. (0.5-15 ohms)
At least that I’ve uncovered so far.


I’m not sure if pure quartz can be used to receive microwaves.
if this was a thing, we would probably observe all quartz acting
as tuned-frequency receivers, based on their physical dimensions?
I don’t know....








Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2017, 01:38:40 PM »
I plan to build a test-bed array, I need to work out
a few details, to accurately fabricate precise dipoles
of this tiny size.
But, the physics supports the operation.
It’s really a matter of building a large enough array
that the reception becomes ‘useful’


What is ‘useful’???


Well basically it comes down to this:


1.06157 x10^-13 J/s
Or roughly one trillion dipole antennas per Watt
of continuous power.


This may be unfeasible.
Of course if we could build this, each unit would produce
24 Watt-hrs of electricity per day.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Background radiation reciever
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2017, 01:38:40 PM »

 

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