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Author Topic: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs  (Read 22064 times)

Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #75 on: May 25, 2017, 07:16:20 AM »
Hi all, i will be posting updates on this 3 battery setup very often, at least everyday if i can.
The results keep getting more interesting.
I am finding, that it seems best to place all 3 batteries in parallel, to equalize them, after every test run or use.
This reveals some interesting things, that may not be apparent, if we only add up the resting voltages after a test run.
When we place them all in parallel to equalize, it shows us a more true state of charge of all 3 batteries and keeps any one battery from falling too far below any other battery.
As for the slowly improving results i am seeing, i think that the power being extracted from this setup, is probably within an ideal range for these size and type of batteries.
I have made similar tests with these batteries previously, in a 3 battery setup also, though i think i was drawing far too much power for these batteries.
Also, this dual circuit is different also than previous circuits, the capacitors could be helping transfer the charge more efficiently into the charge battery as well.
So i ran the dual circuit again for 4 hours this time, for around 120 watt/hours total so far and the batteries are all in equalization mode again.
And yet again, the voltages overall, are slowly climbing.
I will let it equalize overnight again, though i can see where it is going.
Two of the batteries will drop somewhat by morning and then a little more after they are disconnected from parallel equalization mode, however, they are climbing in voltage, that is for sure.
A = 12.565 volts
B = 12.57 volts
C = 12.565 volts
Total = 37.7 volts
We shall see what the voltage settles to tomorrow and after they have rested after being disconnected from equalization.
Your thoughts are very welcome.
peace love light

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline magnetman12003

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #76 on: May 28, 2017, 04:08:17 AM »
Hi all, was posting about this particular oscillator light in another thread, felt it was good enough for its own thread.
It's the basic joule thief style circuit, using gutted 12 volt led bulbs rated at 7 watts from ebay.
The bulbs did contain a boost circuit inside them, to boost from 12 volts to around 21-24 volts dc, of course i removed that circuit from each bulb, for added efficiency.
The setup really is putting out a very good amount of light.
I was previously using a small number of turns on the ferrite c-core, then used many more coil layers and increased efficiency even further.
When looking at a Phillips 40 watt equivalent led bulb in a nearby can light, it is not much brighter than one of the 6000k pure white led bulbs.
Here is a drawing and some pics.
peace love light
  Looking at your 12 volt circuit I see you use a 450 volt, 150uf capacitor.  I have many 100uf, 450 volt capacitors.  Would one of them do just as well or would I run into problems?


Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #77 on: May 28, 2017, 05:56:02 PM »
Hi magnetman, one of those capacitors should be ok.
The other PNP transistor circuit is using a 330uF-200 volt capacitor and it needs more base current drive ( 2.5 Kohm compared to 5 Kohm ) to match the other circuits led bulb brightness, so it may be because the capacitor is a little more than double the capacity value.
So i would say, use the minimum capacitor uF value you can, but not too small, as it does help boost the output quite a bit it seems.
Remember, I'm using the gutted 5.5 watt-120 volt led bulb type at this time.
Each capacitor in the dual circuit, is showing around 55 volts dc.
The dual circuit is at 9.1 watts now, though that can be lowered with matching capacitors.
The setup now has all matching led bulbs, 8 of them, though i can say now, it is like the sun blazing up here. 8)
I tested one of the warm white 12 volt bulbs the other night, without any modifications.
And on a 12 volt battery, while it was drawing 6.5 watts, it had no where near the practical illumination of these 8 modified led bulbs, it was like a spit in the wind. ???
peace love light
Edit: I was able to dig up a 450 volt-120uF capacitor and it did reduce the base current needed on the PNP transistor and was able to raise the resistance to 3 Kohm and still match the other led bulb circuit.
Both circuits are drawing 350 milliamps and a total of 700 milliamps at 11.74 volts or 8.2 watts and outputting the same light intensity.
Maybe the PNP transistor is a little different and/or other variables, causing the need for the lower base resistance.

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #78 on: May 29, 2017, 01:55:17 AM »
Hi magnetman, one of those capacitors should be ok.
The other PNP transistor circuit is using a 330uF-200 volt capacitor and it needs more base current drive ( 2.5 Kohm compared to 5 Kohm ) to match the other circuits led bulb brightness, so it may be because the capacitor is a little more than double the capacity value.
So i would say, use the minimum capacitor uF value you can, but not too small, as it does help boost the output quite a bit it seems.
Remember, I'm using the gutted 5.5 watt-120 volt led bulb type at this time.
Each capacitor in the dual circuit, is showing around 55 volts dc.
The dual circuit is at 9.1 watts now, though that can be lowered with matching capacitors.
The setup now has all matching led bulbs, 8 of them, though i can say now, it is like the sun blazing up here. 8)
I tested one of the warm white 12 volt bulbs the other night, without any modifications.
And on a 12 volt battery, while it was drawing 6.5 watts, it had no where near the practical illumination of these 8 modified led bulbs, it was like a spit in the wind. ???
peace love light
Edit: I was able to dig up a 450 volt-120uF capacitor and it did reduce the base current needed on the PNP transistor and was able to raise the resistance to 3 Kohm and still match the other led bulb circuit.
Both circuits are drawing 350 milliamps and a total of 700 milliamps at 11.74 volts or 8.2 watts and outputting the same light intensity.
Maybe the PNP transistor is a little different and/or other variables, causing the need for the lower base resistance.
  Hi,
I got my new 12 volt regulated 360 watt power supply up and running.  Tested 9 twelve volt 7 watt led bulbs and one 5 watt bulb in parallel. Totals 68 watts.   Voltage  11.73  current 4.99 amps.
Like looking into the sun the bulbs were that bright.  All of them   Totals 58.53 watts.  I saw your setup did a lot better so I am building it now.  I also bought a lux meter to check brightness levels.
.


Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #79 on: May 29, 2017, 04:28:54 AM »
Hi magnetman, If you are going to use the 12 volt led bulbs, i removed the inner circuitry in my tests and had decent results, though did not develop it much further.
Though these 120 volt rated modified led bulbs I'm using now, are working very well with this setup.
There is absolutely no doubt, each of these led bulbs in this setup, is outputting much more light than 1 watt worth or 81 lumens.
I would say, each bulb is outputting at least 3.5 watts worth of light or around 285 lumens per bulb.
So that is a total of around 2280 lumens.
That is close to 3, 60 watt incandescent bulbs and it does look like that much light.
peace love light

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #79 on: May 29, 2017, 04:28:54 AM »
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Offline magnetman12003

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #80 on: June 01, 2017, 07:19:40 AM »
Hi all, was posting about this particular oscillator light in another thread, felt it was good enough for its own thread.
It's the basic joule thief style circuit, using gutted 12 volt led bulbs rated at 7 watts from ebay.
The bulbs did contain a boost circuit inside them, to boost from 12 volts to around 21-24 volts dc, of course i removed that circuit from each bulb, for added efficiency.
The setup really is putting out a very good amount of light.
I was previously using a small number of turns on the ferrite c-core, then used many more coil layers and increased efficiency even further.
When looking at a Phillips 40 watt equivalent led bulb in a nearby can light, it is not much brighter than one of the 6000k pure white led bulbs.
Here is a drawing and some pics.
peace love light
  Regarding the 11+ volts and 330 milliamps you posted on your 12 volt drawing-- Was that reading taken between your 12 volt power supply output and your powered setup or was it taken across one of your lit bulbs on the setup output??

Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #81 on: June 01, 2017, 07:21:50 PM »
Hi magnetman, the 11.8 volts was taken at the power supply output, NOT the capacitor.
The capacitor voltage was a little above 20 volts i think.
peace love light

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #81 on: June 01, 2017, 07:21:50 PM »
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Offline magnetman12003

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #82 on: June 03, 2017, 04:47:03 AM »
Hi magnetman, the 11.8 volts was taken at the power supply output, NOT the capacitor.
The capacitor voltage was a little above 20 volts i think.
peace love light
[/quote
Does moving the ferrite core in and out of the coil make a difference in the brightness of the bulbs or adjusting the resistor  value on the base of the transistor in the 12 volt setup??  Which of the two will effect bulb output brightness the most?

Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #83 on: June 03, 2017, 05:07:03 AM »
Hi magnetman, moving the ferrite core does affect the brightness.
And of course, different base resistor values will vary the brightness.
The base resistor affects brightness the most.
peace love light

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #84 on: June 05, 2017, 03:09:36 AM »
Hi magnetman, moving the ferrite core does affect the brightness.
And of course, different base resistor values will vary the brightness.
The base resistor affects brightness the most.
peace love light
I am having a hard time understanding just why almost the same voltage 12 volts and very low current will light up the bulbs very brightly.  As compared to a direct connection to the power source which puts out 12 volts and much current.  Can you explain what's happening??

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #84 on: June 05, 2017, 03:09:36 AM »
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Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #85 on: June 05, 2017, 05:52:15 AM »
Hi magnetman, which circuit are you speaking of, that uses 12 volts and uses very low current and lights bulbs brightly.
Just want to be sure, as I wouldn't want to mislead.
peace love light

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #86 on: June 06, 2017, 01:46:38 AM »
Hi magnetman, which circuit are you speaking of, that uses 12 volts and uses very low current and lights bulbs brightly.
Just want to be sure, as I wouldn't want to mislead.
peace love light
I am speaking of that circuit that delivers 11 plus volts and 333 milliamperes of current.  How can that setup deliver the same light output as a 11plus volt say 4 amps of current?


Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #87 on: June 06, 2017, 09:54:01 PM »
Hi magnetman, ok, i'm clear on your question now.
I'm not sure it delivers the same light output and I doubt it does.
Though it does output good light for the input power used.
I think one of the main reasons for the efficiency, is because in this particular setup, it is using a photo flash type capacitor to collect the radiant spikes, from the coils collapsing field.
This type of capacitor is said to have an electret effect, where it tends to want to recharge itself, this pushes the capacitor voltage higher in voltage and allows brighter led light.
This type of capacitor has very low resistance or esr and loves these high voltage, low current radiant spikes.
The radiant spikes into the capacitor, are also encouraging this type of capacitor to create more of that elecret effect.
Without the photo flash type capacitor in place, the led light output is not as good, maybe half the brightness.
Also, the coil/core plays a roll of course, with any particular ferrite core or coil, there is a sweet spot as far as frequency and duty cycle.
I hope that helps, what are your thoughts on why it is so efficient.
peace love light

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #88 on: June 07, 2017, 03:50:37 AM »
Hi magnetman, ok, i'm clear on your question now.
I'm not sure it delivers the same light output and I doubt it does.
Though it does output good light for the input power used.
I think one of the main reasons for the efficiency, is because in this particular setup, it is using a photo flash type capacitor to collect the radiant spikes, from the coils collapsing field.
This type of capacitor is said to have an electret effect, where it tends to want to recharge itself, this pushes the capacitor voltage higher in voltage and allows brighter led light.
This type of capacitor has very low resistance or esr and loves these high voltage, low current radiant spikes.
The radiant spikes into the capacitor, are also encouraging this type of capacitor to create more of that elecret effect.
Without the photo flash type capacitor in place, the led light output is not as good, maybe half the brightness.
Also, the coil/core plays a roll of course, with any particular ferrite core or coil, there is a sweet spot as far as frequency and duty cycle.
I hope that helps, what are your thoughts on why it is so efficient.
peace love light


What type of photo flash capacitor did you use? I see there are many types of caps.


Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #89 on: June 07, 2017, 07:00:53 AM »
Hi magnetman, correction, i am using a jamicon low esr electrolytic taken from a power supply and a KMG.
Probably good enough, since the capacitors are not being dumped, though true photo flash capacitors might work better.
I didn't have matching caps around, so the jamicon is a 450volt-150uF and KMG is 450 volt-120uF, though both are low esr, just not photo flash rated.
peace love light

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Oscillator Powering 6 Modified Led bulbs
« Reply #89 on: June 07, 2017, 07:00:53 AM »

 

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