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Author Topic: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS  (Read 15370 times)

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #45 on: April 08, 2017, 10:12:34 PM »
Hi magnetman, thanks for the reply.
I used the SCR test circuit with 12 volt battery, 12 volt incandescent bulb and 290 ohm resistor to gate, to check and see if it was ok, it is ok.
I then rewired the neon and SCR capacitor dump section, just like the test circuit and still no dumping happening.
I have a different oscillator than yours magnetman, using the meissner oscillator to charge the capacitor.
Still, i do not understand why this is not working, maybe the neon i have is not giving enough current into the gate, compared to the neon bulb you are using.
It's one of those green radio shack neons, with plastic encapsulated.
It's this neon. https://www.radioshack.com/products/radioshack-120-volt-neon-green-lamp-2-pack
peace love light
When I was still in the building stages of this particular circuit I tried out many different neon bulbs and found out very quickly that a lot of them turned black rapidly and burned out. The transistor  gave it up also.  Then I tried the B7A neon bulbs and had no further trouble. They never turned black and failed.  So far the finished circuit I have shown has never failed me yet.    I would love to try one of those USB battery chargers that steps up A SINGLE 1.5 VOLT AA battery to 5 volts output.  Connect that to the circuit and see if the 8  seven watt bulbs lite up.  Presently I am using a single 18650 3.7 volt battery inside a USB charger to do this. Like to buy locally instead of out of China.  Know of any retailer?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #45 on: April 08, 2017, 10:12:34 PM »

Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #46 on: April 08, 2017, 10:56:00 PM »
....
maybe the neon i have is not giving enough current into the gate, compared to the neon bulb you are using.
....

Hi Tyson,

Yes this may explain why the thyristor is not turning on. Magnetman's neon type, B7A has a 2mA current when flashes
http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/1657095.pdf ,  common neon bulbs normally have around 1mA or less current.

Your NTE5554 http://www.nteinc.com/specs/5500to5599/pdf/nte5550_58.pdf  is not specified for a minimum gate trigger current, only for a maximum 40 mA, and typically 25 mA,  while the BTW69-1200 is specified as minimum 8mA but this latter type is obviously more sensitive then 8mA the data sheet says if I accept the 2 mA current for the B7A. Of course this 2 mA can be higher if the DC voltage in C1 is higher than 120V in magnetman's setup.

If you have not managed to trigger your NTE thyristor in the meantime, I would suggest considering crowbar circuits that use thyristors, you surely know about such circuits. Here the gate trigger current comes via a Zener diode chosen for the voltage levels involved. See this link: http://axotron.se/index_en.php?page=26

If you happen to have some 15V or 24V Zener diodes at hand, you could put a few of them in series and replace the neon bulb with them. The resistor R1 between the gate and the cathode of the SCR could be say 1-2 kOhm and for Zener safety connect a 4.7kOhm to 10 kOhm resistor in series with the Zener_series_string to limit Zener current. This way you would have higher current injection into the gate than you have from the neon now (maybe the Radioshack neon lamps have a built in series resistor to limit current and this reduces the possibility of triggering the SCR even more?)

By the way, what DC voltage is collected in your capacitor C1 from your oscillator?  80 - 100V?

Gyula


Offline TinselKoala

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #47 on: April 08, 2017, 11:17:51 PM »
Neons, when the plasma is present, have practically zero resistance. Hence they will draw whatever the current source can supply, even to the point of violent self-destruction. The current specifications like 2mA for the B7A are nominal currents,  that must be limited to that value by the use of a resistor. The B7A has a 30 k current-limiting resistor built in, according to the data sheet linked above,  and the RadioShack 120V neon indicator assemblies also have a resistor in the housing.

Quote
common neon bulbs normally have around 1mA or less current.
It is more correct to say that these neons will glow nicely at 1mA or less current, but the current must be limited to this value externally, either by a current-limiting resistor or by using a power source that cannot deliver more current.

If they are allowed to draw more current than the nominal value, several things happen. First the color shifts from the usual reddish-orange toward more red and eventually purple, and if a power arc forms between the electrodes with enough current, they go white and then they explode. Second, with more than the nominal current they heat up, and the electrodes start vaporizing and cause the glass to become blackened or even totally black as the electrode material is sputter-coated onto the glass. I'm sure everyone who have built Bedini circuits with neons have seen their neons glow purplish at times and over time they see the glass become blackened.

If the neon is used to trigger the thyristor, I would suggest using a bare neon, like NE-2 or NE-2a, with no series resistor.

Offline Ispeed

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #48 on: April 09, 2017, 08:51:22 AM »
Hi mangnetman,

I can see a very good job done by you, weldone. please am from nigeria and am not an electric guy, i want to know if you can help me build a working system board and put the schematic drawing then send it to nigeria i would appricate and ready to pay for the cost. Thanks.

N.B. Please how long does the battery last before it rundown.


Offline markdansie

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #49 on: April 09, 2017, 03:31:22 PM »
Hi all
I have one really dumb question to ask. How long does a 18650 3.7 volt battery last running these lights and what is the mA of the battery. I.E 2600?


Kind Regards
Mark

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #49 on: April 09, 2017, 03:31:22 PM »
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Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #50 on: April 09, 2017, 11:40:47 PM »
Hi all
I have one really dumb question to ask. How long does a 18650 3.7 volt battery last running these lights and what is the mA of the battery. I.E 2600?

Your question is not dumb. The 18650 3.7 volt 5800 ma battery is inside the USB charger that delivers 5 volts to the setup.  The 8 seven watt 12 volt bulbs will light up brightly for 5 minutes and all go out at one time.  Now using the same battery and charger I gave the battery a short rest where its not powering anything.  Then I can repeat the above again with same results.  I also did it a third time with same results!!!!!???  Really weird as you would think the battery would have given up on the first try.  Somehow the circuit is turning 5 volts to 12 with enough current to keep all bulbs lit.

Kind Regards
Mark

Offline markdansie

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #51 on: April 10, 2017, 09:30:18 AM »
Thanks for the feed back.
 
That makes a lot of sense given these lithiums can have a lot of bounce when exhausted.
You can also get commercial step up DC to Dc circuits and test them as a reference or control.


The amount of energy you are using in those 5 minute windows are easily achieved with a good quality Lithium battery .


Kind Regards
Mark

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #51 on: April 10, 2017, 09:30:18 AM »
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Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #52 on: April 11, 2017, 05:56:43 AM »
Thanks for the feed back.
 
That makes a lot of sense given these lithiums can have a lot of bounce when exhausted.
You can also get commercial step up DC to Dc circuits and test them as a reference or control.


The amount of energy you are using in those 5 minute windows are easily achieved with a good quality Lithium battery .


Kind Regards
Mark
  When I connected a 3.7 volt battery directly into the circuit input NO bulbs light up.  But put the same battery into a USB cell phone charger powering the circuit all 8 seven watt 12 volt  bulbs burn brightly then cut off after 5 minutes.  Rest the battery and can repeat many times.   Unable to exhaust the battery after numerous tries.

Offline TinselKoala

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #53 on: April 11, 2017, 06:00:15 AM »
I'm guessing here... but maybe the "cutoff" after five minutes is due to the USB charger's chip entering thermal shutdown mode, rather than anything happening to the battery.

You could test this by feeling the chip with your finger to see if it's excessively hot and if the charger starts up again after it cools. A q-tip with a little isopropyl alcohol (evaporates quickly from hot chips) can also be used.

Offline markdansie

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #54 on: April 11, 2017, 06:19:54 AM »
Hi TK
That is a pretty good guess. Some of the cheaper power banks do not use the thermal function but this makes the most sense.
Some of the nastier lithiums bounce a lot, the quality ones do not as much.
Kind Regards
Mark

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #54 on: April 11, 2017, 06:19:54 AM »
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Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #55 on: April 11, 2017, 06:19:47 PM »
I'm guessing here... but maybe the "cutoff" after five minutes is due to the USB charger's chip entering thermal shutdown mode, rather than anything happening to the battery.

You could test this by feeling the chip with your finger to see if it's excessively hot and if the charger starts up again after it cools. A q-tip with a little isopropyl alcohol (evaporates quickly from hot chips) can also be used.
I was wandering if there is a larger  circuit that uses a AA (1.5 volts) battery to deliver 5 volts USB power.  This circuit would have to have  components that would not be subject to thermal shutdown  such as the miniature USB circuits that are common.  I would love to see how long a common AA alkaline battery would last in this circuit rather than the 18650 battery  A"" heavy duty"" circuit for the 18650 3.7 volt battery would be nice also.

Offline URFA

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #56 on: April 11, 2017, 09:49:18 PM »
Hi Magnetman.
Your setup very nice.
I made a similar setup to yours. I used a tesla coil as a radiant energy source. And I charge the capacitor through rectifier from tesla coil. Condenser filling with radiant energy  and discharge in my setup like yours. In my setup negative input and negative output similar to your setup but a little different,not connected directly. We must rest-created radiant energy to get it, then merge into the condenser and add the current. Radiant charges condenser instanly without wasting time you know. I did not use a thyristor in my setup. But I will use thyristors as soon as possible. I'm sure the result will be yours.

Here is my setup link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVTS6zmv7LE&t=18s

Input: 12V 0.1A
Output load 220V 18Watt Hologen bulb.( I burn about 12 bulbs in my experiment.Because I have enormous power for 18w bulb)


Best regards.


Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #57 on: April 12, 2017, 05:36:01 AM »
I'm guessing here... but maybe the "cutoff" after five minutes is due to the USB charger's chip entering thermal shutdown mode, rather than anything happening to the battery.

You could test this by feeling the chip with your finger to see if it's excessively hot and if the charger starts up again after it cools. A q-tip with a little isopropyl alcohol (evaporates quickly from hot chips) can also be used.
  I think you are correct about thermal shutdown as the test leads alligator clips get warm after 5 minutes.  I can imagine the miniature circuitry inside the USB charger getting hot delivering the current to the 8 bulbs then shutting down without burning up.   I am going to try a 5 volt power supply next to see what happens.

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #58 on: April 12, 2017, 05:46:13 PM »
  I think you are correct about thermal shutdown as the test leads alligator clips get warm after 5 minutes.  I can imagine the miniature circuitry inside the USB charger getting hot delivering the current to the 8 bulbs then shutting down without burning up.   I am going to try a 5 volt power supply next to see what happens.
    I just tried a plug in USB 5 volt device that is much larger than the miniature devices.  The setup powers 8 twelve volt 7 watt led  bulbs with no problem continuously!!  Latest video on the You tube.

https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=FbwxaSxw3jo


Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #59 on: April 12, 2017, 08:40:53 PM »
Hi URFA,

Thanks for showing your interesting setup. You use the word 'radiant energy', I respect that, though I prefer saying you use (volt-ampere) reactive power from a resonant (Tesla) LC circuit.   8)

Would you mind using your analog ampermeter set to 250mA DC range (instead of the 10A)? Just to see the 100 mA much better...  lol     
I know you did not claim anything and it is possible that your meter may be wrong in its 250mA DC range.

It would be good to estimate the output power your incandescent bulb receives periodically from the puffer capacitor(s) via the switching relay.  Have you done any attempt to measure the DC voltages across the capacitor(s) just before the discharge moment and just after it? This way the energy (hence power) used from the puffer caps could be estimated. 
I am just curious...  :)   I assume you may perhaps use a two stage switching at the output as per Doug Konzen? to separate the load from the source?

Thanks
Gyula

Hi Magnetman.
Your setup very nice.
I made a similar setup to yours. I used a tesla coil as a radiant energy source. And I charge the capacitor through rectifier from tesla coil. Condenser filling with radiant energy  and discharge in my setup like yours. In my setup negative input and negative output similar to your setup but a little different,not connected directly. We must rest-created radiant energy to get it, then merge into the condenser and add the current. Radiant charges condenser instanly without wasting time you know. I did not use a thyristor in my setup. But I will use thyristors as soon as possible. I'm sure the result will be yours.

Here is my setup link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVTS6zmv7LE&t=18s

Input: 12V 0.1A
Output load 220V 18Watt Hologen bulb.( I burn about 12 bulbs in my experiment.Because I have enormous power for 18w bulb)


Best regards.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #59 on: April 12, 2017, 08:40:53 PM »

 

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