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Author Topic: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS  (Read 23920 times)

Offline ramset

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #150 on: April 26, 2017, 11:53:30 PM »
Gyula
Just a cardboard box... no real leaks but no insulation ,the loss to ambient will be the guide here [final temp rise against  losses]

if DUT test gets hotter than control test running on same power input.
example
ten watt resistor will only raise temp in box to an ultimate temp against losses
if DUT makes Box hotter [same box same ambient temp] with less power than control test.

you have something to qualify the claim, caloric measurement is a rock solid science

I always like to run tests side by side [same size box at same time]

your suggestion is not being dismissed here ,its just that cardboard boxes and thermometers are everywhere, not everyone has a Lux meter [or needs to buy one]

and it can be done in minutes ,and once done it can be used to measure advancements

respectfully
Chet K

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #150 on: April 26, 2017, 11:53:30 PM »

Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #151 on: April 27, 2017, 12:10:07 AM »
Okay Chet, I understand, it indeed sounds simple and accurate.

On the lux meter:  if someone has such meter he places it near to the lamps on the table to have a steady value displayed on it in a position and from then on the meter remains untouched during the measurements. Then with a alternative switch the LEDs could be switched by hand to be fed from either the setup output or from directly the power supply.   
When there is no lux meter available, even an eyeball brightness comparison could be done to get a reasonable estimation of the power level coming from the power supply because in this setup a COP of 10 is involved.   (what I doubt, sorry)

Thanks
Gyula


Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #152 on: April 27, 2017, 09:08:16 PM »
Hi All,
Thought you might want to see the below experiment:

https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=zwu0RZ2pkjw
A 1.5 volt battery is powering 9 seven watt, 12 volt, led bulbs now through my setup.

I am now open for a substantial offer on my entire setup. I have all extra parts to exactly duplicate it.  Then whoever purchases it can run all the experiments suggested by others and I can take a rest while others put in their time and take it further.
Whoever needs it also buys about 150 pounds of different experimental parts that were accumulated leading up to the present setup. Need a pickup truck to haul all away unless you opt only for the setup itself.  I live in Michigan, USA  Pay Pal only PRIOR to purchase.

Offline ramset

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #153 on: April 27, 2017, 09:12:48 PM »
your link {you tube] seems broken ? although it could be my end.
thx
Chet
ps
Thanks to Gyula below



Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #154 on: April 27, 2017, 09:16:31 PM »
your link {you tube] seems broken ? although it could be my end.
thx
Chet

Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwu0RZ2pkjw

Gyula

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #154 on: April 27, 2017, 09:16:31 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Vickysong

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #155 on: May 02, 2017, 11:20:26 AM »
HKin.com is a business-to-business marketplace dedicated to support companies engaged in the Electronic Components Industry.
We act as a trading hub facilitating companies from all over the world to trade electronic components online. Our Supplier Directory provides comprehensive information enabling buyers to source manufacturers and suppliers in Hong Kong and Asia Pacific area.

www.hkinventory.com

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #156 on: May 02, 2017, 08:58:19 PM »
I have a question to ask:  I can power 9 seven watt 12 volt bulbs and get quite a good output with my setup.  I did notice that when I powered it directly using  a 12 volt 12 amp hour battery my bulbs burn with a intense light much brighter than anything I have experimented before with.

What kind of AC TO 12 volt DC power pack can replace the battery???  I noticed there are regulated and unregulated and with and without transformers.  I  want a unit that will not pulse the bulbs.  I  have 2 units already that do just that rated at 12 volts,6amps.  Someone point me in the right direction

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #156 on: May 02, 2017, 08:58:19 PM »
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Offline Cherryman

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #157 on: May 02, 2017, 09:15:45 PM »
I have a question to ask:  I can power 9 seven watt 12 volt bulbs and get quite a good output with my setup.  I did notice that when I powered it directly using  a 12 volt 12 amp hour battery my bulbs burn with a intense light much brighter than anything I have experimented before with.

What kind of AC TO 12 volt DC power pack can replace the battery???  I noticed there are regulated and unregulated and with and without transformers.  I  want a unit that will not pulse the bulbs.  I  have 2 units already that do just that rated at 12 volts,6amps.  Someone point me in the right direction


Maybe you can try aiming them at a solar panel?


Break of the plastic or glass bulbs, make them "spots" and see what kind of power you can harvest from the light and recharge the battery.


And do not forget that you can grow (indoor) veggies (or other) plants easily with those bulbs ( speaking from experience).


Maybe not the direction you asked for, I'm sorry, but keep up the good work!




Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #158 on: May 25, 2017, 05:08:49 AM »
I just ran a new 12 volt  power supply through my circuit.  I have 9 twelve volt 7 watt bulbs in parallel.
That's 63 total watts.  I had all bulbs at full brilliance and measured 4.63 volts and 1.21 amps where the power supply was connected to the ""Operating"" setup.    4.63 X 1.21 = 5.6023 Watts powering
63 watts. 
 

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #159 on: May 25, 2017, 08:09:18 PM »
I have an interesting question that someone might answer.  I just bought a 12 volt 30 amp 360 watt power unit.  What 12 volt battery would be its equivalent in amp hours and watts?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #159 on: May 25, 2017, 08:09:18 PM »
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Offline TinselKoala

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #160 on: May 25, 2017, 08:44:42 PM »
I have an interesting question that someone might answer.  I just bought a 12 volt 30 amp 360 watt power unit.  What 12 volt battery would be its equivalent in amp hours and watts?

You can't really compare a battery and a power supply in that way. The best you can do is to say that they both will put out 12 volts, for a while, into certain loads.
You don't say whether your power unit is a voltage regulated supply. If it isn't, its voltage will droop when connected to a heavy load.

The "Amp-Hour" is a measure of _energy capacity_ of a battery. The nominal voltage multiplied by the amp-hour rating gives "volt-amp hours" which, converted to seconds by multiplying by 3600 seconds per hour, gives the energy in Joules.
Since the power unit will continue to put out power for as long as you have it connected to the wall outlet, its "energy capacity" is "infinite". It won't run down as long as it's connected to the working mains!

Batteries, especially lead-acid types, have very low internal resistance, so the "watts" they can put out can be very very large if the load also has low resistance. Drop a wrench across the terminals and the battery may put out thousands of watts for a few seconds while it welds the wrench in place and then explodes. Connect it to a more reasonable load like a car brake light bulb and it will put out 25 watts, or whatever the bulb is rated for, until it gradually runs down. Your power unit is maxed out at 360 watts (that is, 12 volts at 30 amps, which means into a 0.4 ohm load,  IF it can actually meet its rating)  so you aren't likely to weld anything by connecting it to a direct short.

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #161 on: May 26, 2017, 07:29:16 PM »
You can't really compare a battery and a power supply in that way. The best you can do is to say that they both will put out 12 volts, for a while, into certain loads.
You don't say whether your power unit is a voltage regulated supply. If it isn't, its voltage will droop when connected to a heavy load.

The "Amp-Hour" is a measure of _energy capacity_ of a battery. The nominal voltage multiplied by the amp-hour rating gives "volt-amp hours" which, converted to seconds by multiplying by 3600 seconds per hour, ,
Since the power unit will continue to put out power for as long as you have it connected to the wall outlet, its "energy capacity" is "infinite". It won't run down as long as it's connected to the working mains!

Batteries, especially lead-acid types, have very low internal resistance, so the "watts" they can put out can be very very large if the load also has low resistance. Drop a wrench across the terminals and the battery may put out thousands of watts for a few seconds while it welds the wrench in place and then explodes. Connect it to a more reasonable load like a car brake light bulb and it will put out 25 watts, or whatever the bulb is rated for, until it gradually runs down. Your power unit is maxed out at 360 watts (that is, 12 volts at 30 amps, which means into a 0.4 ohm load,  IF it can actually meet its rating)  so you aren't likely to weld anything by connecting it to a direct short.


Hi, Thank you for all your information. I was using an unregulated power supply.
I now bought a ""voltage regulated"" 12 volt , 30 amp, 360 watt power supply.  How many 12 volt seven watt led bulbs can this  power supply light up continuously is my next question because that's my intent.  I had a lot of smaller power supply's pulse the bulbs in the past and would not continuously light them.


Offline TinselKoala

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #162 on: May 26, 2017, 09:33:51 PM »
To address your problem properly you will also need a good lightmeter so that you can tell the true brightness or light output power of your bulbs in each condition: Lit by straight DC voltage, or lit by your oscillator. You may also need some way to measure or show the power factor when using the oscillator.

It is very difficult to tell the true brightness of a bulb by eye alone, especially if they are bright. So perhaps you can light up 360/7 = 51 bulbs with the straight DC power output of your power supply (assuming it really can maintain 360 watts output at 12 volts), and perhaps you can light up more than that with the oscillator... but will they truly be as bright as the DC powered bulbs?

Of course, since your lighting needs are determined by what your eye can see rather than a lightmeter reading, perhaps it doesn't really matter, as long as you are getting enough light for your needs. But if you really want to do an energy balance measurement you need better instruments than your eyeballs alone.

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #163 on: May 27, 2017, 12:33:11 AM »
To address your problem properly you will also need a good lightmeter so that you can tell the true brightness or light output power of your bulbs in each condition: Lit by straight DC voltage, or lit by your oscillator. You may also need some way to measure or show the power factor when using the oscillator.

It is very difficult to tell the true brightness of a bulb by eye alone, especially if they are bright. So perhaps you can light up 360/7 = 51 bulbs with the straight DC power output of your power supply (assuming it really can maintain 360 watts output at 12 volts), and perhaps you can light up more than that with the oscillator... but will they truly be as bright as the DC powered bulbs?

Of course, since your lighting needs are determined by what your eye can see rather than a lightmeter reading, perhaps it doesn't really matter, as long as you are getting enough light for your needs. But if you really want to do an energy balance measurement you need better instruments than your eyeballs alone.

 I just bought a new lux/foot candle meter so I will use that and meter the light from a single bulb off a direct connection to my power supply. Will use that reading as a standard for readings later when many bulbs are powered.


Offline TinselKoala

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #164 on: May 27, 2017, 01:47:28 AM »
That's good! So you will no doubt build a light box and some kind of fixture, to exclude ambient light and to hold your bulb(s) at the same distance from the lightmeter's sensor for every measurement. I'll be looking forward to seeing your results!


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #164 on: May 27, 2017, 01:47:28 AM »

 

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