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Author Topic: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS  (Read 23899 times)

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #105 on: April 22, 2017, 01:27:34 AM »
Thanks very much man; whatever you choose to call this circuit, just make sure it's got your name on it! This invention can immortalize you!
Just today using only my LUMSING  5 volt USB 17 watt wall adapter I ran a few tests using the 9 seven watt 12 volt led bulbs once more.  During this test ALL bulbs burned brightly.  I found 5.19 volts/1.26 amps at the USB charger output. All bulbs lit.    I found 3.30 volts/1.26 amps across the C1 capacitor.  Once again this is with all bulbs lit.  So we have 6.5394 watts feeding this circuit- that's the output of the 17 watt USB wall adapter.  No wonder the adapter feels cold to the touch.   4.158 watts across the C1 shows the setup is using 2.3814 watts to power itself.  THE REAL QUESTION TO ASK IS HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE CONSIDERING THE FACT THAT CLOSE TO 63 WATTS ARE NEEDED  TO POWER THE BULBS?    4 TO 6+ WATTS SHOULD NOT DO THIS??

I hope everyone gets involved with this and it goes viral.  I only want to be noted as the person that used
tidbits of information from others and after adding my own thoughts I came up with this"" HYBRID"" circuit. I hope it works out for all mankind.  That's why I open sourced all info. 

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #105 on: April 22, 2017, 01:27:34 AM »

Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #106 on: April 22, 2017, 01:29:44 AM »

....
I gave up exploring what the setup will do with 12 volts after using the 5 volt wall type USB  adapter. Currently I am powering  nine-- seven watt -- 12 volt led bulbs totals 63 watts.  All lamps are brightly lit for some strange reason so I guess I will push on and see how many more can be lit the same way.  My Lumsing USB wall power adapter is rated at 5 volts at 3.4 amps.  THATS  17 WATTS DRIVING 63 WATTS??  CRAZY!!   The USB power adapter runs cold to the touch after long use!  Should I call this a power assister circuit??  Open for a good name.

Dear magnetman,

Indeed it sounds crazy (17W driving 63W) because you have not managed to measure the actual power drawn by the 9 LED bulbs.  As I wrote earlier, the voltage and current waveforms can be saw tooth shaped as the thyristor switch periodically discharges the C1 puffer capacitor and this waveform cannot be measured correctly by normal DMMs. 
Remember you reported 3.8V or so DC voltage measured inside one of a LED socket while the other LEDs were nicely lit  i.e. 3.8V or so voltage amplitude could not drive any such LED with nice brightness. 
This is why I tried to suggest using a second filter capacitor, C2 to filter and smooth the saw tooth voltage to be more DC like so that both the current and voltage values driving the LEDs could better be measured by a DMM once there is no oscilloscope available for you. 

Gyula


Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #107 on: April 22, 2017, 01:35:50 AM »
Hi magnetman,

you wrote:  "4.158 watts across the C1 shows the setup is using 2.3814 watts to power itself. "

it is okay that there is typo, it is 4.158 Volt across C1 what you measured by your DC voltmeter right?

This is what am saying: the saw tooth like waveform across C1 may fool the DC meter, very possible. 

Addition:  If I recall correctly, you already wrote somewhere that if you try to drive a 12V LED bulb from say the 5V USB device, it remains fully dark?  i.e. not working

Gyula

Just today using only my LUMSING  5 volt USB 17 watt wall adapter I ran a few tests using the 9 seven watt 12 volt led bulbs once more.  During this test ALL bulbs burned brightly.  I found 5.19 volts/1.26 amps at the USB charger output. All bulbs lit.    I found 3.30 volts/1.26 amps across the C1 capacitor.  Once again this is with all bulbs lit.  So we have 6.5394 watts feeding this circuit- that's the output of the 17 watt USB wall adapter.  No wonder the adapter feels cold to the touch.   4.158 watts across the C1 shows the setup is using 2.3814 watts to power itself.  THE REAL QUESTION TO ASK IS HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE CONSIDERING THE FACT THAT CLOSE TO 63 WATTS ARE NEEDED  TO POWER THE BULBS?    4 TO 6+ WATTS SHOULD NOT DO THIS??

I hope everyone gets involved with this and it goes viral.  I only want to be noted as the person that used
tidbits of information from others and after adding my own thoughts I came up with this"" HYBRID"" circuit. I hope it works out for all mankind.  That's why I open sourced all info.

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #108 on: April 22, 2017, 01:50:22 AM »
Hi magnetman,

you wrote:  "4.158 watts across the C1 shows the setup is using 2.3814 watts to power itself. "

it is okay that there is typo, it is 4.158 Volt across C1 what you measured by your DC voltmeter right?

This is what am saying: the saw tooth like waveform across C1 may fool the DC meter, very possible.

Gyula
3.30 volts x 1.26 amps = 4.158 watts across the C1 cap    6.5394 watts across the output of the USB adapter.  6.5394 - 4.158 = 2.3814  watts consumed by setup.  All measured by true RMS multi meter.


Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #109 on: April 22, 2017, 02:01:24 AM »
3.30 volts x 1.26 amps = 4.158 watts across the C1 cap    6.5394 watts across the output of the USB adapter.  6.5394 - 4.158 = 2.3814  watts consumed by setup.  All measured by true RMS multi meter.

Okay, I understand now how you calculated the 4.158 W across the C1 capacitor.

However, I disagree with the way you attempted to calculate the power drawn from C1 because the 1.26 A is the input from the 5V USB device.  You would have to measure the current at say its negative leg where it connects to the cathode (K) of the thyristor, at that point the ampermeter could be inserted and see the rms current. 
A question: the 3.3 V across C1 is a DC value or  rms AC value?

Thanks,
Gyula

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #109 on: April 22, 2017, 02:01:24 AM »
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Offline Naija

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #110 on: April 22, 2017, 01:34:25 PM »
We are missing the point of magnetman's invention. His work is NOT originally meant to be a normal dc bulb operation running on batteries (if this were so, there would not be the need for his circuit that took him 3 years to perfect). Okay, let us assume that his measurements are dead wrong and that the bulbs are actually drawing the required 63W; what explanation could be given to his testament that the 17W power pack powering the 63W of load has remained cold to touch after CONTINUOUS use? ???

Magnetman might not have all the equipment to professionally demonstrate his work and this is where those who do can come in. He has been very honest thus far, revealing all it takes to replicate his work. I think it is better to FIRST replicate his work and in doing this, we will find answers to our criticisms. In this respect, I appreciate Skywatchers effort to FIRST replicate this work. That is the sure way to go.

Offline Naija

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #111 on: April 22, 2017, 02:55:47 PM »
I hope everyone gets involved with this and it goes viral.  I only want to be noted as the person that used
tidbits of information from others and after adding my own thoughts I came up with this"" HYBRID"" circuit. I hope it works out for all mankind.  That's why I open sourced all info.

This is verily your work and you rightly deserve the sole credit of it. Even the well-respected Tesla started out with tidbits of information from others!

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #111 on: April 22, 2017, 02:55:47 PM »
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Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #112 on: April 22, 2017, 03:01:52 PM »
Dear Naija,

I am sorry if I seem to be naysayer, this is not my intention.  All I am saying is: we do not know
yet how much power actually goes into the paralleled 8 LED bulbs. We know correctly the input power.

A pulsed LED which is the case in this setup responds with increased brightness to peak currents
and this can be a misleading factor in estimating brightness by eye.  This property is okay and known for a LED
but the actual average or real power draw by the 8 LEDs is what should count when we claim a low input
and a higher than that output. 
I also appreciate Skywatcher's efforts and readyness for doing the measurements. Unfortunately he could not
replicate the exact setup magnetman built because he has not had the same 12V DC LED types but 120V ones,
and he has not used the switching thyristor yet, see here:
http://overunity.com/17200/3-7-volt-battery-powers-56-watts/msg504081/#msg504081  and
his measurement: http://overunity.com/17200/3-7-volt-battery-powers-56-watts/msg504293/#msg504293   
I cannot locate the same type of LEDs magnetman uses at other places than what he gave an ebay link and
the seller does not send those lamps to my country.
 
Anyway, I wish this setup magnetman has genuinely shared should fulfill everyones hopes.

Gyula

Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #113 on: April 22, 2017, 06:00:11 PM »
Dear Naija,

I am sorry if I seem to be naysayer, this is not my intention.  All I am saying is: we do not know
yet how much power actually goes into the paralleled 8 LED bulbs. We know correctly the input power.

A pulsed LED which is the case in this setup responds with increased brightness to peak currents
and this can be a misleading factor in estimating brightness by eye.  This property is okay and known for a LED
but the actual average or real power draw by the 8 LEDs is what should count when we claim a low input
and a higher than that output. 
I also appreciate Skywatcher's efforts and readyness for doing the measurements. Unfortunately he could not
replicate the exact setup magnetman built because he has not had the same 12V DC LED types but 120V ones,
and he has not used the switching thyristor yet, see here:
http://overunity.com/17200/3-7-volt-battery-powers-56-watts/msg504081/#msg504081  and
his measurement: http://overunity.com/17200/3-7-volt-battery-powers-56-watts/msg504293/#msg504293   
I cannot locate the same type of LEDs magnetman uses at other places than what he gave an ebay link and
the seller does not send those lamps to my country.
 
Anyway, I wish this setup magnetman has genuinely shared should fulfill everyones hopes.

Gyula
  Hi All,

I appreciate every ones input and those building this device. Always open for ideas. Will help everyone
that needs questions answered.

My best test equipment consists of two very accurate true RMS multi meters. I don't own a scope.  I don't know how far this may go.  Whoever might patent something like it later might keep me in mind and give something to a good charity. My main goal all along was to create a device that would enrich many lives without it being used with evil intent.  I tried to make it as simple as it gets and use older less expensive components.  The newer LED bulbs being the exception as well as the USB adapter. Also don't need the magnet now.

Offline Zephir

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #114 on: April 22, 2017, 06:08:16 PM »
Quote
best test equipment consists of two very accurate true RMS multi meters. I don't own a scope
Hi magnetman, I think you don't need any scope and I even think, that the usage of scope in overunity measurements is misleading, because its interpretation depends on power factor and many other things, which are difficult to follow. Once someone tells me, that he observed overunity with scope, then I'm getting suspicious automatically.

So if you measure the input/output current and voltage with reliable multimeter, then it's completely OK - but you should measure the DC current only, because the multimeters exhibit artifacts during measuring inharmonic signals. It requires to place large electrolytic capacitor in parallel to you multimeter for to measure the stable, sufficiently averaged signal. If you measure the AC signal, your should rectify with diode bridge first. If your overunity effect is robust, it should tolerate the voltage drop at diodes. Even the high quality RMS powermeters don't work well with overunity circuits, because they're calibrated to harmonic frequency in grid. And they also don't measure well too low voltages/currents outside the range of common grid circuits.

It's great you managed to eliminate magnets from your arrangement, as I always considered its usage a bit inconvenient and illogical with respect to your construction. If the overunity effect emerges inside the air coreless coil, then no magnet should be actually necessary.

Albert Einstein: “Make things as simple as possible, but not simpler.”

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #114 on: April 22, 2017, 06:08:16 PM »
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Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #115 on: April 22, 2017, 06:38:15 PM »
Hi magnetman, I think you don't need any scope and I even think, that the usage of scope in overunity measurements is misleading, because its interpretation depends on power factor and many other things, which are difficult to follow. Once someone tells me, that he observed overunity with scope, then I'm getting suspicious automatically.

So if you measure the input/output current and voltage with reliable multimeter, then it's completely OK - but you should measure the DC current only, because the multimeters exhibit artifacts during measuring inharmonic signals. It requires to place large electrolytic capacitor in parallel to you multimeter for to measure the stable, sufficiently averaged signal. If you measure the AC signal, your should rectify with diode bridge first. If your overunity effect is robust, it should tolerate the voltage drop at diodes. Even the high quality RMS powermeters don't work well with overunity circuits, because they're calibrated to harmonic frequency in grid. And they also don't measure well too low voltages/currents outside the range of common grid circuits.

It's great you managed to eliminate magnets from your arrangement, as I always considered its usage a bit inconvenient and illogical with respect to your construction. If the overunity effect emerges inside the air coreless coil, then no magnet should be actually necessary.

Albert Einstein: “Make things as simple as possible, but not simpler.”
I have been very careful and all my measurements have been DC voltage and current.  No AC.

Offline Zephir

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #116 on: April 22, 2017, 08:41:24 PM »
OK, so why not to attempt for creation of fully autonomous self-looped selfrunner with using of cheap inverters like these ones? They come in various sizes: from simple circuit modules over adapters to boxed devices. If you're able to power 60 watts with few watts from USB adapter, what prohibits you to include it into circuit and to power this adapter through inverter too? Your patient wife or powermeter can be still cheated with character of input signal, but the inverter cannot..;-)

And why not to finally replace the USB adapter with output of transformer, which you would power with your circuit instead of LEDs? You would avoid the redundant circuits, which just waste an energy.  Once you demonstrate self-looped device freely running at the table without any battery in the circuit, I can assure that you'll become replicated immediately.


Offline SkyWatcher123

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #117 on: April 22, 2017, 10:13:17 PM »
Hi all, i can tell you this, i will be replicating the main principles of the magnet man circuit shown here.
I will be using a somewhat different main oscillator, though i think the good action happens after that.
So while i'm waiting for the 12 volt led bulbs to arrive, i tried the SCR with a 12 volt incandescent yard bulb, it's a 4 watt bulb.
I think this green neon from the shack, is not functioning the same as magnetmans b7a neon.
With the bulb load, it does allow the neon to light up and the capacitor rises to well over 200 volts if it's on long enough, however, it still is not triggering the SCR to turn on.
So i shorted the anode to the gate with a screw driver and then yes, it turned on and poof, there goes my bulb.
So, i am curious now, if i do get this SCR to function properly.
Is it because magnetman has so many led bulbs in parallel, that the 70 or more volts dumped into them from the capacitor at a certain frequency, is enough load to prevent that high voltage from popping any of the led bulbs.
I have no doubt, with proper parts, i can get the SCR to fire, i'm just concerned with popping new led bulbs.
Any insight is appreciated.
peace love light

Offline gyulasun

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #118 on: April 22, 2017, 10:14:42 PM »
I already suggested looping to magnetman about 3 weeks ago:

http://overunity.com/17200/3-7-volt-battery-powers-56-watts/msg502788/#msg502788

Gyula 


Offline magnetman12003

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Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #119 on: April 23, 2017, 01:31:36 AM »
I already suggested looping to magnetman about 3 weeks ago:

http://overunity.com/17200/3-7-volt-battery-powers-56-watts/msg502788/#msg502788

Gyula

During the 3 years building up to what is now presently working I destroyed many transistors, burned up many neons and smoked a new watt meter.  So I don't want to put in jeopardy the working setup by doing more experiments and ruin it. Its been working real well for me now running cold with no heating problems or glowing neons.  I trust those building what I have illustrated will run further tests and see if they can take it further than I.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: 3.7 VOLT BATTERY POWERS 56 WATTS
« Reply #119 on: April 23, 2017, 01:31:36 AM »

 

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