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Author Topic: Hemp battery  (Read 1105 times)

Offline dieter

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Hemp battery
« on: March 06, 2017, 09:10:38 PM »
Just tried to find a thread by looking into the battery section, surprisingly none found.


I would really like to try that, it seems doable.
Seemingly hemp is like ten times better than Lithium-Ion, and several times even than Graphene.


Supercaps are they, as they load quicker than anything else.


Google it up or something.


Has anybody tried that, beside Murray, who refers to "it's all over the web" when it comes to Howto, which is slightly exaggerated.


Anyway, rexresearch has a file on it, too.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Hemp battery
« on: March 06, 2017, 09:10:38 PM »

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2017, 03:41:27 PM »
The plant fibers are electrically conductive
They are heat treated in a process similar to making
"char-cloth"
The resulting carbon lattice is used as both electrodes
of a battery using your choice of electrolyte.


The exponential higher surface area, when compared to
metal electrodes of the same size, gives these batteries
a longer run time, shorter charge time, and their ability
to absorb combines to create energy densities (Ahr/g)
better than any other battery we have today.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2017, 03:55:42 PM »
The exact process:


Bast fibers come from the inner layer of bark
Just before you get to the woody pulp material.
These fibers are sealed and heated for 24 hrs
Held at a temp at or just above 350 degrees.


This can be as simple as placing them in an altoids
can in a bed of coals. (Actually any plant fibers can
be processed in this manner to create carbaceous cloth)


Electrodes are usually made in a more controlled way, like
in an oven, to control variables. But the process is quite simple.

Offline ramset

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2017, 04:20:40 PM »
Sm0ky
Quote
Bast fibers come from the inner layer of bark    ---->   @Edit corrected best to Bast as Smoky writes below
Just before you get to the woody pulp material.
end quote

is there a species of hemp which has no legal issues attached to it ?

*although we could probably get the discarded waste from Growers who
are mostly harvesting for "medicine" [THC].

would seem a simple process to experiment with ,just wish to avoid legal issues here in USA


Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2017, 04:55:38 PM »
"Bast" not best
Bast is the type of plant fiber
It's the inner most bark fibers




"Hemp" is different from the weed people get high from.
As such it has a whole other set of legal issues.
The US recently started allowing production again
We used to be the worlds largest hemp producer
The army made ropes with the stuff. There are several
Out of use hemp farms across the US, where the plant still
grows wildly.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2017, 04:55:38 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline ramset

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2017, 02:50:43 AM »
a few RMS links on Hemp compared to lithium
and the rexresearch link dieter mentioned

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=or6rO5_bze0

http://weedrecommend.com/2175/watch-is-hemp-battery-better-than-lithium-this-man-thinks-so


http://rexresearch.com/mitlin/mitlin.htm

and just one comment ,it would seem Hemp does not hold the exclusive rights to this "best For" claim
other less controversial plants may work too..

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2017, 04:30:15 AM »
The technology does not technically exist.
And as such allow us to be the pioneers into
a new form of electrically conductive materials
To be used in every manner possibly imaginable.


I don't mean to steer the topic off thread so first
Allow me to state that the following deposit of knowledge
Into human hands applies also to "hemp batteries/supercacitors"


This knowledge, while it comes from me, is not mine
but existed in the everywhen during a visit and such things
that have reside in this brain of mine only emerge when relevant.
..... which it appears it just has become.


So (you asked for it!)
https://youtu.be/GsgrygfnCsg


And after watching that , my next post will be the technical stuff.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2017, 04:30:15 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2017, 05:02:01 AM »
Various fibers of organic origin have heavy carbon content.
The exact form and concentration of carbons vary with fiber type.
The bast fibers of many plants are electrically conductive.
This applies to any trees that could be classified as 'electroactive'.
As well as several shrubberies, grasses, flowering plants, vines.
And certain fungi


As well as several fibrous insect and animal deposits


The degree of carbonation of the substrate varies with fiber structure
and temperature, pressure and time it takes for the carbonation/decarbonation
process to complete.


"Charcloth", as shown in the video above, was formed at extreme temperatures
above average pressure and for a short time.


The conditions to create an organic conductor are such that
The material itself is under pressure, or pressed, and heated slowly and held constant
For discrete times to allow a full carbonation/ decarbonation cycle.


Within a range of optimal performance, the length of "cooking time" will affect
the specific attributes of conductivity, absorbtivity, surface area, and fragility.
As well as the (yet undiscovered) attribute of reverse conductivity.


As these organic conductors can be made from virtually anything, this may cause
an upset in the precious metals markets and force electronics companies to
Take a long hard look at their corporate profiles.


300 degrees for 24 hours is the best recipe the hemp experimenters have come up with.
As it pertains to hemp, this is not the absolute ideal. Increased pre-pressing, and a slight
decrease in temperature (maybe 10-12 degrees), and a shorter time, by almost half.
13-14 hrs (experimentally) could be a starting point.


Each fiber type will have its own desirable range of temps/times like baking a cake.
To make ideal conductors, resistive conductors, inductive conductors,semi-conductors,
and multi-directional conductors(?). All from organic materials.
which will lead to a breakthrough in genetic engineering by combining a yeast with
some type of plant life to make a fast growing fiber we can "cook" into organic components
Devices, computers , "living machines", and other things that are so scary I'm not going to tell
you guys about.


These groundbreaking steps taken here today will launch a new field of science and technology
That merges biology into electronics.
Cyberorganics.


I have managed to retain a good deal of the information, and can assist in development of the science
Humans have not had the capacity to understand how this all works until very recently.
Now that our science and technology is prepared for the transition, it makes this a perfect time to
Be talking about this particular subject.




Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2017, 06:35:08 AM »
Organic conductors are extremely low-cost, versatile,
And can take on any shape or size.


Different plant fibers and 'recipes' will unlock a whole
World of potential applications.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2017, 07:35:51 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline dieter

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2017, 01:13:24 AM »
Thanks for your contributions, Smoky.


Indeed Coal is electricly conductive, well we knrw that since thw carbon-zinc battery etc. However, conductivity is usually rather low, too low for a capacitor, no match or substitute for metals, but... here it comes... Nanotubes, and Graphene-similar structures are found in hemp, whoch explains the extraordinary strength of the hemp rope (America wouldn'd be discovered if it wasn't for columbus' hemp sails and ropes, btw., any other organic cloth will rott away in 2 weeks on sea)


So, yes, we can carbonize any plant material, but they are not all very good conductors, where the nanotube-like structure of hemp really tends to go towards room temperature superconductivity, just like real nanotubes, but much cheaper to manufacture.


Bill Murray-Smith os the kind of dube who mods his inkjet printer to print ultrathin layers of his selfmade graphene, just to make a kitchen-diy mega farad capacitor, a fteakin million Farad, at much higher voltages than todays supercaps... just smashing, as our britisch friends say.


He also tested Bamboo, which was not so effective, and seaweed, which was very good. You have to watch his stuff, esp. in this context.


Tinman also picked up Bills Graphene Cap methods and I would be surprised, if he isn't already testing hemp.


Speaking of which, you should be able to buy in the home improvement store, plumbers hemp, very cheap and already seperated from the useless parts.
The use it to tighten wazer pipes at thw screwed sections, hemp deposits chalk, which is then making it 100% watertight. The company Dupont has a teflon tape as a substitute, costy and cannot be used multiple times... they also tried to market their nylon patent by criminalizing any hemp fibre, well, that's an other story.


So, ok, hemp in carbonized in the hydrothermal carbonization process, at 180 to 200 deg celsius for 24h. Maybe possible in a stream pressure pot. Bill mentions to add a bit of acid to help the xarbonization, tho that must be washed out afterwards.


Then was mentioned they soaked the fibre in something, maybe sodium whatever thingy, do you know anything about that,Smokey?


I'm also interested in the inkjet printer mod, what would you use as the liquid substance in the ink? Glycerine, Water... anything else?


BTW. there is industrial hemp, especially cultivated to have low amount of psychoactive delta-9-THC, this is legal in any country, usually up to eg. 0.99% THC at max, tho a Farmer requires special permission to grow it. Anyhow, get plumbers hemp, hemp rope or hemp cord, it's precisely the fibre required.

Offline dieter

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2017, 01:19:38 AM »
BTW sorry about the typos.


Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2017, 05:40:05 AM »
@dieter


Maybe cellulose?
Not sure, I know historically organic electronics have been
heavily chemically processed. Which to me seems to defeat
the purpose. I don't believe there is anything unique about
hemp, in particular, except that it is on the list of life forms
that produce these certain type of fibers.
The politics of hemp and its' medical cousin, are heavily
promoting this for their own goals.


It's a modest compromise, because they help expose the truth
about organic electronics.
Prepared spinach leaf proteins have magnetic properties
Hard fibers can be prepared with capacitive properties
Flax bast is electrically similar to hemp
Jute, Ramie, or any dicotyledon.

Offline dieter

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2017, 07:49:35 AM »
Organic Chemistry is a synonym for Carbon chemistry, where, unlike most other elements, carbon can build extremly complex molecules, even up to nanotubes. Therefor molecular properties of plants differ greatly. Besides hemp being the cure for cancer, I think there is indeed something special to it. Molecular structure is tubeoid, resulting in very special electrical features, although there are certainly more plants like that, eg. the hairs of certain palmtree stems, that are as tough as hemp. (cocos?)


That being said, only after carbonization any of these cap / battery features become available.


Furthermore, the right amount of grinding is required. You want it fine, but the nanotubes still intact.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline sm0ky2

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Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2017, 06:06:24 PM »
Organic Chemistry is a synonym for Carbon chemistry, where, unlike most other elements, carbon can build extremly complex molecules, even up to nanotubes. Therefor molecular properties of plants differ greatly. Besides hemp being the cure for cancer, I think there is indeed something special to it. Molecular structure is tubeoid, resulting in very special electrical features, although there are certainly more plants like that, eg. the hairs of certain palmtree stems, that are as tough as hemp. (cocos?)


That being said, only after carbonization any of these cap / battery features become available.


Furthermore, the right amount of grinding is required. You want it fine, but the nanotubes still intact.


This is correct, processing of the fibers must be adequate, without damaging the fiber structures.
Side dependent variables are present for each fiber type.
Microstructure does play an important role, and various fibers have different properties.
While hemp or flax might make great interfaces for i.e. Electrodes, connectors, plugs
Certain algae might be more suitable for its capacitance, or as a storage medium.
I think each type of fiber will play an important role in understanding our full potential.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Hemp battery
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2017, 06:06:24 PM »

 

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