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Author Topic: An interesting experiment in magnetism  (Read 2755 times)

Offline vineet_kiran

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An interesting experiment in magnetism
« on: December 24, 2016, 10:25:04 AM »

Video at :


https://youtu.be/f1d65kWr13s


In the video you can observe that a small disc magnet released from the edge of a ramp (non-magnetic plate) moves from the region of lower  potential to higher potential, gaining kinetic energy.  Due to kinetic energy it moves over total length of the fixed magnet but does not again make up the ramp.

Question is,  if strong neo magnets are used will the moving magnet make up the ramp again completing the loop?  (I have used ferrite disc magnets)


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Floor

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2016, 04:27:30 PM »
The "stick spot" will still be there if you use
stronger magnets. 

The force and speed of the moving magnet may increase,
but also the strength of the stick spot will increase.

               regards
                       floor


Offline MagnaProp

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2016, 02:08:04 AM »
Nice experiment. I like how it moves farther along the magnets counter clockwise than it does clockwise.

I agree with Floor. I would try making the magnet that moves heavier by adding something non-magnetic to it like epoxy putty.

Offline vineet_kiran

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2016, 12:01:49 PM »
Nice experiment. I like how it moves farther along the magnets counter clockwise than it does clockwise.

I agree with Floor. I would try making the magnet that moves heavier by adding something non-magnetic to it like epoxy putty.


Wish you good luck.  This experiment can be done using a ring magnet also.  I have posted a video.  Please have a look.


https://youtu.be/Dquw4pZCu9U


Is it possible to eliminate sticky point by using a combination of magnetic (steel) and non-magnetic plates?  If a small steel plate is provided at the beginning of the ramp, it may absorb the flux at that area and eliminate the sticky point.






Offline sm0ky2

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2016, 02:24:14 PM »
The operation of the force vectors is similar to that of the 'smot'
What is interesting with these types of magnetic systems is:


The force differential changes with the rotation of the smaller magnet.
This is of course a function of their relative diameters, but often one will find
that over the course of repeated experiments, the "sticky spot" may move!
As the smaller magnet does not often commit to an equal number of turns
per revolution, it is facing a slightly different direction each time it encounters
a magnetic boundary.


Should one accidentally find a perfectly proportioned pair of circles
You will experience the baseline effects that John Searl exploited in his devices.



Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2016, 02:24:14 PM »
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Offline MagnaProp

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2016, 07:59:58 PM »
Wish you good luck.  This experiment can be done using a ring magnet also...
Thanks for the video. Are the magnets magnetized axially as in the attached image?

The one benefit with neos that you might get is that the sticky spot will be more predictable and not move or may not be there at all in your set up since the field is more uniform and less prone to change than ferrite is. If your set up is as in the attached image, I don't why there would be any sticky spot at all since the pull on the moving magnet looks like it should be equal on both sides.

Unfortunately from my magnet experiments, I have seen that the sticky spot is what drives any movement. Remove the sticky spot and you remove any movement in the system. So we need the sticky spot there for most of the time and have it disappear for a brief time. That's when we start adding levers and other contraptions to the device which makes it complicated fast.

Offline vineet_kiran

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2016, 01:40:44 AM »
It is actually not the sticky spot but the magnet has to move from higher to lower potential to complete the loop.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2016, 01:40:44 AM »
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Offline MagnaProp

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2016, 03:05:26 AM »
It is actually not the sticky spot but the magnet has to move from higher to lower potential to complete the loop.
Good explanation. So the green segment is all the potential energy you provided. The trip around the magnet is just friction loss. Neo's would make that same distance stronger potential but the friction loss might be greater as well as the smaller magnet is held tighter against the larger magnet.

If the smaller magnet wasn't allowed to physically touch the larger magnet, you would remove a lot of friction loss so it could go around a few more times. It still won't be able to go back up to the potential spot on it's own without some kind of help.

Maybe add some coils for the moving magnet to pass by so that we can activate a motor long enough to move back up to the potential spot. We got work to do.

Offline sm0ky2

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2016, 05:42:32 AM »
I toyed with this phenomena about 10-12 yrs ago
Various sizes ring magnets (dipole) and circle (disk) magnets
As well as magnetron rings (quadrupole)


In some configurations, the magnet may travel for
more than one complete circle. This is not an indication of 'ou'.
But rather that the force potential extends
beyond the boundary of your experiment.


It has been presumed that there is a "uniform" field around
around the centerline.
This is not necessarily the case, and in fact is often not.
There is always an axis of magnetization, perpendicular to
the dielectric plane.
This will represent itself as an asymmetric field domain.
The interacting magnets will choose 'preferred' spots to stop in.
Where field domains have the strongest attracting force.


When I mentioned above that this 'sticky spot' may move-
     what this means is the rotating magnets do not match-up
     in the same way each time around the loop.
The field axises may line up completely different after 360-degrees
of rotation, such that the greatest attracting field potential is now in a
different location.


It is not the magnets themselves changing,
   just the way they line up.


If the diameters of the magnets are perfect multiplesisors of one another
   This may not occur ( at least in the case of symmetrical axises)


How to determine where the axial plane of magnetization is?
Use a compass or similar sensitive magnetized needle or instrument
And follow the dielectric plane
When you locate an axis you can follow it perpendicularly back to its'
associated pole. If the axises are not symmetrical, the axis of the
opposite pole will be in a different location.


Hope this helps.
(p.s- John Searl's method of using this was to force the smaller magnet
        to never line up with the axises of the larger field. Thus no 'sticky spot')




Offline vineet_kiran

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2016, 07:27:36 AM »

@sm0ky2

Thanks for the information.   I feel that presence of a magnetic material such as a steel plate near a magnet greatly changes the alignment or orientation of the flux.

https://youtu.be/0mKkyuk3ekM


Just have a look at the above video.  You can see a steel plate placed on the ring magnet repels the small magnet when it is in contact with the ring magnet but attracts when it is not in contact with the ring magnet.

I think if we do some 'jugglery' with such a system, we can get OU.




Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2016, 07:27:36 AM »
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Offline Cherryman

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Re: An interesting experiment in magnetism
« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2016, 09:22:27 AM »
@sm0ky2

Thanks for the information.   I feel that presence of a magnetic material such as a steel plate near a magnet greatly changes the alignment or orientation of the flux.

https://youtu.be/0mKkyuk3ekM


Just have a look at the above video.  You can see a steel plate placed on the ring magnet repels the small magnet when it is in contact with the ring magnet but attracts when it is not in contact with the ring magnet.

I think if we do some 'jugglery' with such a system, we can get OU.


Your little experiment reminded me of the NASA slingshot manoeuvre.


Approaching with a certain speed a gravitational body ( in this case the magnet ) , loop about half around it and exiting in another angle with more speed. 


You could try it without the magnet s actually touching to try replicating that.

 

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