Cookies-law

Cookies help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
http://www.overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please leave this website now. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

Poplamp

poplamp

CCTool

CCTool

LEDTVforSale

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

OverUnity Book

overunity principles book

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Statistics

  • *Total Members: 81922
  • *Latest: bobdring

  • *Total Posts: 490783
  • *Total Topics: 14441
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 3
  • *Guests: 223
  • *Total: 226

Facebook

Author Topic: capacitor step down  (Read 1979 times)

Offline webby1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2988
capacitor step down
« on: November 16, 2016, 06:28:17 PM »
This is a half baked thought  :)

If I take 50 capacitors and hook them in series and charge the string to 1000V and then reconnect them in parallel I can step down the voltage and up the amperage.

What if all the capacitors were within 1 body,, so 100 plates with a wire for each plate.

I take the first and last plate and charge them to 1000V with all the other plates not connected,, then if I were to connect every other plate in parallel would that do the same thing?

Now what if I have the 100 plates hooked up but I have another 2 plates and they are not "within" the stack of 100,, If I charge those 2 plates up to 1000V and then move the dielectric from between them to between the 100 plates could that do the same thing?

If it COULD work,, then if I were using a liquid dielectric could I then simply keep pumping the liquid from the 2 plates through the 100 plates and have a constant step down?

Could this be a way of making a transformer for DC?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

capacitor step down
« on: November 16, 2016, 06:28:17 PM »

Offline Zeitmaschine

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1215
Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2016, 05:20:15 PM »
Simply use a capacitor with movable plates so you can adjust the clearance between the plates. The more clearance the lower the capacitance the higher the voltage of the previously charged capacitor, and vice versa. So you have a continuously variable DC voltage transformation.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline webby1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2988
Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2016, 06:13:08 PM »
I was thinking along the lines of a continuous exchange.

Moving the plates would mean a charge and then discharge, or a pulse cycle using the same plates that you charge to then provide the discharge.

I was thinking more in line with like the "Ionic Breeze" air purifier with fan action or the gutter high voltage device,, the one that uses the falling rain water to transfer charge.

I was also pondering if there could be a recirculating flow of the liquid medium similar to convection currents in water, to maybe act as the "pump" mechanism or at least reduce the cost of pumping.

It is just something I have been thinking about while I play with other stuff, including home made capacitors.

Not sure if it would have any real use anyway.

Offline webby1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2988
Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2016, 02:48:48 PM »
I was just thinking about "a" difference between a battery and a capacitor.

A capacitor will accept an input and raise its voltage to some value and then when you discharge that cap it will drop the value down to zero.

A battery has plates and can act like a capacitor in that it will also accept an input and momentarily raise its potential as seen by the terminals BUT when this "capacitance" has been discharged the battery will then continue to discharge at the battery voltage.

IE:  If I use a cap to take the input of a coil and PM as the PM is moving into the coil and it hits lets say 20V and then I reverse the polarity of the cap to coil so that it then repels the magnet away from the coil the cap will provide that initial 20V and drop to 0V,,, but if I used a battery that is 10V then if it takes that initial 20V charge and creates a surface charge up to 20V and then I reverse its polarity to the coil so that it repels the PM it will give up that 20V initially and then continue at 10V providing for a longer positive force of repulsion against the PM.


Offline lancaIV

  • elite_member
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2108

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2016, 05:20:16 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline webby1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2988
Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2016, 05:35:42 PM »
Thermo-couples are interesting,,

After I was thinking about this,, and having experience with this surface charge thing,, I was also wondering about some devices that seem to maybe work sometimes but require the use of a battery.

What if these systems hit the sweet spot on the surface charge,, each battery being a little different would make it a one in who knows how many to get the conditions just right.

If this could be the situation then if a system was created that would be able to provide this exact interaction to an engineered stable condition things might work.

Offline shylo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 459
Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2016, 12:20:10 AM »
I just use caps , batteries tend to go dead.
artv

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2016, 12:20:10 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline webby1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2988
Re: capacitor step down
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2016, 10:43:05 PM »
I wonder if you can use a cap to provide a low resistance one way and a high resistance the other.

I was also wondering about the mechanics of the step down cap,, if it could work.

The dielectric would be charged up relative to the plate separation,, so the high voltage plates could be 10mm apart and the low voltage plates could be 1mm apart,, now pump the dielectric around.

Would the charge carrier get dragged along for the ride with the dielectric?  That does not sound right because you would need to move a positive and negative down,, lets just say,, and that sounds wrong.

Would that mean then that the charge carriers would stay on the plates,, if so then how many can it hold?

 

Share this topic to your favourite Social and Bookmark site

Please SHARE this topic at: