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Author Topic: Bulgarian MEG Replication  (Read 3602 times)

Offline steadyfield

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Bulgarian MEG Replication
« on: November 02, 2016, 02:16:09 PM »
Bulgarian MEG Replication

Hi everyone,
I'm steadyfield (from China). Recently I'm experimenting with the Bulgarian MEG device. (http://overunity.com/4300/a-truly-overunity-transformer-meg/#.WBni0FWUe2s)

A full bridge (H-Bridge) consists of 4 MOSFETs is used to drive the input coils. The PWM is generated by a dspic30f4011 MCU. The frequency and dutycycle of the PWM are adjustable on the MCU.

The 2 input coils are 40T+40T, the fluxes of the coils are aiding. The output coil is 80T. The loads are two 50 Ohms resistors connected in series. The permanent magnet is in the middle. I tried various magnets (ferrite, neodymium, AlNiCo), and no significant difference of performance was found.

At the switching frequency of Approx. 20KHz and 52.5% dutycycle, the COP is only 0.6 . When loaded, the input current DOES increase. When the magnet is removed, the output is gone. I wonder what is wrong with the replication.

The video will be uploaded soon.

Edit: The Video is uploaded here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iz4POclJ8ws
« Last Edit: November 03, 2016, 01:59:08 AM by steadyfield »

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Bulgarian MEG Replication
« on: November 02, 2016, 02:16:09 PM »

Offline steadyfield

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2016, 02:17:03 PM »
More Images

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Offline steadyfield

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2016, 02:17:35 PM »
Output Waveform.

Offline gyulasun

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2016, 12:50:40 AM »
Hi steadyfield,

Nice setup and instruments! It is good there is no output when you remove the magnet.
I wonder however on the need to change the direction of current in the input coils? from input core saturation point of view
it does not matter.
You change current to reset the B-H curve of the input core?

I ask this because first a half wave rectified current was used by the inventor at the input and he tuned the output coil with
a correct value capacitor to resonate it (so to say to regain the "missing" other half wave), and he still claimed to receive COP >1. 
Of course a half wave rectifier produces DC bias in the core, this need to be considered.
So try to tune the output coil to the input frequency first, (20 kHz) with a parallel capacitor, then try to tune it to 40 kHz and see
how the output power changes. 

One more thing: try to attach a single Neo magnet to the side of the input core to influence its saturation level and see how
the output power changes. Perhaps a second magnet on the opposite side of the core, facing the first 'tuning' magnet via
the core could also influence the saturation even more, hence the operation. 

Gyula

Bulgarian MEG Replication

Hi everyone,
I'm steadyfield (from China). Recently I'm experimenting with the Bulgarian MEG device. (http://overunity.com/4300/a-truly-overunity-transformer-meg/#.WBni0FWUe2s)

A full bridge (H-Bridge) consists of 4 MOSFETs is used to drive the input coils. The PWM is generated by a dspic30f4011 MCU. The frequency and dutycycle of the PWM are adjustable on the MCU.

The 2 input coils are 40T+40T, the fluxes of the coils are aiding. The output coil is 80T. The loads are two 50 Ohms resistors connected in series. The permanent magnet is in the middle. I tried various magnets (ferrite, neodymium, AlNiCo), and no significant difference of performance was found.

At the switching frequency of Approx. 20KHz and 52.5% dutycycle, the COP is only 0.6 . When loaded, the input current DOES increase. When the magnet is removed, the output is gone. I wonder what is wrong with the replication.

The video will be uploaded soon.


Offline gotoluc

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2016, 02:50:54 PM »
Question,


did you make this video which is on your youtube account: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv53HgiWkmM


Thanks


Luc

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2016, 02:50:54 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline steadyfield

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2016, 01:13:28 AM »
Question,


did you make this video which is on your youtube account: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv53HgiWkmM


Thanks


Luc

Hi Luc,
    That shaded pole motors video was NOT made by me. And I just repost it. It was made by a Chinese named "青云" ("Cloud"). He has also made some progress in Donald Smith Device. I believe that the self running shaded pole motors video is a fake.

Steadyfield

Offline steadyfield

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2016, 01:24:56 AM »
Hi steadyfield,

Nice setup and instruments! It is good there is no output when you remove the magnet.
I wonder however on the need to change the direction of current in the input coils? from input core saturation point of view
it does not matter.
You change current to reset the B-H curve of the input core?

I ask this because first a half wave rectified current was used by the inventor at the input and he tuned the output coil with
a correct value capacitor to resonate it (so to say to regain the "missing" other half wave), and he still claimed to receive COP >1. 
Of course a half wave rectifier produces DC bias in the core, this need to be considered.
So try to tune the output coil to the input frequency first, (20 kHz) with a parallel capacitor, then try to tune it to 40 kHz and see
how the output power changes. 

One more thing: try to attach a single Neo magnet to the side of the input core to influence its saturation level and see how
the output power changes. Perhaps a second magnet on the opposite side of the core, facing the first 'tuning' magnet via
the core could also influence the saturation even more, hence the operation. 

Gyula

Hi gyulasun,

Thanks for your reply.

I tried changing the direction of the current just by tunning the dutycycle to [50%-2.5%=47.5%] and the effect was the same with 52.5% dutycycle.

When adding one more magnet placed in parallel with the neo magnet (N-N, S-S), the output does increase. However the input current does also increase. When placed the new magnet in (N-S, S-N) with the neo magnet, the output decrease, and the input current also decrease. So I can see a strong coupling from the output to the input.

I tried placing a capacitor in parallel with the load. The output Vrms increased and looked more like a sine wave, however the input current increased. I tried varying the frequency and cannot find a "resonant peak". I didn't try placing the capacitor in parallel with the input coil as I was using a full bridge topology with no inductor connected in the DC Bus.

Steadyfield

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2016, 01:24:56 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline gotoluc

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2016, 01:42:21 AM »
Hi Luc,
    That shaded pole motors video was NOT made by me. And I just repost it. It was made by a Chinese named "青云" ("Cloud"). He has also made some progress in Donald Smith Device. I believe that the self running shaded pole motors video is a fake.

Steadyfield


Thanks Steadyfield for the clarification.
I also believe it is faked and would recommend you not hosting these kind of videos on your youtube account if you want your own research work taken seriously. Support only what you have tested yourself to work.


Thanks for sharing your real experiments and looking forward to more.


Luc

Offline steadyfield

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2016, 06:06:59 AM »

Thanks Steadyfield for the clarification.
I also believe it is faked and would recommend you not hosting these kind of videos on your youtube account if you want your own research work taken seriously. Support only what you have tested yourself to work.


Thanks for sharing your real experiments and looking forward to more.


Luc


Luc,

Thanks for your suggestion. I have removed that video.

Steadyfield

Offline gyulasun

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2016, 03:25:57 PM »
Hi steadyfield,

I think the duty cycle should be changed in a much wider range, say from 5% to 50% at least. If you cannot do this
with your present PWM generator, then just build a simple 555 timer circuit like shown here
http://overunity.com/8411/steorn-demo-live-stream-in-dublin-december-15th-10-am/msg243175/#msg243175 
The frequency and the duty cycle can be varied independently from each other.
 
I think somehow you would need to make sure (as a first step) that the input core should go into saturation.
To do this, remove the permanent magnet(s) from your full setup and insert a 1 Ohm (maybe 0.1 Ohm) noninductive resistor
in series with the two input coils to monitor input current by your scope. Here is a good video on this where
he changes duty cycle and first the input current of the coil increases linearly as it should, then there comes a break
and current starts increasing non-linearly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDt_Im1TtEE
He speaks Greek language, on his blog there is the schematic for his measuring setup:  http://tinyurl.com/jmrxrxs       

The goal would be to find a low duty cycle (the lower the better) setting with a given (variable) supply voltage amplitude and
input current value where the core goes well into the saturated area.
And when this is more or less achieved, and still there is no output power across the load of course, you could insert
a permanent magnet. I believe your present magnet is very, very strong. I know you tried ceramic and AlNiCo ones too
but now I suggest to monitor the input current when you insert a magnet to see how it influences input core saturation.
I think there would be a certain (unavoidable) interaction which could be minimized by using the lowest duty cycle possible
for a good input core saturation with a given input voltage level.

Do you have an air gap under or at the output coil core? And I assume your input cores are two C shapes facing each other,
without air gap, right? Or you use an E core there?

On tuning the output coil with a capacitor: probably the 100 Ohm load attenuates the LC circuit too much to see the usual voltage peak
at resonance. First try to use some kOhm load (or even no load) to easily find the resonant frequency either with changing capacitors
and / or sweeping the input frequency.
No need to place a capacitor in parallel with the input coil.

I suggest reading member Getca posts in his findings, he reported COP>1 result.
http://overunity.com/4300/a-truly-overunity-transformer-meg/msg134162/#msg134162 

I attached a video, taken from youtube long time ago, that nicely show how permanent magnets can passively cause local core saturation
to create a virtual "air gap" in the core. Unfortunately I cannot remember who uploaded it to give credit to him.

In your video ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iz4POclJ8ws ) there is still output power when your permanent magnet is horizontally attached
to the side of the lower ferrite bar  and power disappears only when you completely remove that magnet.  This may indicate it is a
very strong magnet for the job? Or too small air gap at the output coil side in the core?  There exists a strong magnetic coupling between
the input core and the output core in your setup
As another test, you may wish to swap the places of the permanet magnet and the input core as per the animated gif file shows in Getca post.

Regards,
Gyula

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2016, 03:25:57 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline steadyfield

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2016, 03:47:50 AM »
Hi steadyfield,

I think the duty cycle should be changed in a much wider range, say from 5% to 50% at least. If you cannot do this
with your present PWM generator, then just build a simple 555 timer circuit like shown here
http://overunity.com/8411/steorn-demo-live-stream-in-dublin-december-15th-10-am/msg243175/#msg243175 
The frequency and the duty cycle can be varied independently from each other.
 
I think somehow you would need to make sure (as a first step) that the input core should go into saturation.
To do this, remove the permanent magnet(s) from your full setup and insert a 1 Ohm (maybe 0.1 Ohm) noninductive resistor
in series with the two input coils to monitor input current by your scope. Here is a good video on this where
he changes duty cycle and first the input current of the coil increases linearly as it should, then there comes a break
and current starts increasing non-linearly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDt_Im1TtEE
He speaks Greek language, on his blog there is the schematic for his measuring setup:  http://tinyurl.com/jmrxrxs       

The goal would be to find a low duty cycle (the lower the better) setting with a given (variable) supply voltage amplitude and
input current value where the core goes well into the saturated area.
And when this is more or less achieved, and still there is no output power across the load of course, you could insert
a permanent magnet. I believe your present magnet is very, very strong. I know you tried ceramic and AlNiCo ones too
but now I suggest to monitor the input current when you insert a magnet to see how it influences input core saturation.
I think there would be a certain (unavoidable) interaction which could be minimized by using the lowest duty cycle possible
for a good input core saturation with a given input voltage level.

Do you have an air gap under or at the output coil core? And I assume your input cores are two C shapes facing each other,
without air gap, right? Or you use an E core there?

On tuning the output coil with a capacitor: probably the 100 Ohm load attenuates the LC circuit too much to see the usual voltage peak
at resonance. First try to use some kOhm load (or even no load) to easily find the resonant frequency either with changing capacitors
and / or sweeping the input frequency.
No need to place a capacitor in parallel with the input coil.

I suggest reading member Getca posts in his findings, he reported COP>1 result.
http://overunity.com/4300/a-truly-overunity-transformer-meg/msg134162/#msg134162 

I attached a video, taken from youtube long time ago, that nicely show how permanent magnets can passively cause local core saturation
to create a virtual "air gap" in the core. Unfortunately I cannot remember who uploaded it to give credit to him.

In your video ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iz4POclJ8ws ) there is still output power when your permanent magnet is horizontally attached
to the side of the lower ferrite bar  and power disappears only when you completely remove that magnet.  This may indicate it is a
very strong magnet for the job? Or too small air gap at the output coil side in the core?  There exists a strong magnetic coupling between
the input core and the output core in your setup
As another test, you may wish to swap the places of the permanet magnet and the input core as per the animated gif file shows in Getca post.

Regards,
Gyula

Hi, Gyula

Firstly I would clarify my setup a little bit. The cores of the input coils are two "C" ferrite core.  I'm not using a single-ended driver. The H-Bridge is used to drive the input coils. The voltage applied to the input coils is a bipolar square wave [-Vdc,+Vdc]. When the dutycycle is 50%, the net volt-second applied to the input coils is zero and the input current is less than 10mA (The bench power supply displays 0.00A). And there is no output. 

When the input square wave breaks symmetry (either greater or less than 50%), the input current rises.  The more the dutycycle deviate from 50%, the more the input current. When the dutycycle starts to deviate from 50%, the input current increases and the output also increases. When reached a dutycycle of 52.5% (or 47.5%), the output amplitude is the highest. As the dutycycle continues to deviate, the output amplitude begins to fall while the input current continues to rise. So as for the current setup, the 52.5% or 47.5% might be the "sweet spot".

I have tried adding and varying the air gap of the output. The larger the air gap, the less the input and output. So the coupling is still here.

I will try attaching a current sensing resistor in series with the input coils to see if there is saturation, and I will also remove the loads in parallel with the capacitor to better find resonance. Do you think I should use a single-ended driver instead of a H-bridge?

Regards,
Steadyfield


Offline gyulasun

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2016, 11:50:53 AM »
...
I will try attaching a current sensing resistor in series with the input coils to see if there is saturation, and I will also remove the loads in parallel with the capacitor to better find resonance. Do you think I should use a single-ended driver instead of a H-bridge?
...

Hi Steadyfield,

Thanks for the further clarification on your setup. Sorry but I have not considered driving this MEG with a H-bridge.
I may be wrong but it looks like the H-bridge insures eventually the equivalent of a single ended drive
which feeds the coils with 2.5% duty cycle pulses when you change the 50% duty cycle a little.  Is this correct?
If yes, then no need to drive the coils with a single ended driver, unless you wish to check it too.

My understanding is (though I may be wrong) that your so called bipolar square wave with its near 50% duty cycle
is not an ideal waveform here because there is no current change during its 'flat' horizontal top and bottom portions.
And in case you disturb this waveform symmetry, it is the difference which lets the current flow and the 2.5% difference
seems optimal for your setup. I do not mean such drive is wrong, just different from the others.
IF we consider the inventor's half wave drive
(see here http://overunity.com/4300/a-truly-overunity-transformer-meg/msg134662/#msg134662 ), then it is sure the
peak current (to cause saturation) occurs when the half wave voltage is at its peaks value, so the "ON time" of the flux switch
is in the peak voltage range.
It is possible that with a single ended drive and with say 2-5% duty cycle range you would receive the same output you got so far.
Sorry that I have no hands on tests on the Bulgarian MEG, years ago I built the MEG setup by Thomas Bearden et al
but got only 87% efficiency. Of course I realised that the Bearden MEG setup shown in the patent is a mere pulsed transformer.

Gyula


Offline lancaIV

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Re: Bulgarian MEG Replication
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2016, 01:05:41 PM »
One of the last international entries,also listened as www.patentauction.com offer :


https://worldwide.espacenet.com/publicationDetails/biblio?CC=ES&NR=1143608Y&KC=Y&FT=D


Este generador no precisa de movimiento o rotación de sus elementos y no genera residuos contaminantes de forma directa.
~ static dynamo by Keiichiro Asaoka


pulsed DC or AC : anti-/matter sphere generator/transformer


and staying attended: http://www.energymev.org

 

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