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Author Topic: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit  (Read 3950 times)

Offline joellagace

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Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« on: July 09, 2016, 07:00:34 PM »
Hello all, I have been messing around with this method now for a a while with some success. I am not very good at math so most of this is all done with random parts and trial and error, Anyways what I have been experimenting with is a variety of induction coils and capacitors and antennas, Mostly stuff I salvaged from old ham radio or AM transmitter gear. With a variety of loops and antennas with the help of my o-scope I can bring these circuits into resonance and pull in enough voltage to drive an oscillator that I can rectify to DC and then measure with my volt meter up to 40 volts with 50ma of current all running from my table inside the house. So the whole idea of using a tuned L/C circuit to collect various energy from "the air" works, But the current is somewhat meh, Some are able to charge a small battery after a day or so. Not very practical.  The fun stuff from what I have been reading about is once you start shorting this tuned L/C circuit capacitor at the same rate as the input tuned frequency that the capacitor is charging at, The discharge spike gets amplified and collected with the help of some single turns low impedance pick up coils gathering these discharge spikes and then rectifying it to DC is where the extra current extraction kicks in. Kind of like a Tesla coil running in reverse I suppose. Anyhow the whole idea is that the shorting switching oscillator only needing a few volts of "Bait" induction power to start up, Once the shorting takes place, The extraction from the discharges ends up being more then the oscillator is needed to run, Gathering a quick excess of power, That could be fed back into a chain of super capacitor bank, Emulating a storage battery and with the help of maybe a power rectifier to feed to oscillator steady with just a couple of volts needed and the rest be feed into maybe a 12 volts AC inverter and run some small stuff. So this sounds cool.

Some things to think about:

1. What frequency should I tune to for best results?

I'm thinking the high frequencies such as cell phones and microwave. The logic is since cell phones run at around 1.9 GHZ, At that frequency. That is lots of shorts per second. Resulting in more discharges per second giving even more power extraction potential. But building a tank coil at these frequencies might be next to impossible.

Another possibly is AC 60 hertz induction. Since at 60 hertz we can't really get to 1/4 wave away. Anything nearby can't work like a traditional antenna around near field. So it would have to be coupled somehow perhaps with a over sized single turn coil. Problem, I am not good at math and have not found any online resources on how to build tuned 60 hertz L/C circuits. I can run some online calculators but these values don't mean much to me on paper. Like how is a tuned L/C tank circuit supposed to look like physically at 60 hertz? How big should the loop be? If only I had something to compare then I could go with that.

2. What is the best shorting capacitor method that needs very little power and can be synchronized with input frequency such as 60 hertz. I am guessing some transistors or some micro-controllers turning on and off a relay perhaps.

Your ideas are all welcomed! :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« on: July 09, 2016, 07:00:34 PM »

Offline Magluvin

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2016, 11:51:51 PM »
Sorry. I didnt realize I had to approve new threads.

Just approved it. Will check more often.

Mags


Offline gotoluc

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2016, 04:00:49 PM »
Hi Joellagace,


Very interesting experiment. Thanks for sharing.


I don't have anything to suggest on the 60Hz but I'm interested in what you are doing.
Could you make a demo video of your circuit in operation and show your power measurements with and without sort?


Thanks for sharing


Luc

Offline telecom

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2016, 11:20:20 PM »
I was able to generate power from the sparks using crystal radio.
Sparks were coming from the ignition coil.

Radio was from a kit, and was actually picking up some stations.

I connected it to the 15 W light bulb, and it was slightly glowing, when I increased
the frequency of the sparks, it was glowing brighter.
I had to abruptly interrupt the measurements after all the phones stopped
working in my office building, and people came out to the lobby, I guess because of the noise from the sparks.


Offline gotoluc

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2016, 05:05:17 AM »
I was able to generate power from the sparks using crystal radio.
Sparks were coming from the ignition coil.

Radio was from a kit, and was actually picking up some stations.

I connected it to the 15 W light bulb, and it was slightly glowing, when I increased
the frequency of the sparks, it was glowing brighter.
I had to abruptly interrupt the measurements after all the phones stopped
working in my office building, and people came out to the lobby, I guess because of the noise from the sparks.


Hi telecom,


are you also user joellagace, first post of this topic?


Regarding your spark,crystal radio and 15W bulb. Could you make a short video. Hard to believe a crystal radio can make a bulb glow.


Thanks for sharing


Luc

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2016, 05:05:17 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline telecom

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2016, 06:36:25 PM »

Hi telecom,


are you also user joellagace, first post of this topic?


Regarding your spark,crystal radio and 15W bulb. Could you make a short video. Hard to believe a crystal radio can make a bulb glow.


Thanks for sharing


Luc

Hi,
sorry, I'm not the guy, but enclosing a photo of what's left of the set up:
you can see a spark gap, the ignition coil and the tuning coil from the radio, also the cap.
I removed the actual light bulb holder and you can see Arduino on its spot, for another project.
Regards

Offline gotoluc

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2016, 11:41:09 PM »
Thanks for the pic


Can you get it working again and do some pin and pout measurements?


Thanks for sharing


Luc


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2016, 11:41:09 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline telecom

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2016, 11:53:17 PM »
Thanks for the pic


Can you get it working again and do some pin and pout measurements?


Thanks for sharing


Luc

I was thinking about it, but again, how to deal with the telephone problems in the building?
I'm still wondering how far the emf field from the sparks will penetrate - never expected for it to be
that effective!
If you wish, I will attach the bulb holder and ship it over to you for testing.
It actually works very reliably.
Alex

Offline gotoluc

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2016, 07:52:27 PM »
I was thinking about it, but again, how to deal with the telephone problems in the building?
I'm still wondering how far the emf field from the sparks will penetrate - never expected for it to be
that effective!
If you wish, I will attach the bulb holder and ship it over to you for testing.
It actually works very reliably.
Alex


Hi Alex,
that's a kind offer to be ready to ship it out.
Would it be complete or would it need some components added to make it work?


Thanks for the offer


Luc

Offline telecom

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2016, 08:19:52 PM »
Hi Luc,
you will need something to drive the ignition coil - like an interrupter or similar.
I used a 555 based input, if you don't have one, I can try looking for it here as well.
Regards
Alex

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2016, 08:19:52 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline gotoluc

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2016, 12:14:44 AM »
Hi Alex,


I sent you a PM, did you receive it?


Thanks


Luc

Offline telecom

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2016, 06:24:50 AM »
Yes, just got it - was in a place w/o Internet.
Regards


Offline joellagace

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2016, 04:08:38 PM »
Sorry all for the late reply.  The post did not show up and I thought I did something wrong.
I did some more experimenting and have made better contraptions since. Here is one of my early experiments. Part one of the circuit. It was a very sloppy and my apologizes, I don't have a lab to work with! Just a tiny apartment.

Step 1 - Getting usable power
http://radiogaga.ga/Joellagace/extracting-free-energy-from-the-air/

To explain the video, I got an Coax acting as electret and "antenna" Hanging horizontally 100 feet out the window supported at the other end to trees.

First thing I did was try and rectify what ever induced voltage to coax got from the ambient. The meter then showed a fluctuation of around 0-1 volts.  I was not even able to drive an LED with this power as is. Perhaps with a spark gap Assembly and intermittent discharges into a storing capacitor This one its own would charge over time but, This was not my goal.

How ever, Using the shield part of the coax as inducer feeding this into a tuned L/C circuit very much like how ham radio operators bring tiny HF antennas into resonance. Making the antenna act as if it was a huge 1/4. I did the same thing with this. My idea was I wanted to build a tuned L/C circuit at 60hz and couple into that. Even if just a few watts. Would be interesting! But with the equipment I had at the time, I was only able to bring this tuned L/C circuit to resonate at the 4th harmonic of 60hz. I don't understand that strange capacitor assembly. How this configuration effected the resonating frequency? I just kept adding more and more capacitors like this and the L/C meter kept showing a drop in frequency, Along with using the huge secondary of an old Tesla coil project, This thing was resonating to some nearby "Dirty" digital switching AC to DC power supply producing plenty of harmonics? Anyhow. I was then able to pull in a good solid 25 volts once rectified to DC. This was able to light an LED.

Step two (Extracting watts)  I am still working on. I need to short out this tuned L/C at the same rate as the incoming signal. I'm not sure what method works best.  Perhaps a digital switch controlled by some IC super low voltage IC enough to drive a "Shorting" relay across the tuned L/C, With some low wingdings very low resistance pick up coils, That will extract these "Shorts" Where would this extra low voltage high current go after? Who knows..... Maybe rectify it and charge DC electronics? Run an AC inverter on the DC side to run all your higher wattage 110 Volts AC device needs?


Here is a link to my video, This was early experiment of part one. I done much better since :) Anyone who can fill in some voids here please feel free to comment. Even advice on making it work better if you got some! :) Thanks

http://radiogaga.ga/Joellagace/extracting-free-energy-from-the-air/

Offline telecom

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Re: Shorting a tuned L/C circuit
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2016, 02:33:27 AM »
Hi Joel,
great work!
You can try automotive ignition coil as a step down transformer.
Just an idea.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


 

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