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Author Topic: The bearing motor  (Read 34975 times)

Offline allcanadian

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #30 on: June 01, 2015, 07:05:27 PM »
@Tinman


I think the fact that it runs in either direction and runs on AC may negate a unidirectional force as it applies to the basic rail gun circuit. We should remember the races are closed loops acting on multiple ball bearings thus the low resistance current path through the race to each ball bearing is fairly uniform. Logically the races cannot act like a one turn coil when the current/field should act equally in both directions simultaneously around the race to multiple evenly spaced points on the race to the ball bearings. As such all the forces should balance which may explain why it cannot self-start.


The best clue we have yet is that an "Alternating Current" producing a unidirectional force almost exclusively implies an inductive process producing a leading/lagging field phenomena. As well the fact that it will not self-start until a permanent magnetic or induced external magnetic field are present also suggests a leading/lagging field phenomena.

AC

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #30 on: June 01, 2015, 07:05:27 PM »

Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #31 on: June 01, 2015, 08:26:47 PM »
Like I said earlier, I believe the thing has to be set into motion to provide an offset in the fields.

The way I see it, when we apply current initially, the fields are probably balanced, no motion. But while current is flowing, when the thing is put into motion, the fields in the balls most likely bend the fields produced by the balls, and this offset probably gets greater with speed. So this would explain the how of working in either direction. Spin one way, and the offset is in place for that direction of spin, and likewise the other direction.


When we apply a biasing magnet to the system, the offset is already there. The fields created by currents in the system become altered and off balance without the push start.

Maybe this can be drawn up on FEMM to see what the fields look like, around the balls and the races.  I dont know if there is a FEMM prog that shows fields developed by electrical currents.


In my vid of the magnet rolling on the foil, if it were just a solid iron disk, it probably would not move, until we moved it while current is running through it. 

So it is possible that in the videos of a AA battery with a magnet and a wire simple motors, that the magnet could be replaced by an iron disk, then give it a spin in either direction.  ??? ;D


Mags

Mags

Quote
Like I said earlier, I believe the thing has to be set into motion to provide an offset in the fields.

The way I see it, when we apply current initially, the fields are probably balanced, no motion. But while current is flowing, when the thing is put into motion, the fields in the balls most likely bend the fields produced by the balls, and this offset probably gets greater with speed. So this would explain the how of working in either direction. Spin one way, and the offset is in place for that direction of spin, and likewise the other direction.

This statement is very important,and the sole reason i have spent the time on this project. In this situation we need to apply an electrical current to create magnetic field's.
 Now,think about this very carfully
For this motor to work,it dose NOT need an AC current. This motor will work just as well on a direct current<--Do you know what that means??. This means that the magnetic fields being created do not change. This also means that if we know what and where these magnetic fields are,we can replace the DC current that creates these magnetic fields with PM's.

Im hoping MH will stick with us on this one,as i believe that an all magnet motor could actually be designed from this bearing motor. There is no magnetic field created by DC current that cannot be created by PM's. I believe that MH him self said that the fields within a DC electromagnet are no different to that of a PM's field.

Why dose it take a DC current to create the magnetic field around the wire to get the simple 1 battery homopolar motor spining?. What is different to the field around the wire carrying the current than of the field around a PM?.

Tomorrow i will try placeing a PM on the outer bearing housing,and see what happens. Then i will place one on the shaft near the inner race,and see what happens.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline MileHigh

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #32 on: June 01, 2015, 08:35:49 PM »
Check out this guy.  He should enter into the next pulse motor build off!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSlgoyro520

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEJtHyv2Rqo

Offline MileHigh

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #33 on: June 01, 2015, 09:24:21 PM »
Well I am going to run with AC's rail-gun-bearing-race analogy.

For starters, the bearing version is not as "clean" as the rail gun.  In the rail gun, each rail has current flow only up to the point of were the sliding cross-bar conductor is.  There is no current flow past the current position of the sliding cross-bar.   But in a circular bearing, the current can be sourced both from behind and ahead of the moving ball bearing, and that screws up the "required" magnetic field that you need to interact with the current flowing across the ball bearing.

Nevertheless, let's just put that problem aside and imagine that the two races of the ball bearing act like the rails in a rail gun.  In other words, they generate the required orthogonal magnetic field relative to the current flowing across the ball bearing.

I am ignoring the problems to get here:   You can model the force on the ball bearing as a single vector pushing tangentially on the dead center of the bearing.   If the ball bearing "sticks" to the inner race and "pushes on" the outer race then let's say that the outer ring of the ball bearing rotates clockwise while the axle remains fixed.  However, if the ball bearing "sticks" to the outer race and "pushes on" the inner race, then we can say that the axle will turn clockwise and the outer ring of the ball bearing remains fixed.  Note however, if the axle must remain fixed, then the outer ring of the ball bearing will turn counter-clockwise instead.

So, what this means is that if you assume that the bearings experience force because of the current flow, then the same force on the bearings can give you a motor that turns clockwise or counter-clockwise.  The spin direction will be determined by which way you start the motor with a push.  It depends if the bearings "stick" on the inner race and "push" on the outer race or vice-vera.


Offline allcanadian

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #34 on: June 01, 2015, 11:06:47 PM »
Hey Milehigh


Thank you for that link MH--https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEJtHyv2Rqo[/color][/font]


You know I could listen to inventors like Bill French talk all day because these guys have their feet planted firmly on the ground and yet their head way up in the clouds. It's these kinds of sincere people with so much knowledge and so many dreams that just make my day.


If there is one thing I think we can all agree on it is that at the end of the day it has to be real, it has to reasonable and understandable. We have more than enough wild ass theories out there but today we need things that work. I like your last post as well... stick and push, I never thought of that in this device however I had considered the concept in another context. Levitation was one and if an object is bouncing between two boundary conditions then one part of the time it isn't actually touching anything. It is levitating with very little friction just not all the time which kind put's a new spin on the concept of all or nothing.


AC




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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #34 on: June 01, 2015, 11:06:47 PM »
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Offline Magluvin

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #35 on: June 01, 2015, 11:33:03 PM »
This statement is very important,and the sole reason i have spent the time on this project. In this situation we need to apply an electrical current to create magnetic field's.
 Now,think about this very carfully
For this motor to work,it dose NOT need an AC current. This motor will work just as well on a direct current<--Do you know what that means??. This means that the magnetic fields being created do not change. This also means that if we know what and where these magnetic fields are,we can replace the DC current that creates these magnetic fields with PM's.

Im hoping MH will stick with us on this one,as i believe that an all magnet motor could actually be designed from this bearing motor. There is no magnetic field created by DC current that cannot be created by PM's. I believe that MH him self said that the fields within a DC electromagnet are no different to that of a PM's field.

Why dose it take a DC current to create the magnetic field around the wire to get the simple 1 battery homopolar motor spining?. What is different to the field around the wire carrying the current than of the field around a PM?.

Tomorrow i will try placeing a PM on the outer bearing housing,and see what happens. Then i will place one on the shaft near the inner race,and see what happens.


Imagine current flowing in the balls of the bearing, say from the outer race to the inner race, while the bearing is stationary. Each ball bearing will have a field around them like say the rings of saturn. The field spin will be on axis with the current flow. So when we give the bearing a spin, the rings around saturn will tilt a bit, become off axis. This is the offset Im thinking of.  Ac or DC, doesnt matter. Once set in motion, the offsets and race fields will still be set in a way that what ever current direction may be, all of the fields developed by the balls and races just reverse, causing continued rotation with each phase of current flow. DC is probably best. Not sure yet. AC may cause more heat due to fluctuating fields in the bearing material.

Mags

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #36 on: June 02, 2015, 01:59:15 AM »
Check out this guy.  He should enter into the next pulse motor build off!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSlgoyro520

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEJtHyv2Rqo

OK.  I read the info in the link from the video and I get how it spins...but how the hell does it levitate?  Energy comes from solar cells but...those other levitating devices take some real power so...how is this hovering?????????  I saw no pm in the base at all and certainly no electro-mag.  I am very impressed and confused at the same time.  If I had $145, I would buy one.

Bill

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #36 on: June 02, 2015, 01:59:15 AM »
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Offline Magluvin

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #37 on: June 02, 2015, 03:31:14 AM »


Tomorrow i will try placeing a PM on the outer bearing housing,and see what happens. Then i will place one on the shaft near the inner race,and see what happens.

Its possible that placing one mag somewhere on the outer race may not produce an equal offset on all the balls. Try anyway though.  Im thinking one at the end of the shaft, like N or S in and one at the other end of the shaft, trying N then S in. Same poles in, say N in, then the whole shaft will emanate N field.  Then also a N in on one end and S in on the other could be the way to go also.

Then again, it may not help at all. lol   So try as many mag positions as possible as to not miss anything.  If the mags help but self starting doesnt work but seems to bias the rotor more in one direction than the other, then a stronger mag is needed.

Mags


Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #38 on: June 02, 2015, 04:09:04 AM »
OK.  I read the info in the link from the video and I get how it spins...but how the hell does it levitate?  Energy comes from solar cells but...those other levitating devices take some real power so...how is this hovering?????????  I saw no pm in the base at all and certainly no electro-mag.  I am very impressed and confused at the same time.  If I had $145, I would buy one.

Bill
It's floating in fluid Bill. ;)

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #39 on: June 02, 2015, 04:49:14 AM »
It's floating in fluid Bill. ;)

Oh...Duh!  I read about the sphere within the sphere but it looked like he was so careful in placing it on the stand like it was in hover position.  I just looked again and...who the heck would pay 140 bucks for that?

OK, now I feel stupid.

Thanks for the explanation Brad.

Bill

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #39 on: June 02, 2015, 04:49:14 AM »
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Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #40 on: June 02, 2015, 06:16:45 AM »
Oh...Duh!  I read about the sphere within the sphere but it looked like he was so careful in placing it on the stand like it was in hover position.  I just looked again and...who the heck would pay 140 bucks for that?

OK, now I feel stupid.

Thanks for the explanation Brad.

Bill
Lol,all good,as i was wondering the same thing -until i watched the second video lol.

Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #41 on: June 02, 2015, 06:22:00 AM »
Its possible that placing one mag somewhere on the outer race may not produce an equal offset on all the balls. Try anyway though.  Im thinking one at the end of the shaft, like N or S in and one at the other end of the shaft, trying N then S in. Same poles in, say N in, then the whole shaft will emanate N field.  Then also a N in on one end and S in on the other could be the way to go also.

Then again, it may not help at all. lol   So try as many mag positions as possible as to not miss anything.  If the mags help but self starting doesnt work but seems to bias the rotor more in one direction than the other, then a stronger mag is needed.

Mags
Mag's,MH-anyone.
Im looking at the homopolar motor(the simple 1 battery/magnet combo),and i see a uniform magnetic field around the wire,immersed in a uniform magnetic field around the PM. How dose this create a force in one direction to create the motoring effect?.The battery is only there to create a current flow that creates a magnetic field around the wire-correct?


Offline Magluvin

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #42 on: June 02, 2015, 07:00:19 AM »
Mag's,MH-anyone.
Im looking at the homopolar motor(the simple 1 battery/magnet combo),and i see a uniform magnetic field around the wire,immersed in a uniform magnetic field around the PM. How dose this create a force in one direction to create the motoring effect?.The battery is only there to create a current flow that creates a magnetic field around the wire-correct?

Yeah, weird stuff.  I wonder if we eliminate the mag, if the wire would spin in either direction, with a little push.

I believe the field of the side of the magnet that is touching the battery is attracted to the battery like a core and that field flowers out from the sides of the battery. Say it is N contacting the battery, then the outside surface of the battery emanates N pole field all around it. So now we have the wire with current flowing wile it is constantly in that N field and the wire moves. Faraday. ;)

Ill try and do some tests as I get time to do so. 

Mags

Offline MileHigh

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #43 on: June 02, 2015, 07:27:36 AM »
Mag's,MH-anyone.
Im looking at the homopolar motor(the simple 1 battery/magnet combo),and i see a uniform magnetic field around the wire,immersed in a uniform magnetic field around the PM. How dose this create a force in one direction to create the motoring effect?.The battery is only there to create a current flow that creates a magnetic field around the wire-correct?

Just make a diagram of the homopolar motor and work it out for yourself like I tried a few postings ago for the bearing motor.  Before you tackle the bearing motor you want to be able to explain the homopolar motor and you may as well throw in explaining the aquarium vortex and bubbles business if you want.

All of the basic concepts have already been stated in the past week, so there is no point in repeating them.  It just a question of applying the concepts to the homopolar motor setup.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Pirate88179

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #44 on: June 02, 2015, 07:30:13 AM »
Mag's,MH-anyone.
Im looking at the homopolar motor(the simple 1 battery/magnet combo),and i see a uniform magnetic field around the wire,immersed in a uniform magnetic field around the PM. How dose this create a force in one direction to create the motoring effect?.The battery is only there to create a current flow that creates a magnetic field around the wire-correct?

The one I made was simple.  Just a D cell with a metal screw held onto the bottom via the flux from a neo cylinder which was hanging from the screw.  Just touch the frayed end of a wire from the + on the bat. to the mag. and it spins up very fast.  I never did try to reverse polarity to see if it spun the other way.  I can give that a try.

Bill

PS  I should add that I have no idea why this works like it does.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #44 on: June 02, 2015, 07:30:13 AM »

 

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