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Author Topic: The bearing motor  (Read 34942 times)

Offline tinman

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The bearing motor
« on: May 29, 2015, 05:10:41 AM »
Im sure most of you have seen one,but how many here know how it work's?

Well it's time we found the answer ;)
Most seem to think that the heat generated within the balls of the bearing race,distort the balls shape into an elliptical shape,and cause rotation. But i dont think they have given much thought to this conclusion. If you stop and think about how fast each ball is actually spining,then there is just not enough time for them to change shape that fast-->remember,each ball will do about 10 rotations to each rotation of the shaft. And then there is the fact that in the average bearing race there is 10 to 12 balls. Each of these balls could carry a whole lot of current befor it got even close to glowing red-and there is 10 of them to carry the current.

Below is a video,and here you will see two copper wires on the base that carry the current to the bearings from the conection terminals. So we are expected to believe these two copper wires can carry enough current as to be able to heat 10(high temperature hardened steel balls to the point where they will distort enough to produce enough torque to spin that flywheel up that fast ::)

My belief is that magnetic fields are at play here,and i think it's time we found out for sure. Some might think-whats the point?,but think about it for a while. This motor/device can rotate in either direction on either a DC or AC current,so what kind of magnetic field would allow it's force to be governed by an initial spin?.

I would think right from the start that there will be a large magnetic field around the shaft of the device that is carrying all that current to the other bearing race. I would also think that there would be magnetic fields produced by each one of the four single turn coils(the inner and outer bearing race housings). If this is the case,what would the rotating balls within the housings do to those magnetic fields-->which i might add,would be at right angles to the field produced by the shaft.

Anyway,i built one of these many years ago,and never gave it much thought. But i now realise what significance this could have if it is magnetic fields at play here. Would this offer some sort of proof to the SEG,but opperating in reverse?.

On with the build.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7LOF1GZpdo

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The bearing motor
« on: May 29, 2015, 05:10:41 AM »

Offline Magluvin

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2015, 07:18:53 AM »
Seems to have a lot of torque.  Its odd that current runs through one bearing opposite of the other but both drive the same direction.  Makes me think that the wires could be just connected the the ends of the axle and give it a spin.  Other than that, the balls rotating with current through them must be altering the fields they produce, setting up a continuous push pull field orientation.  But for it to be able to spin either direction regardless of the current direction is the puzzle.

Mags

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Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2015, 12:52:50 PM »
Glad you popped in Mag's,i was hoping you would.
Here is the first run with the bearing motor.
It dosnt seem to go to well at all on 30 amp's  I have a feeling that it is the aluminum pully upsetting the magnetic fields some how  I also found it odd that the pully got warmer than the bearing housings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkrJ_uI9nWs

Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2015, 04:57:06 PM »
New transformer built and tested for the experimenting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=916Iy1sZCrE


Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2015, 04:58:31 PM »
In this video,we find something quite interesting.
Also it seems that if to much current is applied,then the motor actually slows down.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIP_ip0iUjs

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2015, 04:58:31 PM »
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Offline PiCéd

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2015, 07:50:25 PM »
I hope to be wrong, but if there were two separate devices in series on the same circuit I do not think one of them would turn as fast as if there was only one on the circuit and with the same value in amperes.
Especially if it's half as fast.

Offline minnie

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2015, 11:58:31 PM »



   Silly Tinman,
                   burning PCDD's in the confines of his shed.
    Also looked like at one point he was running a high speed
    rotor without bearing caps?
    Please take care Tinman.
               John.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2015, 11:58:31 PM »
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Offline Magluvin

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2015, 05:02:49 AM »
Glad you popped in Mag's,i was hoping you would.
Here is the first run with the bearing motor.
It dosnt seem to go to well at all on 30 amp's  I have a feeling that it is the aluminum pully upsetting the magnetic fields some how  I also found it odd that the pully got warmer than the bearing housings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkrJ_uI9nWs

Hey Tin

The bearings in Roberts vid seem larger in diameter. Maybe that is the difference in performance here. ;)   That is a 'maybe'. Since you have said that the pulley was warmer than the bearings, its possible something else is happening to make it turn.

Ive put aside the issue with the idea of current flowing through one bearing differently than the other, being that since the thing will go in either direction, so the bearing current direction should not matter.


How about no pulley? That would narrow things down a bit as to what is happening. If it spins faster, then most likely the pulley is not an actor in the motoring going on. or how about a short axle shaft and bearings closer to the pulley, or just closer to each other.

I have a large bearing from a car belt tensioner ill try some things with. It has been cleaned out and worked in with graphite. So it should move with little effort. These are roller pin bearings.  Im just going to work with the bearing alone first.

Neat stuff though. TK made a vid of one a while back.

It would be good to fully understand the function.  Like, could it be possible to have magnet spheres as the balls in the bearing and if we give it a spin, would it keep on going?  Imagining the fields around the balls as current flows through them, it would be difficult to create a magnet as such.  Just thinking though of the possibilities.

Mags

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2015, 08:40:55 AM »
For some reason, I think this is like a homopolar motor except, there is no magnet.  Unless the shaft is acting as an electromagnet somehow?  I think the bearings are just passing the energy through to the shaft and the balls in the bearing are nothing more than contact areas which allow the current to pass to the shaft.

Total guess on my part though.  Very cool motor Tinman.

Bill

Offline shylo

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2015, 11:21:29 AM »
Nice set-up Tinman easy to switch out rotors.
Could you mount 2 magnets around the outside of the armature ,the poles lined up with the legs of the coils wound on it , put some brushes on the commutator, see what comes out?
Also I liked the way you tested for current.LOL.
Great vids thanks.
artv

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2015, 11:21:29 AM »
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Offline ekimtoor1

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2015, 05:08:10 PM »
If in fact the motion happens because of distortion in the ball bearings due to resistance and heat, and there are many convincing explanations of this effect, then it should be possible to make ball bearings from that new non-joulian alloy that has the large magnetostrictive effect when exposed to a magnetic field. a bearing made from this alloy would distort similarly when exposed to a magnetic field?  Would probably need a strong one just the same as you need enough electricity with the plain bearing to drive it.

Offline allcanadian

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2015, 06:36:13 PM »
@tinman


I think the bearing motor seems pretty straight forward however the problem is abstract and a little misleading if we cannot see it for what it is.
It is the Lorentz Force, in the picture below we have a rail gun and if we simply replace the rails with the outer races of our bearings on each end and the projectile with our balls in the bearings we have a two rail rotary rail gun. Now one would think the currents moving in opposite directions at each end bearing would cancel. However fundamentally the moving balls which carry the current in the bearing are the moving projectile as below rolling along the outer race/rails and the inner race and connecting shaft are simply conductors connected to the shaft as below which rotate with the ball in the bearing.


Thus it is really no different than the picture below where the shaft across two parallel rails which carry current moves the shaft which is riding on the conductive rails. Now if in the picture below we simply placed the moving shaft on a conductive ball at each end of the shaft on the rail and the ball moved/rotated with the shaft then we have a linear ball bearing motor very much like our ball bearing motor where the ball/projectile just so happens to rotate around the outer race/rail of the bearing connected to the inner race/shaft. It seems very easy to understand and based on basic well known phenomena. It is just that the complexity of what we think we see has obscured the simplicity of it as is often the case.

AC


Offline tinman

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2015, 07:52:02 PM »
@tinman


I think the bearing motor seems pretty straight forward however the problem is abstract and a little misleading if we cannot see it for what it is.
It is the Lorentz Force, in the picture below we have a rail gun and if we simply replace the rails with the outer races of our bearings on each end and the projectile with our balls in the bearings we have a two rail rotary rail gun. Now one would think the currents moving in opposite directions at each end bearing would cancel. However fundamentally the moving balls which carry the current in the bearing are the moving projectile as below rolling along the outer race/rails and the inner race and connecting shaft are simply conductors connected to the shaft as below which rotate with the ball in the bearing.


Thus it is really no different than the picture below where the shaft across two parallel rails which carry current moves the shaft which is riding on the conductive rails. Now if in the picture below we simply placed the moving shaft on a conductive ball at each end of the shaft on the rail and the ball moved/rotated with the shaft then we have a linear ball bearing motor very much like our ball bearing motor where the ball/projectile just so happens to rotate around the outer race/rail of the bearing connected to the inner race/shaft. It seems very easy to understand and based on basic well known phenomena. It is just that the complexity of what we think we see has obscured the simplicity of it as is often the case.

AC
And the motor can run in either direction with either a DC or AC current how?

Offline MileHigh

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2015, 09:48:39 PM »
AC has it right, it works on the magnetic component of the Lorentz force.  So, it works just like just about any other motor, they are just making it difficult to visualize how and where the Lorentz force is acting.

However, you have some huge "clues" to arrive at the answer.  You know the force in question has to apply torque to the motor, so you know its direction.  So that limits the places in the motor where torque can actually be applied.  Then all that you have to find is other two orthogonal vectors, the current flow and the magnetic field.  Where does that "fit" in the motor?

Then, ideally you would make a simplified drawing or drawings that explain how the motor works.

I think that it's important to mention that even before you even start, you already know how it works.  That's a fundamental realization.

It's not surprising that when you change the polarity of the applied voltage the motor continues in the same direction.  Figure the motor out, and the reason for this will become self-evident.

Tinman said that it can rotate in either direction.  I did a quick check and I disagree, it looks like the motor will always turn in the same direction, for both a regular and a reversed battery connection.  I looked at the rail gun and noted that the rail gun will also shoot in the same direction when you change the polarity.

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Offline Magluvin

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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2015, 11:36:40 PM »


Tinman said that it can rotate in either direction.  I did a quick check and I disagree, it looks like the motor will always turn in the same direction, for both a regular and a reversed battery connection.  I looked at the rail gun and noted that the rail gun will also shoot in the same direction when you change the polarity.

Quick check?  ::) Tin says it doesnt start till you give it a spin, in either direction of rotation and continues in that direction of rotation no matter the polarity of input. Are you saying he lying? ::)

From what I understand, a rail gun is directional and doesnt require a push start.

Mags




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Re: The bearing motor
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2015, 11:36:40 PM »

 

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