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Author Topic: Switchable Magnets.  (Read 23836 times)

Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #60 on: May 17, 2015, 04:21:45 AM »
Hi Syncro,

I finally got around to making some measurements.
(promised in the other thread - An Ingenious Way to Turn Neodymium Permanent Magnets On and Off - Magswitch. . .)
I had a welding project going on and didn't want to disassemble the earth clamp.


Details.
Magswitch 300 amp ground clamp part no WG300MS

I used a spring balance to find the force (torque) required to open/close the magnet.

Max required (towards the end of the closing stroke)
5.4 lbs at 1.75 inc dia.
So about 0.4 lb ft.

Same for both Open/Close. (except that the max on open is near the beginning of the stroke)



Next, I mounted the MagSwich in my drill press.
This was so I could carefully position it near the workpiece using the vernier action of the (expensive) drill press.


1st, using a 1.04 lb wrench lying flat and unsecured on the drill press table,
the magswitch in the on position, needed to get to 0.23 inches before the wrench was lifted into contact.

2nd, using a 48 lb tractor (mild steel) tractor weight lying flat and unsecured on the drill press table,
the magswitch in the on position, needed to get to 0.05 inches before the weight was lifted into contact.



Are there any other tests you would like ?

Thanks

Pete

@PIH123,

Thanks for running the test!

I found this video of the "Magnet Switch" you tested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8cKscZ-eM8


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #60 on: May 17, 2015, 04:21:45 AM »

Offline Turbo

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #61 on: May 17, 2015, 08:22:25 AM »
There is no such thing as 'switchable magnets'
Magnetism is a property of space, it is space itself that is magnetised.
That is why we are able to communicate with rosetta at millions of miles away.
What you see around a magnet it is an effect brought out by space itself, it is because the magnetic field lines as you call them can more easily pass through the magnet then they can pass through air and that is why you observe a concentrated area around and in these magnets, if you were to remove space itself you would be left with a non magnetic lump of metal.
So if you would use the term 'switchable space' then that would be a better fit.

The weird part is that the evidence is available you can create magnetic fields in empty space by using high voltage, and if you use for example graphite as your output terminals, there isn't even metal around yet still the magnetic field, or better said, polarized space, pops up revealing all these magnetic effects, and then there are the copper coils, not magnetic by itself but once powered up again, these magnetic effects show up, this is evidence that these effects are a property of space itself, and it is staring you in your face, but still most people believe this magnetic field somehow orginates from the magnet while it has got nothing to do it is more like a lenz concentrating light.

You would not believe me if i said the light comes from the lenz that is concentrating it, because your eyes are able to detect the source of the light.
With magnetism this is not so, and because of that most people are stuck in the continous error believe the field comes from the magnet.
It is a result of not seeing the light or the source of the field, air is to a magnetic field what a resistor is to current, a currant needs to flow, where a magnetic field needs to move to work with, the evidence is all around you, you are wasting your time trying to get light out of a lenz that sit's in darkness, so what can you do? the answer is clear, it is movement of space itself, which has a direct proportion to the light intensity falling on the lenz, example.
The faster you make space move, the more magnetic effects you witness, there are thresholds that need to be reached, like you see in the speed of sound barrier, the speed of light, so has the magnetic field specific limits where things change, and might i say, other things, things not readily understood yet start to show up, so you either try to get your magnet to move at the speed of light,good luck with that, or you find a way to speed up the field or space itself.
There can be no current flow since this limits or acts like a brake and so that means it needs to have a static character, which is all good since volatage is cheap right, and it can be used for a long time, without current flow.   

The question then becomes , how do you switch a static charge ?
There is more to it but that would be a good start and a relay can do it, but not fast enough, what else?

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #62 on: May 17, 2015, 08:29:04 AM »
@PIH123,

Thanks for running the test!

I found this video of the "Magnet Switch" you tested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8cKscZ-eM8

Wow.  That is a really small one.  I have never seen one like this.

Bill

PS  https://mag-tools.com/magswitch-600-amp-switchable-magnetic-ground-clamp.html

This small one has a 200 pound breakaway.  For its size, that is pretty good but, is is over $100 US.

Offline norman6538

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #63 on: May 17, 2015, 01:32:08 PM »
Pete thanks for the tests but you need to convert that into ft/lbs and compare
the force to turn it on to the work done ft/lbs then you know if its over unity.
The wrench would have been about 1/4 ft/lbs of work done but not sure what the
work required to turn the magnet on was. Can you supply that?
thanks,
You need to get work in vs work out.

This has been around for awhile so I can't imagine it has been overlooked.

Norman


Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #64 on: May 24, 2015, 09:53:36 PM »
John Bedini showed how to easily grow large "Rochelle Salt" crystals for practically nothing. I was surprised to learn they generate the most Piezoelectricity. They grow like "RockCandy".

Piezoelectricity is the ability of certain materials to produce a voltage when subjected to mechanical stress. Piezoelectric materials also show the opposite effect, called converse piezoelectricity, where application of an electrical field creates mechanical stress (size modification) in the crystal.

piezoelectric 01

Figure 1 Piezoelectric effect

The effect known as piezoelectricity was discovered by brothers Pierre and Jacques Curie; they showed that crystals of tourmaline, quartz, topaz, cane sugar, and Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate tetra hydrate) generate electric charge from mechanical stress. Quartz and Rochelle salt exhibited the most piezoelectricity.

The relationship between force and electricity is converse; The material compresses when electrified, and generates electricity when pressured.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #64 on: May 24, 2015, 09:53:36 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #65 on: May 24, 2015, 10:37:38 PM »
Here's a good video on growing the Crystals from "Cream of Tarter" and "Baking Soda":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1Ct3VUWvhQ

Offline Pirate88179

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #66 on: May 24, 2015, 11:41:30 PM »
John Bedini showed how to easily grow large "Rochelle Salt" crystals for practically nothing. I was surprised to learn they generate the most Piezoelectricity. They grow like "RockCandy".

Piezoelectricity is the ability of certain materials to produce a voltage when subjected to mechanical stress. Piezoelectric materials also show the opposite effect, called converse piezoelectricity, where application of an electrical field creates mechanical stress (size modification) in the crystal.

piezoelectric 01

Figure 1 Piezoelectric effect

The effect known as piezoelectricity was discovered by brothers Pierre and Jacques Curie; they showed that crystals of tourmaline, quartz, topaz, cane sugar, and Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate tetra hydrate) generate electric charge from mechanical stress. Quartz and Rochelle salt exhibited the most piezoelectricity.

The relationship between force and electricity is converse; The material compresses when electrified, and generates electricity when pressured.

Also, as I can speak from experience here, if you heat a piezo material, and discharge it while it is heated, it builds up a like charge when it cools and can be discharged again.

We had a job machining some piezo disks about the size of a hockey puck.  Like a lot of our ceramic machining, what we would do is to wax the pucks down to precision ground steel plates, (which held fast to the magnetic chucks on the grinders) surface grind the first side and then, demount them, clean them, and use a vacuum chuck to hold them to do the second side and take them to final thickness.

Well, we heated them up in order to wax them to our steel plates.  I accidentally got my finger near one of the pucks and a huge spark jumped out and bit my finger from about 1/4" away!  It really hurt!  So, I figured we needed to be careful with this material from now on when heating it up.  Once cooled, I went to mount the plates onto the surface grinder, and ZAP! I got hit again.  I called the engineer that we were doing this job for and he explained that if heated, it builds up a huge charge of thousand of volts. (no kidding)  Then, if discharged when hot, it cools and builds up a similar charge again.  I think the material might have been barium titanate but I can't really remember now.

Here is a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barium_titanate

Anyway, I just wanted to show that besides mechanical compression/decompression, piezos can also build charge in the way described above.

Bill

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #66 on: May 24, 2015, 11:41:30 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #67 on: May 24, 2015, 11:46:34 PM »
Also, as I can speak from experience here, if you heat a piezo material, and discharge it while it is heated, it builds up a like charge when it cools and can be discharged again.

We had a job machining some piezo disks about the size of a hockey puck.  Like a lot of our ceramic machining, what we would do is to wax the pucks down to precision ground steel plates, (which held fast to the magnetic chucks on the grinders) surface grind the first side and then, demount them, clean them, and use a vacuum chuck to hold them to do the second side and take them to final thickness.

Well, we heated them up in order to wax them to our steel plates.  I accidentally got my finger near one of the pucks and a huge spark jumped out and bit my finger from about 1/4" away!  It really hurt!  So, I figured we needed to be careful with this material from now on when heating it up.  Once cooled, I went to mount the plates onto the surface grinder, and ZAP! I got hit again.  I called the engineer that we were doing this job for and he explained that if heated, it builds up a huge charge of thousand of volts. (no kidding)  Then, if discharged when hot, it cools and builds up a similar charge again.  I think the material might have been barium titanate but I can't really remember now.

Here is a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barium_titanate

Anyway, I just wanted to show that besides mechanical compression/decompression, piezos can also build charge in the way described above.

Bill

@Pirate88179,

It's possible to mold the "Rochelle Salt Crystal"; Look at the behemoth below: Molding "Barium Titanate Powder" into large ceramic blocks would work even bettor but cost a lot more. I bet this huge Crystal would light some bulbs vised by a "Magnet Chuck".

Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #68 on: May 25, 2015, 02:29:26 AM »
This $300.00 "Dog House Climate Control System" and a sealed box would supply the strict uniform cooling temperature necessary to grow a  super sized "Rochelle Salt Crystal" like the one pictured above. A high heat ceramic kiln would be be needed to forge a "Barium Titanate" block from powder. A sufficient number of these large "Piezoelectric Crystals" coupled with the stable switch cost of multiple "Daisy Chained" Magnet Chucks should hit "Pay dirt" at some point.

Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #69 on: May 25, 2015, 03:59:35 AM »
This is pure "Potassium bitartrate". 20 pounds would cost $172.00 including shipping.

Cream Of Tartar, 10 Lb Bag
from Angelina's Gourmet

Price: $75.25  ($75.25 / bag)  + $10.75 shipping   

A large Spaghetti pot, and a rectangular "mold form" positioned in the "Dog House" cooling box would crystallize a pure "Potassium bitartrate" slurry into a 20 pound Piezoelectric brick overnight for $172.00! Power 24/7 rain or shine!

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #69 on: May 25, 2015, 03:59:35 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #70 on: May 25, 2015, 06:34:04 AM »
Moore

"At the same time Nicolson was producing composite crystals, Roy W. Moore at General Electric’s Research Laboratory in Schenectady, NY, was working on a method to produce large perfect crystals.  Nicholson’s pots look pretty unsophisticated compared to Moore’s apparatus shown in Figure 017. (below) His crystals were grown within an electrically heated temperature controlled crock. In fact, the temperature was accurately controlled to within 0.1C by way of a modified mercury thermometer thermostat. His patent for the process (#1,347,350) was filed February 26, 1918 which was actually a few months earlier than Nicholson".

The large perfect "Rochelle Salt Crystal" at the bottom weighed 2 kilograms. One that size would cost $43.00 in "Potassium bitartrate" including shipping.

"Rochelle salt can be grown into large crystals and is a favorable material for scientific study.  In 1824 Sir David Brewster noticed that the crystal produced electricity when heated or what is called pyroelectricity.  Brothers Pierre and Paul Jacques Curie were the first to identify that Rochelle salt was also piezoelectric in 1880.  In other words, it generated electricity in response to being mechanically distorted.  You can imagine that heating something probably also causes it to physically distort all by itself.

In fact, Rochelle salt is orders of magnitude more piezoelectric than just about any other substance.  It remains to this day one of the most piezoelectric substances ever found.  Perhaps not surprisingly, the process works in reverse where applying electricity to the crystal causes it to physically distort".



Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #71 on: May 25, 2015, 07:06:26 AM »
Taking a hint from Roy W. Moore's patent; A "Tropical Fish Aquarium Water Heater" in a double tank would keep the temperature regulated to close to within 0.1 degree centigrade for a lot less then the "Dog House Climate Controller".
« Last Edit: May 25, 2015, 09:34:00 AM by synchro1 »


Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #72 on: May 25, 2015, 07:33:13 AM »
"Ebo Jager has the best reputation for aquarium heaters.  They use thicker glass, which reduces breakage.  Their heaters have a precision of half a degree Fahrenheit and are adjustable from 64 - 94 degrees".

0.1 Centigrade is 0.18 Fahrenheit. The Ebo Jager comes pretty close to that at .50 degrees Fahrenheit.

This very powerful 300 Watt Jager costs ten times less then the "Dog House Climate Control" unit. This tidy highly efficient economical little unit does practically everything Roy W. Moore's exotic patent of 1918 did for growing perfect "Rochelle Salt Crystals".


EHEIM Jager Aquarium Thermostat Heater 300W
by Eheim
$30.10



Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #73 on: May 25, 2015, 08:59:08 PM »
This product is pure with no additives from Amazon. We have to start here to grow a perfect Crystal.

Potassium Sodium Tartrate "Rochelle Salt" / 4 Ounces / 99.9% Pure / USP Food Grade / SHIPS FAST FROM USA
by Loudwolf:
 
Price: $7.99  + $4.68 shipping

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline synchro1

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Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #74 on: May 25, 2015, 10:58:23 PM »
The problem with regular aquarium heater is that that the "Rochelle Salt Solution" has to start cooling at 106º Fahrenheit, too high a temperature for the Jaeger. The "Mini Temperature Controller" is a much better solution pictured in the next post with a 0.1º sensitivity and a range from the freezing tooling of water. It's only about $20.00, all it needs is the heating element. 



Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Switchable Magnets.
« Reply #74 on: May 25, 2015, 10:58:23 PM »

 

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