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Author Topic: H2 storage using toasted chicken feathers  (Read 4119 times)

Offline Leon Knook

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  • Posts: 3
H2 storage using toasted chicken feathers
« on: April 06, 2014, 03:44:54 PM »
Hello all,

Is there anyone here who has done some experiments with toasted chicken feathers?
They seems to act like nano tubes who can store up to 200 times more hydrogen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=k4Hzq2HwT3w


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090623120833.htm

Must be easy to test and I'm willing to do that, but if there are people out here who has been there it is always good to know some basics already done.

Kind regards,

Leon Knook.



Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Newton II

  • Sr. Member
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  • Posts: 283
Re: H2 storage using toasted chicken feathers
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2014, 02:35:40 AM »

Why toasted chicken feathers?  Why not an ordinary sponge?  Just as a sponge holds air or water in its microscopic pores, it can hold hydrogen also.

Drop a dry chalk piece in water and see what happens.  Air bubbles emerge out of chalk piece and move up through water.  Any porous material with microscopic pores can hold gases in its pores.


Offline Leon Knook

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  • Posts: 3
Re: H2 storage using toasted chicken feathers
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2014, 09:28:18 AM »
So your answer is no and your are adding another question with a new suggestion for a new material. Thats one of the reasons so many topics get unreadable with toughts and thinks. You should start a new topic with a sponge question.

Offline CANGAS

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  • Posts: 235
Re: H2 storage using toasted chicken feathers
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2014, 11:29:22 AM »
Your topic is interesting. It seems to me that you have not yet fully explained the advantage you envision in your chicken feather technology. Could you explain in more detail ?

On the one hand, you can have a container, say a square box, with one cubic foot internal volume. You pump in Hydrogen until it changes to the liquid phase.

Or, on the other hand, the same container can have a maximized quantity of chicken feathers into which you infuse hydrogen gas until it will accept no more. Will it accept more Hydrogen than the same container full of liquid Hydrogen?

If yes, or, if no, could explain the practical engineering technology advantage you would claim for your chicken feather concept?

Thanks in advance.



CANGAS 18


Offline Leon Knook

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  • Posts: 3
Re: H2 storage using toasted chicken feathers
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2014, 08:15:55 PM »
I have send an email to the inventor Richard P. Wool with some questions about this technology. He was so kind to answer. After he has discovered this there was no follow up because he choose another direction in research. The absorbance of the chicken feather Nano tubes with H2 gas at room temperature is very low :( I am very glad he gave me this information it is useless to spend time on this. Nevertheless is must be interesting for the industry who is capable to work with low temperatures. Roasted chicken feathers, not for garage experimenters. I still want to store hydrogen in large containers. When I got something I will be back in a new topic.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: H2 storage using toasted chicken feathers
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2014, 08:15:55 PM »
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