Cookies-law

Cookies help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
http://www.overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please leave this website now. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

Poplamp

poplamp

CCTool

CCTool

LEDTVforSale

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

OverUnity Book

overunity principles book

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Statistics


  • *Total Posts: 489570
  • *Total Topics: 14406
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 3
  • *Guests: 236
  • *Total: 239

Facebook

Author Topic: 3D Holographic Printer with no Moveable Parts (full image printed in seconds)!  (Read 10278 times)

Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
3D Holographic Printer with no Moveable Parts (full image printed in seconds)!

A device which generates a 3D holographic image of the part to be copied, then prints the full 3D holographic image in seconds by using a transparent gel that hardens when activated by light or sound without any moving parts.  This is a 3D printer on steroids, and at a much lower cost than conventional 3D printers.  Here's a video demonstrating how to easily generate the 3D holographic image.  There's a better method than the one shown in the video, without using parabolic mirrors.  The advantage of this other method is the focal point can be outside of the working area and is cheaper to produce.  I'll post this other method later.  We can take this one step forward by placing a transparent gel where the 3D holographic image is generated.  The light which makes up this 3D holographic image will activate, cure, and harden the gel in seconds leaving behind a printed copy of the part.  The printed part will be an extremely high resolution copy of the original part.  A dental curing light can be used, and is a piece of dental equipment that is used for polymerization of light cure resin based composites.  Light-activated resins are one-part translucent polymers that cure and quickly harden when exposed to a specific light spectrum.  The resin remains liquid (thick, like syrup or honey) under normal indoor lighting which allows the user to work with the material until curing is desired by using a dental curing light or other similar activation techniques.  After curing, light-activated resin is denser than air-cured resins due to its inherent chemistry and because no mixing is required that might introduce air bubbles.  Dentists have used visible-light activated resins for decades.  Software isn't required either.

Gravock

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline DreamThinkBuild

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 566
Hi Gravoc,

That is really cool. It's amazing how fast the technology is evolving. Pretty soon we'll have GPS contour printers that can build entire buildings, layer by layer with built-in conduits for wiring and plumbing.

Looks like someone did this already in the past.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumapunku

:)


Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
There's a better method than the one shown in the video, without using parabolic mirrors.  The advantage of this other method is the focal point can be outside of the working area and is cheaper to produce.  I'll post this other method later.

Below is a description of a video on the "Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle" discovered in 1976.  Here's a detailed PDF publication on the "Double Cylindrical Point Focus Principle" which may help with the proper dimensions of the two mirrors. MirrorPlex, mirrored plexi-glass, or thin plastic mirror sheets can bend. Also, any material which can bend could be covered with reflective tape, mylar foil, etc.

The parabola has the well-known property of reflecting axis-parallel rays to a point YouTube - Parabola-Focal-Ray-Reflect

If we rotate the parabola around its axis, we create a parabolic disc, which has the well-known property of reflecting parallel rays (= planar wave-fronts) that are incident along the axis direction of the disc to a point. An animation that shows this process is available at YouTube - Parabolic Disc PointFocus

We can avoid the "astronomical costs" associated with creating (= casting) a large parabolic disc by bending two flat mirror sheets in the shape of parabolic cylinders to create an exact point focus. This is due to the

Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle:

If the focal line of the first cylinder is identical to the generating line of the parabola that is the intersection of the second cylinder with a plane perpendicular to its axis, then the incoming rays will be reflected to a perfect point.

For a proof of the DCPF principle, see http://tinyurl.com/595fsf and for an animation see YouTube - Double-Cylindrical PointFocus - animation

The DCPF principle was discovered on November 16, 1976 by Ambjörn Naeve http://tinyurl.com/5gbz8j and is demonstrated in this video by Tomas Elofsson, Gusum, Sweden, in July 1989.

Besides being easier than the ordinary parabolic disc to build in large sizes (avoiding "astronomical costs"), the DCPF has the advantage that the focal point can be placed outside of the solar influx area, where it is freely available to do work.
See http://tinyurl.com/69pusb

The DCPF also has the advantage that the number of planar approximator strips of fixed width grows LINEARLY with the overall size (since one dimension is unaffected) instead of QUADRATICALLY, as with an ordinary parabolic disc. For a comparison, see http://tinyurl.com/6xmpua and YouTube - The Archimedes Death Ray Lesson

Tuning the primary mirror:
http://tinyurl.com/5eqz3b

Tuning the secondary mirror:
http://tinyurl.com/6qt5ud

Using these DC PointFocusing mirrors, we have melted limestone (2560 deg C) in free air.
See http://tinyurl.com/6jsfd4

A VR-based lecture from October 2000 can be found at YouTube - CyberMath: PointFocus This lecture was created using CyberMath and DIVE The Dive Home Page

For more films and interactive material,
see Redirecting...
and for the story behind the DC PointFocus,
see PointFocus (This page has information on the holograms which is related to the DCPF principal).

Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
A 3D holographic multiplex printer (movie projector) has been developed using the DCPF principal. It was called the Mark IV Printer and is described in an article of Holosphere. The Mark IV printed to a film for recording and playback of the hologram, instead of using a light activated resin to produce a physical 3D copy of the hologram. What we want to do is slightly different than the Mark IV and should be much less complicated. The Mark IV demonstrates the DCPF's ability to generate 3D holograms.  With the DCPF principal, the 3D hologram generated can be seen from all directions, including the sides and underneath the hologram because the focal point can be outside and away from the working area.

Gravock


Offline DreamThinkBuild

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 566
Hi Gravock,

Thank you for all the links, some are malformed, but was still able to get to read through them.

So the idea is you take a glass aquarium like box and fill it with a clear polymer gel. Then from each of the sides you project a holograph into it allowing it to set where it intersects from the DCPF technique(?)

I'm no expert in holography so I'm trying to understand.

How do you keep an object from falling through the liquid or would you also holographically project a support grid?

In a large complicated model would it be able to evenly cure to the center?

I really like this idea it would allow models to built to quickly with a reduction in all the mechanical requirements. This would allow scaling from a small cup model all the way up to an aquarium sized model. Other polymers are heat cured so it might be possible to project infrared to cure those.

Just trying to get a simple small cube or even a 3D map (projective displacement) to print using this technique would be a breakthrough. From there the sky is the limit. Are you working on a prototype? :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Sponsored links:




Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
Hi Gravock,

Thank you for all the links, some are malformed, but was still able to get to read through them.

So the idea is you take a glass aquarium like box and fill it with a clear polymer gel. Then from each of the sides you project a holograph into it allowing it to set where it intersects from the DCPF technique(?)

I'm no expert in holography so I'm trying to understand.

How do you keep an object from falling through the liquid or would you also holographically project a support grid?

In a large complicated model would it be able to evenly cure to the center?

I really like this idea it would allow models to built to quickly with a reduction in all the mechanical requirements. This would allow scaling from a small cup model all the way up to an aquarium sized model. Other polymers are heat cured so it might be possible to project infrared to cure those.

Just trying to get a simple small cube or even a 3D map (projective displacement) to print using this technique would be a breakthrough. From there the sky is the limit. Are you working on a prototype? :)

There's a few work-arounds to help overcome the issue of the penetration depth.

1.)  Pulsed UV Technology:  What will have a deeper penetration? A 10 watt continuous lamp running for 120 seconds or a 400,000 watt pulsed lamp for 3 milliseconds? The difference in peak power is readily apparent. This is analogous to penetrating a block of wood with a nail: one could press a nail into the wood with a finger for 10 seconds without effect, or exert the same amount of energy and drive the nail instantaneously into the wood with a single strike of a hammer. Pulsed UV, like the hammer, delivers light at high peak power to achieve deep penetration.
 
2.)  Dual Cure:  If [UV] light can reach all surfaces of the part and all the resin in the casting, we can cure with Pulse UV light in only a few milliseconds.  However, if the part has dark colors or contours that shadow light penetration, then we can "dual cure" by premixing a mild amount (1%) of MEKP catalyst.  Since the hologram is only projecting the surface areas of the part (both inner and outer surfaces), then we'll need to use the "dual cure" method.  The Pulsed UV light of the hologram will cure whatever areas of resin are exposed to the UV radiation and the resin will rapidly cure and gently exotherm, warming and accelerating the other shadowed areas that are bathed in the mildly catalyzed resin.

For example, we can generate a holographic image of a hollow cylinder (see image below), and bath this UV hologram in a light activated curing resin with 1% MEKP catalyst while hitting it with a few short pulses.  After a few pulses, we can drain the resin away from the printed part and continue to provide pulses to further cure the mildly catalyzed resin between the surfaces of the outer and inner walls of the cylinder.  The purpose in draining the resin after a few quick pulses is to create the hollow portion of the cylinder (If we didn't drain the resin, then the cylinder wouldn't be hollow).  Please remember, the hologram is only projecting the surface areas of the part, and it's only the deep inner surface areas where there may be a concern in regards to the penetration depth.

Gravock

Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
I found another method to generate a holographic image using a 4d Cartesian coordinate system which can be developed in an open source program such as Panda3d or Blender.  The 3d printer will superimpose and project the 4 images into open space forming a single holographic 3d image, allowing a physical copy to be made in minutes.  The parabolic or DCPF method which generates the hologram from a physical object has a limitation to only projecting the surface areas of an object with no control of density between the surface areas, along with the issues of curing depth.  The 4d Cartesian system overcomes these limitations by allowing the areas between the surface areas to varying in density according to the 4 images being superimposed (a simple technique easily overcomes the curing depth issue, and similar techniques are already being used in some form of 3d printers).  Below is an example of 4 images to be superimposed and projected into a single holographic 3d image to be printed.  Since this project has lacked any kind of interest or ideas in bringing this 3d printer with no moveable parts to reality, then I won't be disclosing all of the information related to it, until I build a working prototype.  The lack of interest is more than likely due to most thinking this idea isn't possible.  However, it's actually quite simple, and the resin will more than likely cost more than the 3d printer itself.  However, the resin will be brought down in costs by demand and bulk ordering after this becomes mainstream, and it will become mainstream.  It's just a matter of time and a little effort.

Gravock

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Sponsored links:




Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
I found another method to generate a holographic image using a 4d Cartesian coordinate system which can be developed in an open source program such as Panda3d or Blender.  The 3d printer will superimpose and project the 4 images into open space forming a single holographic 3d image, allowing a physical copy to be made in minutes.  The parabolic or DCPF method which generates the hologram from a physical object has a limitation to only projecting the surface areas of an object with no control of density between the surface areas, along with the issues of curing depth.  The 4d Cartesian system overcomes these limitations by allowing the areas between the surface areas to varying in density according to the 4 images being superimposed (a simple technique easily overcomes the curing depth issue, and similar techniques are already being used in some form of 3d printers).  Below is an example of 4 images to be superimposed and projected into a single holographic 3d image to be printed.  Since this project has lacked any kind of interest or ideas in bringing this 3d printer with no moveable parts to reality, then I won't be disclosing all of the information related to it, until I build a working prototype.  The lack of interest is more than likely due to most thinking this idea isn't possible.  However, it's actually quite simple, and the resin will more than likely cost more than the 3d printer itself.  However, the resin will be brought down in costs by demand and bulk ordering after this becomes mainstream, and it will become mainstream.  It's just a matter of time and a little effort.

Gravock

Ok, this method produces a virtual holographic image instead of a real holographic image projected into 3D space, so this method won't work.  However, both the parabolic and DCPF methods do project a real holographic image into 3d space.  I have an idea on how to overcome the limitations of the curing depth.  Without overcoming this issue, we would be left with a printable part that is analogous to an egg, with a thin hard outside layer and a soft yoke on the inside.

Here's the idea on overcoming the curing depth issues.  Imagine a transparent balloon being filled with a gel.  As the transparent balloon is being filled, the frames of the holographic movie of the part being projected into 3D space is changing at the same rate as the balloon is being inflated with the gel.  In other words, the holographic movie of the part to be copied will be made up of frames or snapshots of the inside of the part to the outside surfaces of the part and will be projected into 3D space hardening the gel as it expands. 

Gravock

Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
Ok, this method produces a virtual holographic image instead of a real holographic image projected into 3D space, so this method won't work.  However, both the parabolic and DCPF methods do project a real holographic image into 3d space.  I have an idea on how to overcome the limitations of the curing depth.  Without overcoming this issue, we would be left with a printable part that is analogous to an egg, with a thin hard outside layer and a soft yoke on the inside.

Here's the idea on overcoming the curing depth issues.  Imagine a transparent balloon being filled with a gel.  As the transparent balloon is being filled, the frames of the holographic movie of the part being projected into 3D space is changing at the same rate as the balloon is being inflated with the gel.  In other words, the holographic movie of the part to be copied will be made up of frames or snapshots of the inside of the part to the outside surfaces of the part and will be projected into 3D space hardening the gel as it expands. 

Gravock

In a way, the concept of this 3D holographic printer mimics the simulation of the universe as matter expands past stationary light.

Gravock

Offline gravityblock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3154
    • Get Dish Now! Free Dish Network System from VMC Satellite
If we sliced a digital image into layers to be displayed onto a LCD, then we can do away with the 3D projection and eliminate the hardware necessary to project a 3D hologram.  The 3D hologram projection is only needed to print all of the layers simultaneously in only a few seconds..  The LCD method will print a sliced layer every few seconds.  The sliced layers is displayed onto the LCD as a slideshow and used as a dynamic mask to cure the resin.  A VAT is placed over the LCD with resin and a glass plate is raised incrementally as the next layer of the sliced image in the slide show is displayed.

Professional LCD 3D Printing Made Accessible
(KickStarter)

The 3D LCD printer looks relatively easy to make at home.  Details can be found with a google search.

Gravock

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Sponsored links:




 

Share this topic to your favourite Social and Bookmark site

Please SHARE this topic at: