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Author Topic: Simple to build isolation transformer that consumes less power than it gives out  (Read 216933 times)

Offline Jack Noskills

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I posted info below at energeticforum in DS thread, but might as well create a new thread here. If anyone can do replications, simulations or make this a self runner then I hope you would tell about it in this thread.
 
I played with two 1:1 trafos a bit and I was able to connect them so that I can get more power out than it consumes. I used small laminated iron trafos whose output was rated at 20 watts. I get maybe about 30-35 watts out, primary uses less than 6 watts. Exact COP is not important as this is low power, but how to get this result should be usefull information. If you have two 1:1 trafos you can easily verify this.
 
Now look at the picture, the second trafo is connected so that as current in one coil goes from left to right, it creates current in the second coil from right to left. Then I feed both currents to load from the same side. When load is connected current on primary side rises for a moment and then it returns back to same level as before. Now the fun starts if this second trafo is more powerfull than the first trafo, it starts pushing power back. I had nanoperm core which I tried, not powerfull enough but the idle current in primary went down a bit when power was taken. Thus COP was increased even more.

I also tried series caps between load and trafos, and they further increased output while input went down. I ended up in a situation where 25 watt bulb on the primary side did not even glow while output was about 30-35 watts. After enough series caps primary side started to consume more so I quess I was sort of tuning it.
 
The first trafo has high self inductance (coil resistance 165 ohms), meaning that when it is connected to mains without load only little current goes through. This high self inductance is essential to get OU effect. I smashed some chinese made christmas light trafos and took four primaries from there and made 1:1 trafos from them. My 1:1 version was not perfect so it had a bit more this leakage current than the real one. This I was able to reduce with series caps but I think that caps would not have been needed if I could have made just little tighter package. At one instance I squeezed the first isolation trafo so that its self inductance increased, power at this trafo went down while output power increased.
 
If someone has scope, then it would be usefull to check out what exactly happens if you replicate this. Maybe even a simulator could show this effect as there are no spark gaps involved.
 
Has anyone seen this before ? If not, then I have a name for it: TrollBuster, lol.
Not sure if this is good enough for OU prize but might as well try.
 
I like this circuit because you can go and buy best of the best 1:1 isolation transformers you can find and connect them as shown. You will then get all the power one transformer can give but you don't use grid power, you create your own power when you use it. This is what Tesla said, energy creation by energy consumption.
 
I could wish you good luck when replicating, but I don't because luck is not needed. You can make only one mistake, you connect the second trafo in wrong way. If so, then you got no power at output but primary uses all. Just reverse the wires to fix it.
 
So here you have it.

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Offline broli

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Without an oscilloscope I wouldn't even dare to make such a post to be honest. Using a DSO you can extract the voltage/current measurement and do a mean calculation on the product of the two, which gives you the real average power.
Guesstimating with light bulbs is prone to very biased results.

I don't have any isolation transformers laying around to be honest to check this out but I'm sure plenty of people do have.


Offline Jack Noskills

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Dont have any fancy stuff around, thats one reason I posted so others could check it out. I try to explain my crude measurement.
 
First just one trafo, I put hot line on primary side through a 40 watt light bulb so I can see what is consumed.
No load connected, light on primary side is dimm, hardly visible. If I could have squeezed in more iron it would be off.
Then I put 40 watt on secondary side as load. Light on primary side goes to full brightness, and secondary side has little less light. This is normal trafo operation.
Is this correct/false way to measure ?
 
Then I connect second trafo as shown in the picture.
No load, light on primary side about the same level so it works in the same way as normal trafo which is good.
40 watt bulb as load, light on primary side blinks and then it returns to level it was. Light on secondary side is lit, not as bright but maybe 30-35 watts.
 
Caps are not needed, I just tested them for any effect. I wanted to mention about them as they helped. Use of nanoperm core with different coil as the second trafo resulted in this idle current to go down even more. The second trafo must be strong enough so it can create the power.
 
I cannot do power measurements, I busted my meter while ago, hence explanation with light bulbs. Hope you could follow my explanation. You can use whatever trafo you can find, only requirement is high self inductance.
 
My view is that first trafo gives one push, and then it gets two pushes back one of which is in the same phase/opposite compared to first one. Scope shots could explain, but don't have scope.

Offline FatBird

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Sounds Interesting.
 
Please post a picture of your setup.
 
Thank you.
 
.


Offline JouleSeeker

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Hi, Jack --
This is "PhysicsProf" from EF.    I'd like to give this a try.  It may take a little while as I need to get the 1:1 trafos.

 I have a couple of oscilloscopes, watt-meters, etc. which might prove helpful in this study.
 Thanks for posting, Jack.

(PS -- I'm pulling for you to get the prize(s)!)

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Offline e2matrix

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Wow,  Sounds very interesting.  I've had a fascination for some time with the idea that simply some coils and transformers might be able to do something OU.  I am thinking this also fits in with some info I got from William Lyne in his book Occult Ether Physics or his other book.  I've got scopes (one digital) and a watt meter but not sure about 1:1 trafo's. 
   Looking forward to where this goes and will try to dig up or make some 1:1's.  I know Jack Noskills has a lot more talent than his name would suggest  ;)

Offline e2matrix

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BTW what is you name over at Energeticforum or what is the name of the message thread there?  Oops I see now you said the DS thread (Don Smith thread).

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Offline mscoffman

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Hi,
 
Not taking sides here. But you can synthesize a 1:1 transformer if you have several
(4) identical step down transformers and place them back to back conecting the LV
secondaries. For example if you have two identical utility-voltage to 12VAC step down
transformers you can make them into one 1:1 utility-voltage transformer by connecting
the 12VAC windings to each other. I do this when I need a ground isolated utility voltage
in the US and don't have a spare 1:1. Can't see why this wouldn't work in this situation.
Note the "WVA power" rating of the transformers because high LV currents can cause
winding heating.
 
:S:MarkSCoffman

Offline Magluvin

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Hey Jack

Are you sure of the circuit connections in the drawing?  I ran it on Falstad sim. The way you have it, Im getting little output as the load is across the transformer winding and the winding doesnt seem to want to give up anything to the resistor/load.

I tried switching the connections of one of the windings on the second transformer. and now there is output, but is is somewhat under the input.

Maybe Im missing something.  Im interested though.  ;]

Mags

Offline baroutologos

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I posted info below at energeticforum in DS thread, but might as well create a new thread here. If anyone can do replications, simulations or make this a self runner then I hope you would tell about it in this thread.
 
I played with two 1:1 trafos a bit and I was able to connect them so that I can get more power out than it consumes. I used small laminated iron trafos whose output was rated at 20 watts. I get maybe about 30-35 watts out, primary uses less than 6 watts. Exact COP is not important as this is low power, but how to get this result should be usefull information. If you have two 1:1 trafos you can easily verify this.
 ...

So here you have it.


Lets be serious. What is supposed those 2 transformers to be? A normal one connected to mains (standard little input while idling and when working some 80-90% eff.) and a second one @ 1:1 ratio wired ala bucking (Series canceling is that right?) configuration. and in parallel to second wiring the load... nothing near OU can be expected from that.


 And please, dont mention Tesla's name just to give credibility to your claims.
If

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Offline Lynxsteam

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I'll give it a try.  I have two identical Torroids with isolated 1:1 windings.  I have a single phase alternator that puts out a nice sine wave.  I will use a 1 watt bulb as a load, and see what happens.  I am optimistically skeptical. :)

Update:  I spent a little time with it and it definitely performs like a joule thief.  Not with AC, but if you pulse the DC, it puts out enough power to do more than the DC alone.  The flyback will light an LED whereas the 1 volt DC alone can't.  With AC, there's no sudden collapse of the field.   I can see where the spikes could add.  I'll fool with it some more.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2012, 04:59:31 AM by Lynxsteam »

Offline Jack Noskills

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I did some more testing and I think I see what is happening. I try to explain.
 
I removed first trafo and connected directly to mains via 1 uf cap so it acts as current limiter.
For comparison test I put two lamps is series after cap and both lit at the same brightness, hardly visible. Earlier I have measured that I get about 80 mA via 1 uf cap.
 
Then I added second trafo as shown in figure, in this case bulb B is brighly lit while bulb A has no light. When I disconnect bulb B, I get flash of light in bulb A. So beware if you want to use signal generator directly as it shoots back. With two trafos I got flash at bulb A when load is connected so it is safer.
 
Next I added more caps, 7 uf so they should give 560 mA. Bulb B lights a bit more, bulb A still no light. Then I put more load at B and now I see bulb A getting lit.
 
My interpretation is that when load exceeds what core can produce only then it starts to suck more from the caps.
 
It is important to get the first trafo to operate in a sweet spot. The coil I used had very thin wire, must be over 10000 turns. If someone tests with some other trafo you can test it easily if it is suitable. Connect it to source without load, there should be very little idle current.
 
If you have ferrite and idle current is too high, then put parallel cap at source so you get tank circuit. Then exactly the same kind of trafo on output side and put same valued cap in series, like in the figure shown. Now find the sweet spot where current drops closest to zero on first trafo. When you see it, connect some load, what is the result ?
 
This should be a resonant trafo, I haven't tested this so it is merely a suggestion. I would try it if I had equipment.
I have only tested with pure sine wave, as that is what comes from the mains. No idea what happens with other waveforms.


Offline newton2

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HI , my kind greetings to honoured profiles of this ouforum....and thanks for this interesting suggestion for further discussing basics for OU made by mutual inductances....and by reactive networks..the hitherto in this newly thread of topic and answering comments though still is in the socalled state of prestudy and prestudying discussions circumstances...might it kindly be hinted, that if arranging surden researching concepts and if keeping experimental layout to a few electrotechnical reactive components,
then it is by established physics and technics possible to obtain OU...if named energy-generation though , then the circumstance of whether the term energy is auto-consistent in nature...or possible more aike a supporting-tern of conveniences in established elder physics...by solely own researches once upon years back was proven and demonstrated an OU-device capable by such electrotechnics reactive components layout...it is possible to calculate this interesting thread´s electro-technical foundation...yes,tricky if when more than one inductances-mutuality appear in a common circuit..the transfer by mutuality-coupling and alterations of impedances if when applying a "load" or removing a "load"....might it kindly be refered to elder book-paper-versions of elder, especially the elder versions , of electro-technics theses and formulas of mutuality-reactive-connectios......THANKS INDEED FOR SUCH IMPORTANT BASICAL DISCUSSING...really thanks to thread´s author plus answering authors.....have all Yourselves a nice day and fruitfull results from Yout various hardlabored deeds and workings concerning the honourable goal of OU....p.s.as a mere brief hint : profile zweiternewton in the other ou-forum/my profile zweiternewton/ouforum.de/OU bei Reaktanznetzwerk...   

Offline T-1000

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This should be a resonant trafo, I haven't tested this so it is merely a suggestion. I would try it if I had equipment.
I have only tested with pure sine wave, as that is what comes from the mains. No idea what happens with other waveforms.

If to push this even further, can you adjust resonant drequency of second trafo to frequency of AC source? Also if you have step up+step down trafos, you need spark gap between them so the losses of step down transformer would be compensated with power coming from step up transformer on oscilation peaks.
The missing link here is exactly this: you need resonant LC oscilations on output transformer for maximum output. This can be found in various circuits including N. Tesla and Don Smith.

If you will play with it, here is my modded circuit to start with:


Offline Jack Noskills

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Hey Jack

Are you sure of the circuit connections in the drawing?  I ran it on Falstad sim. The way you have it, Im getting little output as the load is across the transformer winding and the winding doesnt seem to want to give up anything to the resistor/load.

I tried switching the connections of one of the windings on the second transformer. and now there is output, but is is somewhat under the input.

Maybe Im missing something.  Im interested though.  ;]

Mags

Seems that simulation and real world do not match.
Resistance of 40 watt bulb is 1215 ohms (220 V grid). When current comes to upper junction from left, it wants to go through higher resistance bulb rather than against current that comes from the second coil, which the first coil created. Resistance of second coil was 165 ohms for iron trafo and about 45 ohms with nanoperm.

When current comes below bulb, it wants to go through lower coil as it has lower resistance than bulb. As this creates current in the upper coil current again is forced through bulb in the same way.
 
I you imagine this as water pipes, water does not go upstream if there is even a tiny hole elsewhere.
Is this is what really happens, I don't actually care since it works.
 
The very first picture missed the dot. In the later picture dot is in correct place.

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