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Author Topic: Inertial Propulsion Secret  (Read 7564 times)

Offline Jerry Volland

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  • Posts: 109
Inertial Propulsion Secret
« on: November 17, 2011, 06:51:07 PM »
With certain devices, the output shaft actually slows down under the load of mechanical thrust production.  When this happens, it can be seen that the thrust impulse has a different waveform than the motor's torque.  So, in some cases, the thrust impulse will be dampened out if coupling with the motor is maintained.  Even though the thrust mechanism often times must be momentarially disconnected from the motor and any associated flywheel mass, to preserve the thrust impulse's waveform and direction, this is a factor which isn't always recognized.
 
I've attached a picture of a device which illustrates this phenomenon.
 
This system has two motors, one to spin the weighted hinges and another to add an extrinsic acceleration to the opposing weights.  With the top hinge turning towards the center of the larger motor, the applied centrifuge force causes the top hinge to open and the bottom hinge to close.  In theory, this will produce a force differential, due to the weights' differing spin radii, a common theme in Inertial Propulsion.
 
When I turned the machine on, there was in fact a rapid succession of short non-precessional thrust impulses.  However, after a brief time the chuck holding the hinges unexpectedly fell off.  (Serendipity: an unexpected accidental discovery.)  Inspection showed the retaining screw was missing.  Analysis revealed that the hinge rotation was slowing under load, causing the chuck to incrementally screw off, even though there was enough friction with the shaft to allow the motor to get a grip and kick the hinges back up to speed between impulses.
 
To confirm this analysis, I secured the chuck so it couldn't screw off, then ran the machine again.  This time, there was a quick succession of torque impulses which rotated the base frame around the central motor's shaft.  With a slip clutch, there was thrust.  With rigid coupling, there was only torque.
 
Not all Inertial Propulsion systems will manifest this thrust dampening effect.  But if you build something which doesn't do what you think it will, consider including some type of clutch.  The second picture shows a solenoid activated spring clutch I found in a VCR.  The gear, shaft, and solenoid are all free wheeling, until the solenoid is activated.  Then the shaft free wheels in the solenoid, but the gear is locked to the shaft.
 
Using one of these with my new intrinsic unit, I can hear the little battery motor going "er, er, er", repeatedly torquing under load.  Respinning the hinges loads the motor, but the slower, uncoupled thrust impulse does not.  And that's how it should be, since you might want thrust part of the time and something else part of the time, switching between the two.  But my new test sub assembly wouldn't work at all, with the full system, if it didn't have a clutch.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Inertial Propulsion Secret
« on: November 17, 2011, 06:51:07 PM »

Offline energia9

  • Sr. Member
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  • Posts: 380
Re: Inertial Propulsion Secret
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2011, 07:30:31 PM »
With certain devices, the output shaft actually slows down under the load of mechanical thrust production.  When this happens, it can be seen that the thrust impulse has a different waveform than the motor's torque.  So, in some cases, the thrust impulse will be dampened out if coupling with the motor is maintained.  Even though the thrust mechanism often times must be momentarially disconnected from the motor and any associated flywheel mass, to preserve the thrust impulse's waveform and direction, this is a factor which isn't always recognized.
 
I've attached a picture of a device which illustrates this phenomenon.
 
This system has two motors, one to spin the weighted hinges and another to add an extrinsic acceleration to the opposing weights.  With the top hinge turning towards the center of the larger motor, the applied centrifuge force causes the top hinge to open and the bottom hinge to close.  In theory, this will produce a force differential, due to the weights' differing spin radii, a common theme in Inertial Propulsion.
 
When I turned the machine on, there was in fact a rapid succession of short non-precessional thrust impulses.  However, after a brief time the chuck holding the hinges unexpectedly fell off.  (Serendipity: an unexpected accidental discovery.)  Inspection showed the retaining screw was missing.  Analysis revealed that the hinge rotation was slowing under load, causing the chuck to incrementally screw off, even though there was enough friction with the shaft to allow the motor to get a grip and kick the hinges back up to speed between impulses.
 
To confirm this analysis, I secured the chuck so it couldn't screw off, then ran the machine again.  This time, there was a quick succession of torque impulses which rotated the base frame around the central motor's shaft.  With a slip clutch, there was thrust.  With rigid coupling, there was only torque.
 
Not all Inertial Propulsion systems will manifest this thrust dampening effect.  But if you build something which doesn't do what you think it will, consider including some type of clutch.  The second picture shows a solenoid activated spring clutch I found in a VCR.  The gear, shaft, and solenoid are all free wheeling, until the solenoid is activated.  Then the shaft free wheels in the solenoid, but the gear is locked to the shaft.
 
Using one of these with my new intrinsic unit, I can hear the little battery motor going "er, er, er", repeatedly torquing under load.  Respinning the hinges loads the motor, but the slower, uncoupled thrust impulse does not.  And that's how it should be, since you might want thrust part of the time and something else part of the time, switching between the two.  But my new test sub assembly wouldn't work at all, with the full system, if it didn't have a clutch.
very good direction..  im interrested in your development!
peace

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline Jerry Volland

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  • Posts: 109
Re: Inertial Propulsion Secret
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2011, 07:18:59 PM »
very good direction..  im interrested in your development!
peace
Thank you.
peace

 

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