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Author Topic: Simple mechanical rectifier  (Read 10969 times)

Offline webby1

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Simple mechanical rectifier
« on: April 20, 2011, 10:20:38 PM »
Here is a pic of a simple mechanical rectifier I built for a few purposes, it is the heart of a CVT that I was building for bicycles incorporating a linear pedal system.  I am sure something like this is readily available, to many uses for it not to be, but I had the parts to make it, so I did.

I also adapted the unit to run with two solenoids but it can be run with any reciprocating input.

It is built with one way needle rollers inside the plastic gears, as you can see the two input gears (on the left) have their shafts connected together with an arm so that they rotate in the same direction as each other and the one way needle rollers let one shaft freewheel inside the gear while the other is providing the force to drive the output gear(on the right), one direction of input turns the gear next to the output gear one way and the opposite direction from the input turns the outer gear which turns the inner gear while the shaft inside the inner gear is freewheeling.

CVT value is achieved by the input shaft drive arm, it is located in the upper left part of the pic sort of by the screw, when you move your input source up or down the arm, with a fixed input length of reciprocation,  it changes the gear ratio and if the arm is long enough to reach the minimum value for the one way needle rollers the output will go to zero.  I have chosen to limit my arm motion to about 60 degrees to try and keep it in the sweet spot of applied force.

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Simple mechanical rectifier
« on: April 20, 2011, 10:20:38 PM »

Offline z.monkey

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Re: Simple mechanical rectifier
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2011, 12:30:48 AM »
That's totally old school...

I had to look it up...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanical_rectifier

My electromechanical inverter is about that same time period...
Well, except for the electronics...
http://www.overunity.com/index.php?topic=6754.0

There is a lot to be learned from early electrical research and devices...

Nice work...

Offline webby1

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Re: Simple mechanical rectifier
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2011, 12:53:06 AM »
In the old days you were told what works better, today they just say what way will work and that the other ways don't.
Most of the time the other ways work they just have some issues that, well, strange people like us just might like :)

I used to have an instructional from 1954 UK, one of my sons borrowed it and that was the last I saw of it, but in the book there was this add for a cap that had a scope pattern of the resonant circuit running backwards in time at the top of the spike,, that was one of the books that got me hooked into looking at things from as many angles as possible.

If you use a counter rotating mass unit to make a mechanical oscillator and then hook it to the mechanical rectifier you have a working mechanical model of a transformer.

Thanks

Offline webby1

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Re: Simple mechanical rectifier
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2011, 08:28:31 PM »
per request here a 2 pics of the device.

The first one is just a side view, the second one is the unit disassembled showing the one way needle roller in the middle of the gear.

Offline suvra.saha79

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Re: Simple mechanical rectifier
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2011, 10:11:39 PM »
Well, it's really a very good initiative. Just carry on. Hope it's performance will also be very awesome...

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« Last Edit: May 26, 2011, 03:37:57 AM by suvra.saha79 »

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Simple mechanical rectifier
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2011, 10:11:39 PM »
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